Agenda

Consolidated



Parks and Environment Committee


Meeting No. 15   Contact Carol Kaustinen, Committee Administrator
Meeting Date Thursday, November 17, 2016
  Phone 416-338-5089
Start Time 9:30 AM
  E-mail pec@toronto.ca
Location Committee Room 1, City Hall
  Chair   Councillor Michelle Holland  


Parks and Environment Committee

Councillor Michelle Holland, Chair

Councillor Mike Layton, Vice Chair

Councillor Maria Augimeri

Councillor Joe Cressy

Councillor Sarah Doucette

Councillor Gord Perks

 

Members of Council and Staff:  Please keep this agenda and the accompanying material until the City Council meeting dealing with these matters has ended.

 

Special Assistance for Members of the Public:  City staff can arrange for special assistance with some advance notice. If you need special assistance, please call 416-338-5089, TTY 416-338-0889 or e‑mail pec@toronto.ca.

 

Closed Meeting Requirements:  If the Parks and Environment Committee wants to meet in closed session (privately), a member of the Committee must make a motion to do so and give the reason why the Committee has to meet privately (City of Toronto Act, 2006).

 

Notice to people writing or making presentations to the Parks and Environment Committee:  The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it - such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address - available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

 

Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view. If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast. Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

 

If you want to learn more about why and how the City collects your information, write to the City Clerk's Office, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto ON M5H 2N2 or by calling 416-338-5089.


toronto.ca/council

This agenda and any supplementary materials submitted to the City Clerk can be found online at www.toronto.ca/council. Visit the website for access to all agendas, reports, decisions and minutes of City Council and its committees.

 

 

 

 

 

Declarations of Interest under the Municipal Conflict of Interest Act

 

Confirmation of Minutes - October 19, 2016

 

Speakers/Presentations: A complete list will be distributed at the meeting

 

Communications/Reports

PE15.1

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

TransformTO: Climate Action for a Healthy Equitable, and Prosperous Toronto
Origin
(November 2, 2016) Report from the Chief Corporate Officer
Recommendations

The Chief Corporate Officer recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the TransformTO Short-term Strategies, as presented in Attachment A to this report (November 2, 2016) from the Chief Corporate Officer.

 

2.  City Council direct City Divisions, Agencies and Corporations with support from the Chief Corporate Officer, to develop business cases as part of the 2018 budget process to support the implementation of the strategies outlined in the TransformTO Short-term Strategies.

 

3.  City Council direct the City Manager to advocate to the Provincial and Federal governments for program funding, co-delivery opportunities and related policy and regulatory supports necessary to implement the TransformTO Short-term Strategies and prepare the City for success in achieving the 2050 target.

 

4.  City Council authorize the City Manager or his/her designate to negotiate and enter into all necessary agreements, including funding agreements, to support the implementation of the TransformTO Short-term Strategies in forms satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

Summary

Initiated in 2015, TransformTO is a community-wide, cross-corporate initiative designed to engage residents, experts, stakeholders and all City Divisions, Agencies and Corporations on how Toronto can achieve a low-carbon future that meets the needs of all Torontonians. In March 2015 the Parks and Environment Subcommittee on Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation was created to guide and support the project. TransformTO is co-managed by the Environment and Energy Division and the Toronto Atmospheric Fund.

 

Between March 2015 and July 2016 over 2000 Torontonians participated in TransformTO conversations about our low-carbon future. TransformTO is undertaking comprehensive technical analysis of strategies and actions to get Toronto to our long-term low-carbon target of reducing emissions by 80 percent from 1990 levels by 2050.

  

Toronto will not meet Council's 2050 goal without significant action and investment. There is a 8.7 million tonne gap between our projected GHG emissions in 2050 and our low-carbon target. Over the next 34 years transformative changes to the City’s core urban systems - transportation, building design and operation, energy systems and waste management - will be necessary.

