Agenda

Consolidated



Executive Committee


Meeting No. 11   Contact Julie Amoroso, Committee Administrator
Meeting Date Wednesday, December 11, 2019
  Phone 416-392-4666
Start Time 9:30 AM
  E-mail exc@toronto.ca
Location Committee Room 1, City Hall
  Chair   Mayor John Tory  


Executive Committee

Mayor John Tory (Chair)

Deputy Mayor Denzil Minnan-Wong (Vice Chair)

Councillor Paul Ainslie

Councillor Ana Bailão

Councillor Gary Crawford

Councillor Frances Nunziata

Councillor James Pasternak

Councillor Michael Thompson

 

Members of Council and Staff: Please keep this agenda and the accompanying material until the City Council meeting dealing with these matters has ended.

 

Special Assistance for Members of the Public: City staff can arrange for special assistance with some advance notice. If you need special assistance, please call 416-392-4666, TTY 416-338-0889 or e-mail exc@toronto.ca.

 

Closed Meeting Requirements: If the Executive Committee wants to meet in closed session (privately), a member of the committee must make a motion to do so and give the reason why the Committee has to meet privately (City of Toronto Act, 2006).

 

Notice to People Writing or making presentations to the Executive Committee: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City's website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it - such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address - available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

 

Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view. If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast. Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

 

If you want to learn more about why and how the City collects your information, write to the City Clerk's Office, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto ON M5H 2N2 or by calling 416-392-4666. 

 


 

toronto.ca/council

 

This agenda and any supplementary materials submitted to the City Clerk can be found online at www.toronto.ca/council. Visit the website for access to all agendas, reports, decisions and minutes of City Council and its committees. Items with original signatures are kept on file with the City Clerk's Office and are available for viewing.   

 

 

Declarations of Interest under the Municipal Conflict of Interest Act

 

Confirmation of Minutes - November 14, 2019

 

Speakers/Presentations - A complete list will be distributed at the meeting.

 

Communications/Reports

EX11.1

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Value-Based Outcomes Review: Findings
Origin
(November 27, 2019) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
Recommendations

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer recommends that:  

 

1.  City Council receive this report for information

Summary

This report transmits the findings of the recently completed Value-Based Outcomes Review, conducted on behalf of the City of Toronto. The Value-Based Outcomes Review analysis and findings will inform the City's strategy for modernizing our financial decision-making to achieve Council's priorities and long-term financial sustainability.

 

Toronto plays a pivotal role in the region, province and country. The City is a magnet for immigration and economic growth. It delivers key services that provide enormous regional and national economic and social benefit. Toronto is the fastest growing city in North America and part of the second fastest growing region -- the City grew by 77,000 residents in the last year, and nearly 400,000 over the past 10 years. The Toronto Census Metropolitan Area's Gross Domestic Product is comparable to each of the provinces of Alberta and Quebec and represents 18.5 percent of national Gross Domestic Product. Within Ontario, Toronto and the surrounding area have been responsible for substantially all job growth dating back to 2003.

 

Over successive terms, the City's finances have been heavily relied upon to meet this growth and accompanying regional demand for services such as public housing, transit and transportation, and social services. As the Value-Based Outcomes Review highlights, the City does so without contributions towards operating expenses from a regional tax or rate base. This creates a significant pressure on the City to manage. The solutions to the City's unique pressures will require partnerships with other governments, including approaches to fairly fund city services and infrastructure which provide regional benefits.

 

The Value-Based Outcomes Review analysed actual spending by City divisions and major agencies from 2015 to 2018 with the goal of finding service delivery efficiencies, improving the value of services, and addressing long-standing challenges that have hindered previous transformation efforts. Funding for the Value-Based Outcomes Review was supported by the Province's Audit and Accountability Fund. Consistent with the Fund's requirements, the Value-Based Outcomes Review was used to explore efficiencies while preserving service levels.

 

In addition to new analysis, the review also validates a number of structural financial risks identified by previous City Managers and Chief Financial Officers. The City has developed a roadmap to address many of these risks through its financial management and operations modernization strategy, while planning for additional, intentional management to achieve progress over the next several years.

 

Key risks identified in the Value-Based Outcomes Review:

 

- Assessment of financial information has been made assuming service levels are maintained.

 

- The current capital plan is based on a set of assumptions which need to be reviewed. These assumptions include the estimates and timing of capital expenditures in addition to the funding requirements.

 

- The City must address financial challenges surrounding its 10-year capital plan

 

- Based on the current state of the capital plan the City faces immediate financial challenges.