 

In 2007 City Council adopted the progressive Climate Change and Clean Air Action Plan, positioning Toronto as a leader and innovator in climate action. The programs and policies developed and championed here are emulated across North America and internationally.  Many of the programs and policies from the 2007 Climate Change and Clean Air Action Plan and the 2009 Sustainable Energy Strategy continue to reduce GHG emissions, however we will need to aggressively expand and enhance these while adding others over the intervening 33 years to meet the 2050 goal established by Council. To date, GHG emissions in Toronto have dropped by over 24 percent since 1990. TransformTO is the next step along Toronto's climate action path.

 

This report presents a package of short-term strategies to expand and accelerate our existing innovative programs and policies to maximize their emission reduction potential to 2020. In the short-term we need to exceed our 2020 target to put us closer to the necessary trajectory to Council's 2050 low-carbon target. This report also identifies the building blocks of our long-term low-carbon strategy as Council needs to align its decisions today with Toronto's long-term low-carbon goals.

  

Successful implementation of the proposed package of Short-term Strategies in Attachment A will lead to between 455,000 and 857,000 tonnes of additional GHG reductions by 2020, beyond the emission reductions already anticipated from Toronto's existing programs and policies (see Figure 1).

 

For further information see Figure 1 in staff report: Toronto's measured and projected GHG emissions to 2050 and impact of proposed TransformTO Short-term Strategies. 

Financial Impact

There is no direct financial impact associated with this report.

 

Approval of future budget requests is critical to expanding the staffing and resource capacity of the Environment and Energy Division to jump-start the TransformTO Short-term Strategies. Future year funding commitments by the City, combined with leveraging private capital and senior government funding, will ultimately influence the City's success in achieving the City's emissions reduction potential by 2020.

 

In subsequent fiscal years, business cases will be initiated to request the necessary operating and capital funds to support the implementation of the cross-corporate actions identified in the TransformTO Short-term Strategies, in concert with the City’s budget process.

 

Provincial and federal programs are also creating new direct funding and co-delivery opportunities for municipalities and/or their residents to support emission reduction activity. Ontario’s cap and trade system is expected to generate $1.8 billion a year in proceeds to be directed towards carbon emission reduction activities and programs. The anticipated price on carbon also creates more favourable business cases for investments in low-carbon capital projects (e.g. building energy efficiency retrofits). Toronto should proactively position itself to take best advantage of these new funding resources. The short-term strategies presented in Attachment A indicate when they are aligned with provincial priorities.  Private investment will also have a role to play in some capital projects and will be sought as appropriate.

 

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(November 2, 2016) Report from the Chief Corporate Officer on TransformTO: Climate Action for a Healthy, Equitable and Prosperous Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-98039.pdf)

Attachment A: TransformTO Short-term Strategies
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-98040.pdf)

Attachment B: TransformTO Phase 1 Community Engagement Report - Part 1
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-98041.pdf)

Attachment B: TransformTO Phase 1 Community Engagement Report - Part 2
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-98042.pdf)

Attachment C: TransformTO Technical Backgrounder
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-98043.pdf)

(November 17, 2016) Presentation from the Senior Environmental Planner, Implementation and Support, Environment and Energy on Transform TO: Climate Action for Healthy, Equitable and Prosperous Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-98509.pdf)

Communications
(November 11, 2016) E-mail from Patricia Warwick (PE.New.PE15.1.1)
(November 14, 2016) E-mail from Halyna Zalucky (PE.New.PE15.1.2)
(November 16, 2016) E-mail from Heather Marshall, Campaigns Director, Toronto Environmental Alliance TEA  (PE.New.PE15.1.3)
(November 17, 2016) E-mail from Ann Russell, Co-Chair Green Neighbours 20 and Emily Greenleaf, Co-Chair, Green Neighbours 20 and Gary Pieters, President CityPlace Residents’ Association and Rory “Gus” Sinclair, Chair, Harbord Village Residents’ Association  (PE.New.PE15.1.4)
(November 17, 2016) E-mail from Sharon Howarth (PE.New.PE15.1.5)
(November 17, 2016) E-mail from Dusha Sritharan, Campaigner Toronto Environmental Alliance (PE.New.PE15.1.6)
(November 17, 2016) E-mail from Lyn Adamson, Barry Mitchell, Climatefast (PE.New.PE15.1.7)
(November 17, 2016) E-mail from Karen Buck (PE.New.PE15.1.8)
(November 16, 2016) E-mail from Hamish Wilson (PE.New.PE15.1.9)