 

- The City's capital plan must address its achievability and affordability. This is driven by assumptions about the amount of capital work the City is able to deliver in a given year and the forecasted cash flow required to fund the capital plan.

 

- The municipal costs associated with the growth of 170,000 residents from 2015 to 2018 have been managed largely through efficiencies.

 

- The Value-Based Outcomes Review identifies transformation opportunities that will contribute to funding growth in the future.
 

Opportunities identified in the Value-Based Outcomes Review related to moving the City towards financial sustainability include:

 

- Budgets and systems which create a true multi-year financial view focused on outcomes,

 

- Amended accountability for the fiscal plan including ownership of corporate savings and the capital plan,

 

- Clarity in the roles and responsibilities of City Council, the City's leadership, divisions and agencies,

 

- Changes which allow the City's leadership to adjust headcount to achieve outcomes within budget,

 

- Allocating savings to be used for transformation projects,

 

- Reengineering business processes to maximize the value of investments, and

 

- Mandated corporate programs across all divisions and agencies to better realize efficiencies and savings.

 

- In addition, there are opportunities to achieve efficiencies and improve value of services. These opportunities have been categorized by the consultant as: collection and enforcement; productivity; workforce optimization; alternative business models; and, infrastructure and asset management.
 

Undertaking the Value-Based Outcomes Review provided the City with additional insights and data. The findings of the review will support the Senior Leadership's commitment to achieve City Council's priorities and directions over the next several years, informed by sound, transparent and accountable financial management.

 

Actions currently underway to address the City's financial sustainability have been confirmed by the Value-Based Outcomes Review recommendations, such as modernizing the budget process, transforming financial systems, improving capital asset management, improving capital planning, exploring alternative service delivery, and improving procurement.

 

The Senior Leadership will bring forward opportunities identified in the Value-Based Outcomes Review that require Council authority in the 2020 budget process or later in the Council term as appropriate.

Financial Impact

The Value-Based Outcomes Review identifies efficiencies that will inform the City's strategies to find savings and improve value for residents and businesses.

 

Data from the Value-Based Outcomes Review analysis identifies that the City's ability to fund the cost of population growth through efficiencies will not be sufficient without changes to the way the City operates and underlying financial drivers, including capital planning, management and financing.

Background Information
(November 27, 2019) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer on Value-Based Outcomes Review: Findings
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140710.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Value-Based Outcomes Review: A Fiscal Modernization Agenda for the City of Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140893.pdf)

(December 11, 2019) Presentation from the City Manager and the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer on State of the City and Value-Based Outcomes Review
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-141001.pdf)

Communications
(December 9, 2019) Letter from Dave Wilkes, Building Industry and Land Development Association (EX.Supp.EX11.1.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/comm/communicationfile-99655.pdf)

(December 9, 2019) Submission from Andrew Krystal, Carpenters of Ontario (EX.Supp.EX11.1.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/comm/communicationfile-99657.pdf)

(December 10, 2019) Letter from Hillary Marshall, Greater Toronto Airports Authority (EX.Supp.EX11.1.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/comm/communicationfile-99686.pdf)

(December 10, 2019) Letter from James St. John, Central Ontario Building Trades (EX.Supp.EX11.1.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/comm/communicationfile-99687.pdf)

(December 11, 2019) Letter from Alana Powell, Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario (EX.New.EX11.1.5)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/comm/communicationfile-99672.pdf)

(December 11, 2019) Submission from Dave Mitchell, Canadian Union of Public Employees (EX.New.EX11.1.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/comm/communicationfile-99674.pdf)


EX11.2

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

2020 Rate Supported Budgets - 2020 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees
Public Notice Given
Origin
(November 25, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee
Recommendations

The Budget Committee recommends that:

 

Rates and Fees

 

1.  City Council adopt:

 

a.  effective January 1, 2020, the combined water and wastewater consumption rates charged to metered consumers as shown below and in Appendix C to the report (November 8, 2019) from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and the General Manager, Toronto Water titled "2020 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees";

 


Annual Consumption

Paid on or before the due date, $/m3

Paid after the due date, $/m3

Block 1 - All consumers of water, including the first 5,000 cubic metres per year consumed by Industrial users ("Block 1 rate")

 

4.0735

4.2878

Block 2 - Industrial process – use water consumption over 5,000 cubic metres per year, representing a 30 percent reduction from the Block 1 Rate ("Block 2 rate')

 

2.8514

3.0014

 

b.  effective January 1, 2020, an increase of 3.0 percent to the water and wastewater consumption rates (paid on or before the due date) charged to flat rate consumers, as set out in Appendix C attached to the report (November 8, 2019) from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and the General Manager, Toronto Water titled "2020 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees"; and

 
c.  effective January 1, 2020, the water and wastewater service fees, as set out in Appendix C to the report (November 8, 2019) from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and the General Manager, Toronto Water titled "2020 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees". 