1a TransformTO: Climate Action for a Healthy, Equitable and Prosperous Toronto
Origin
(November 14, 2016) Letter from the Parks and Environment Subcommittee on Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation
Recommendations

The Parks and Environment Subcommittee on Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the TransformTO Short-term Strategies, as presented in Attachment A to the report (November 2, 2016) from the Chief Corporate Officer.

 

2.  City Council direct City Divisions, Agencies and Corporations with support from the Chief Corporate Officer, to develop business cases as part of the 2018 budget process to support the implementation of the strategies outlined in the TransformTO Short-term Strategies.

 

3.  City Council direct the City Manager to advocate to the Provincial and Federal governments for program funding, co-delivery opportunities and related policy and regulatory supports necessary to implement the TransformTO Short-term Strategies and prepare the City for success in achieving the 2050 target.

 

4.  City Council authorize the City Manager or his/her designate to negotiate and enter into all necessary agreements, including funding agreements, to support the implementation of the TransformTO Short-term Strategies in forms satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

Summary

The Parks and Environment Subcommittee on Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation on November 14, 2016 considered a report (November 2, 2016) from the Chief Corporate Officer on TransformTO: Climate Action for a Healthy, Equitable and Prosperous Toronto.

 

The Parks and Environment Subcommittee on Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation also:

 

1. Directed the Chief Corporate Officer to submit the expected second report on TransformTO to the Parks and Environment Committee no later than May 2017 and include as part of the second report, as possible additions to the short-term strategies, an evaluation of:

 

a. A ban or restrictions on gas powered lawn and garden equipment;

 

b. By-law changes to encourage urban agriculture in new development;

 

c. Move to zero carbon district energy option;

 

d. Policies to reduce construction waste;

 

e. Feasibility of installing renewable energy on parking facilities; and

 

f. Requiring climate change warning labels at gas stations in Toronto, under the City of Toronto Act.

Background Information
(November 14, 2016) Letter from the Parks and Environment Subcommittee on Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation on TransformTO: Climate Action for a Healthy, Equitable and Prosperous Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-98426.pdf)


PE15.2

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Resilient City - Preparing for a Changing Climate - Status Update and Next Steps
Origin
(November 2, 2016) Report from the Chief Corporate Officer
Recommendations

The Chief Corporate Officer recommends that:

 

1.  City Council receive this report for information.

Summary

Toronto has and is forecast to experience altered patterns of extreme weather as a result of climate change. Enhancing the resilience of Toronto’s infrastructure and services to these changing weather patterns to reduce the risk of damage and associated costs, injury and emergency situations is a priority of City Council.

 

In 2014, City Council adopted the Climate Change Risk Management Policy outlining responsibilities and a governance structure for implementing the policy. Council also directed that staff report back on the status of implementation of the policy in 2016.

 

Implementation of the policy has been guided by use of a Thematic Area High Level Risk Assessment (HLRA) approach, designed by the cross-corporate Resilient City Work Group to:

 

-  identify and assess potential risks of climate change and associated extreme weather events;

 

-  define the interdependencies between key infrastructure and service providers, both private and public sector; and

 

-  outline the actions that could be taken to mitigate priority risks.

 

Over the past year, High Level Risk Assessments (HLRA) have been undertaken in three Thematic Areas: Utilities, Transportation and Water, in close collaboration with City divisions, as well as external private and broader public sector organizations. To date, work has involved City Planning, Environment and Energy, Engineering and Construction Services, Toronto Water, Toronto Public Health, Transportation Services, Toronto Transit Commission (TTC), Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA), Toronto Hydro, Metrolinx, Hydro One, Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO), Enwave, Enbridge, and representatives of the telecom sector. This report presents the key findings of the HLRA process, including a discussion of risks and interdependencies.

 

The HLRA process has brought together City operations with private and broader public sector service providers to identify, assess and develop solutions to improve Toronto’s resilience to climate change. The HLRA needs to continue to ensure the process is completed for the other seven thematic areas. For this work to continue, the Environment and Energy Division will require additional resources to restore staffing to 2016 levels to deliver on full implementation of the Resilient City Initiative.

 

This report also provides an update on:

 

-  adoption of a Climate Change Risk Management Policy by key City Agencies and Corporations, as directed by Council in 2014;

 

-  an update on the adaptation actions outlined in the 2014 Resilient City - Preparing for a Changing Climate Staff Report, plus new actions;

 

-  the development of the Extreme Weather Portal; and

 

-  the preparation of guidelines for back-up power in multi-residential buildings.

 

It is important to note that this report focuses on improving Toronto's resilience to extreme weather for the purposes of reducing or mitigating the risk of damage, injury and emergency situations. Extreme weather, while changing in frequency and severity due to climate change, is only one of many risks that the City must consider in building up its resilience to extreme shocks. The outcomes of the HLRA will be provided to the City’s Toronto Emergency Management and Preparedness Committee (TEMPC) for discussion within the context of other risk management scenarios and evaluations.

Financial Impact

Approval of future budget requests is critical to expanding the staffing and resource capacity of the Environment and Energy Division to maintain and continue the Resilient City work programs. As part of the Resilient City initiative, funding requirements for additional resources to restore staffing levels from 2016 will be included in future Operating Budget submissions of the Facilities Management, Real Estate, Environment and Energy (FREEE) Division for Council consideration to deliver on activities associated with the implementation of the Resilient City initiative, as outlined in this report.

 

In subsequent fiscal years, business cases will be initiated to request the necessary operating and capital funds to support the implementation of the cross-corporate actions identified in this staff report, in concert with the City’s budget process.

 

Provincial and federal programs may also create new direct funding and co-delivery opportunities for municipalities and/or their residents to support adaptation and resilience. Toronto should proactively position itself to take best advantage of these new funding resources. Private and philanthropic funding will also have a role to play.

 

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(November 2, 2016) Report and Appendices A to E from the Chief Corporate Officer on Resilient City - Preparing for a Changing Climate - Status Update and Next Steps
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-98049.pdf)

Presentation from the Manager, Environment, Environmental Implementation and Support, Environment and Energy and the Project Lead - Environment, Environmental Implementation and Support, Environment and Energy on Resilient City - Preparing for a Changing Climate - Status Update and Next Steps
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-98541.pdf)

Communications
(November 17, 2016) E-mail from James Kennedy, Magnolia Generation (PE.New.PE15.2.1)
(November 16, 2016) E-mail from Hamish Wilson (PE.New.PE15.2.2)

PE15.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Energy Storage Strategy Development
Origin
(October 27, 2016) Report from the Chief Corporate Officer
Recommendations

The Chief Corporate Officer recommends that:

 

1.   The Parks and Environment Committee request the Director, Environment and Energy, in consultation with the General Manager, Economic Development, Toronto Hydro and post-secondary institutions, to report to the Parks and Environment Committee by the third quarter, 2017 on an Energy Storage Strategy for the City that:

 

a.  Aligns with new and existing City initiatives including resilience, greenhouse gas reduction, energy conservation and demand management;

 

b.  Investigates the feasibility for partnerships and pilot projects at City Facilities; and

 

c.  Incorporates Toronto Hydro's energy storage initiatives.

Summary

This report is provided as an update to the request from City Council to the Director, Environment and Energy to consult with Toronto Hydro-Electric System Limited (Toronto Hydro), and report to the Parks and Environment Committee on:

 

a.  The use of stored energy as a means of further reducing peak usage and reducing energy costs; and

 

b.  The potential for partnerships with Toronto post-secondary institutions and private sector companies to pilot new technologies for energy storage at City facilities.

 

Energy storage technologies are innovative and versatile with the potential to optimize energy use, provide electrical grid stability and support climate change and resiliency. Currently the City of Toronto is host to several Toronto Hydro pilots including small scale lithium ion battery applications as well as an underwater compressed air energy storage system.

 

Utility scale lithium ion batteries are currently in the commercialization phase of development and are not yet financially viable.  Capital costs are expected to decrease as the technology improves and obtains economies of scale. Similarly, other types of energy storage technologies including compressed air systems are at an equivalent stage of development. The city continues to evaluate the development and will incorporate them into the energy storage strategy when their effectiveness has been validated.

 

In consultation with Toronto Hydro and a local post-secondary institution the City proposes to develop an Energy Storage Strategy to evaluate technology options and where they might align with new and existing city programs and initiatives.

Financial Impact

There is no financial impact resulting from the approval of this report.

 

Project approval is contingent upon the development of a business case demonstrating positive results and approval by the Chief Corporate Officer or the Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer.

 

Any future financial impacts identified in the Energy Storage Strategy will form part of a subsequent report to Council and will be included in future budget submissions for Council consideration.

 

Funding associated with the Energy Storage Strategy initiative will utilize recoverable debt whereby cost avoidance from reducing electricity demand during peak periods and potential revenue streams will be used by participating divisions to repay the recoverable debt.

 

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(October 27, 2016) Report from the Chief Corporate Officer on Energy Storage Strategy Development
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-97977.pdf)


PE15.4

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Request for Authorization to Negotiate and Enter into a New Smart Commute Agreement with Metrolinx
Origin
(October 27, 2016) Report from the Chief Corporate Officer
Recommendations

The Chief Corporate Officer recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the Director, Environment and Energy to negotiate a service delivery agreement with Metrolinx in order to update the organizational funding and administrative structure for the Smart Commute Workplace Program on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Director, Environment and Energy and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

 

2.  City Council authorize the Director, Environment and Energy to execute the service delivery agreement with Metrolinx and the funding agreements with the three Transportation Management Associations (Smart Commute Pearson Airport Area; Smart Commute Northeast Toronto; and Smart Commute North Toronto – Vaughan), together with any agreements and ancillary documents required for the delivery of the Smart Commute Workplace Program, in these geographic areas.

 

3.  City Council authorize the Director, Environment and Energy to negotiate and execute future service agreements with Metrolinx and funding agreements with Transportation Management Associations, together with any agreements and ancillary documents required for the delivery of the Smart Commute Workplace Program, on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Director, Environment and Energy and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

Summary

This purpose of this report is to seek Council approval for the Director, Environment and Energy to negotiate a new agreement with Metrolinx for the Smart Commute Workplace Program in order to update the organizational funding and administrative structure and obtain authorization to extend current funding agreements for existing service delivery organizations.

 

Coincident with our existing funding agreement with Metrolinx that expires at the end of 2016, Metrolinx has undertaken a program review of the Smart Commute Workplace Program.  Based on the program review Metrolinx has decided to change the program governance from 13 Transportation Management Associations (TMAs) contracted by Metrolinx to a model where Metrolinx will directly fund six municipal partners across the GTHA to take over management of the TMAs and their service delivery organizations starting in 2017. The City of Toronto will be given authority to administer the Smart Commute Workplace Program through its choice of delivery models in order to increase flexibility and create greater alignment with City objectives. Metrolinx believes these changes will improve value for money and better demonstrate results through project-based reporting.

 

The City of Toronto recognizes changes to the built environment and efforts to reduce congestion and greenhouse gas emissions must include transportation demand management initiatives to build individual and organization’s awareness and understanding of their travel options, shape their preferences and encourage them to try new ways of travelling.

Financial Impact

Metrolinx will increase the amount of annual funding to the City of Toronto from $323,200 to $520,580 plus a one-time transition payment of $7,500 to the City for the Smart Commute Workplace Program.

 Upon receiving the funding, an appropriate in-year budget adjustment will be made to the 2017 Operating Budget for Facilities Management, Real Estate, Environment & Energy (FREEE) to account for the incremental increase of $204,880 gross and $0 net, including the one-time transition payment, funded by Metrolinx. There will be no net increase to the City of Toronto's 2017 Operating Budget.

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(October 27, 2016) Report from the Chief Corporate Officer on Request for Authorization to Negotiate and Enter into a New Smart Commute Agreement with Metrolinx
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-97980.pdf)


PE15.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 43 

Morningside Park Parking Lot Capacity
Origin
(October 24, 2016) Letter from Councillor Paul Ainslie, Ward 43, Scarborough-East
Recommendations

Councillor Paul Ainslie recommends that:

 

1.  The General Manager of Parks, Forestry and Recreation:

 

a.  Explore options to increase parking at Morningside Park located at 390 Morningside Avenue, Scarborough, including the option of a partnership with the Toronto District School Board to allow Morningside Park patrons to park in the West Hill Collegiate parking lot.

 

b.  Report back to the Parks and Environment Committee on January 5, 2017 with the findings including associated costs.

Summary

This summer proved to be a landmark year for visitors in parks across the City of Toronto.  With the notable warm weather a record number of residents enjoyed their community parks emphasizing that investing in our open spaces is beneficial to the City as a whole.

 

Morningside Park covers 416.7 acres (1.686 km2), it includes Highland Creek, hiking trails, cross country Skiing trails, fire pits, a forested corridor, eroded cliffs, the salmon run, and an abundance of wildlife.  The park is frequented by a number of nature groups, enthusiast, Scouts Canada and the thousands who visit to enjoy the beautiful open space.  This September, The Scarborough Hospital also hosted their first annual obstacle competition "Brave TO" at Morningside Park bringing hundreds of participants in one afternoon.

 

The parking amenities at the park are however not reflective of the park's needs. Located in a valley bound by major roads most visitors drive or take public transit.  The 3 parking lots offer only 318 spaces.  The entrance to the park also does not offer the turning radius required for a public transit loop into a drop off area.  Currently public transit stops at the park entrance located on Morningside Avenue situated 175.94 m (577.22 ft) from the first point of entry down a steep valley.  Walking can be difficult specifically in the winter months.

 

It would be beneficial to increase the number of parking spaces available at Morningside Park to accommodate the growing number of visitors, groups and events.

 

I respectfully ask the committee to support my recommendations.

Background Information
(October 24, 2016) Letter from Councillor Paul Ainslie on Morningside Park Parking Lot Capacity
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-97930.pdf)


PE15.6

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 30 

Legalizing a Dog Off Leash Area on Lands West of Greenwood Toronto Transit Commission Yards
Origin
(November 15, 2016) Letter from Councillor Paula Fletcher, Ward 30, Toronto-Danforth
Recommendations

Councillor Paula Fletcher recommends that:

 

1.  City Council, upon the City lands located along the westerly edge of the buffer area located to the west of the TTC Greenwood yards ( the subject lands) coming into the Operational Management of Parks, Forestry and Recreation; and upon the Pocket Community Association releasing the Agreement with the TTC related to the subject lands, approve the regularization of the long-standing use of the subject lands as a dog off-leash area and grandparent the subject lands, in current condition, as an existing, non-conforming dog off-leash area; and exclude it from use by commercial dog walkers.

Summary

For over 20 years residents of the Pocket have used the buffer area west of the 31 acre Greenwood Yards as an informal, unapproved off leash area without incident. Over the past 6 months the city, the TTC and the community have been grappling with ongoing enforcement issues related to off leash dogs in these lands.

 

This land is owned by the city and has been under the management of the TTC. There is an existing Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the local Pocket Community Association (PCA) that deals with community use. The community has long asked to formalize and legalize off leash activity in this area. As the property is under TTC management, this has not been possible.

 

For many months, I have been meeting with the TTC, the City, the PCA and members of the Pocket dog community to seek a solution.

 

With staff support, I am making the following recommendation to Committee which would:

 

-  bring the subject property back to the City under the management of Parks;

 

-  grandparent the subject property; and

 

-  formalize the use as an existing, non-conforming Dogs Off Leash Area (DOLA).

 

Municipal Licensing and Standards has agreed to be responsible for enforcement in this location to ensure it complies with Parks Bylaw Chapter 608.

Background Information
(November 15, 2016) Letter from Councillor Paula Fletcher on Legalizing a Dog Off Leash Area on Lands West of Greenwood TTC Yards
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-98406.pdf)

Communications
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Geoff Hadrill (PE.New.PE15.6.1)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Cheryl Woodman (PE.New.PE15.6.2)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Andrew Muller (PE.New.PE15.6.3)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Donald Smith (PE.New.PE15.6.4)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Terra Page (PE.New.PE15.6.5)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Erin Kern (PE.New.PE15.6.6)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Kim Barnes (PE.New.PE15.6.7)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Katia Rodrigues (PE.New.PE15.6.8)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Leah Hutchinson (PE.New.PE15.6.9)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Rob Drynan (PE.New.PE15.6.10)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Heather Harding (PE.New.PE15.6.11)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Rishi, Claire, Celeste, Nala, and Brie Lukka (PE.New.PE15.6.12)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Patrice Brennan (PE.New.PE15.6.13)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Jeff Otto (PE.New.PE15.6.14)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Elizabeth Dhuey (PE.New.PE15.6.15)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Ben Goldberg (PE.New.PE15.6.16)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Steve Marks (PE.New.PE15.6.17)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Lisa Gilbert (PE.New.PE15.6.18)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Amanda Smith (PE.New.PE15.6.19)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Jin Huh (PE.New.PE15.6.20)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Laura Lavalley (PE.New.PE15.6.21)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Andrew Warner (PE.New.PEE15.6.22)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Rolfe S. Jones (PE.New.PE15.6.23)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Jennie Perry (PE.New.PE15.6.24)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Michelle Welsh (PE.New.PE15.6.25)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Liz Hood (PE.New.PE15.6.26)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Graham Withers (PE.New.PE15.6.27)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Lorrie (PE.New.PE15.6.28)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Ross Lashbrook (PE.New.PE15.6.29)
(November 15, 2016) E-mail from Nicole Sheehy (PE.New.PE15.6.30)
(November 16, 2016) E-mail from Lise Lotter (PE.New.PE15.6.31)
(November 16, 2016) E-mail from Anne Comer (PE.New.PE15.6.32)
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PE15.7

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Black Walnut Trees in Toronto
Origin
(November 17, 2016) Letter from Councillor Sarah Doucette, Ward 13, Parkdale-High Park
Recommendations

Councillor Sarah Doucette recommends that:

 

1.  The General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation report to the February 27, 2017 Parks and Environment Committee meeting on the effects of exempting the black walnut tree from the City’s tree bylaw, with a focus on both the effects of community safety and the greater tree canopy.

Summary

The concerns from residents regarding the safety threat from of the black walnut tree has been increasing over the past few years. The size of the nut, the height of the tree, and the resin it produces have all been raised as concerns from the general public. Under the current tree bylaw, black walnut trees fall within the same standards as any native tree, without any form of protection to mitigate the damage by the nuts.

Background Information
(November 17, 2016) Letter from Councillor Sarah Doucette on Black Walnut Trees in Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2016/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-98435.pdf)