 

2.  With respect to assistance for low-income seniors and low-income disabled persons, City Council:

 

a.  effective January 1, 2020, set the water rebate for eligible low-income  seniors and low-income disabled persons at a rate of $1.2221 /m3, representing a 30 percent reduction from the Block 1 rate (paid on or before the due date).

 

3.  City Council authorize the necessary amendments to Municipal Code Chapter 849 – Water and Sewage Services and Utility Bill to add the following eligibility criteria for utility billing adjustments to water accounts for uncontrollable and unexplainable consumption increases as set out in §849 -31 F and §849 -31 G and defined in §849 -26:

 
a.  the customer requesting the adjustment must be the owner of the property, which is the subject of the water account and corresponding utility bill, ("Property") and reside at the Property for a minimum of one year immediately preceding the consumption event and request for an adjustment; and

 
b.  the Property must not be tenanted.

 

4.  City Council authorize that the necessary amendments be made to Municipal Code Chapter 441 - Fees and Charges, Municipal Code, Chapter 849 - Water and Sewage Services and Utility Bill, Municipal Code Chapter 851 - Water Supply, and Municipal Code Chapter 681- Sewers, and any other necessary Municipal Code Chapters as may be required, to give effect to Council's decision.

 

5.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to introduce any necessary Bills required to give effect to Council's decision and authorize the City Solicitor to make any necessary clarifications, refinements, including stylistic, format and organization, minor modifications, technical amendments or by-law amendments as may be identified by the City Solicitor, the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and the General Manager, Toronto Water.

 

Operating Budget

 

6.  City Council approve the 2020 Staff Recommended Operating Budget for Toronto Water of $469.217 million gross, $1.390 billion revenue, and $921.210 million net capital-from-current contribution for the following services:

 

 

 

Service:

Gross

Revenue

Capital-from-current Contribution

             ($000s)

($000s)

($000s)

Water Treatment & Supply

203,086.79

614,536.56

411,449.77

Wastewater Collection & Treatment

233,866.05

770,138.43

536,252.38

Stormwater Management

32,244.18

5,752.09

-26,492.09

Total Program Budget

469,217.02

1,390,427.08

921,210.06

 

7.  City Council approve the 2020 staff complement of 1,820.3 positions, comprising of 95 capital positions and 1,725.3 operating positions.

 

Capital Budget

 

8.  City Council approve the 2020 Staff Recommended Capital Budget for Toronto Water with cash flows and future year commitments totaling $7.611 billion as detailed by project in Appendix 5a to the 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Water.

 

9.  City Council approve the 2021-2029 Staff Recommended Capital Plan for Toronto Water totalling $6.877 billion in project estimates as detailed by project in Appendix 5b to the 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Water.

 

10.  City Council request that all sub-projects with third party financing be approved conditionally, subject to the receipt of such financing in 2020 and if such funding is not forthcoming, their priority and funding be reassessed by City Council relative to other City-financed priorities and needs.

 

Service Levels

 

11.  City Council approve the 2020 service levels for Toronto Water as outlined in Appendix 1 to the report (November 12, 2019) from the General Manager, Toronto Water titled "Recommended 2020 Service Levels – Toronto Water".

 

 Stakeholder Consultations

 

12.  City Council authorize the General Manager, Toronto Water, in consultation with the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, to undertake stakeholder consultation with water users to determine what, if any, water fees and charges, programs or other measures designed to support business retention, economic growth, investment and employment, Toronto Water might recommend to City Council in furtherance of the objectives of the City's economic competitiveness strategy and the City's resilience strategy. Such consultation to include, but not be limited to, consideration of the following:

 

a.  current support programs offered by Toronto Water for Industrial, Commercial and Institutional  customers;

 

b.  related municipal best practices in other jurisdictions;

 

c.  current policies and practices under Municipal Code Chapter 681, Sewers, with a view to identifying any potential opportunities for the implementation of further administrative efficiencies;

 

d.  possible dedicated stormwater management charge for owners of commercial and retail parking lots to recover the serviceable costs of the collection, transmittal and treatment of stormwater run-off generated by those parking lots;

 

e. the possible decoupling of Industrial and Commercial customers’ water use rate from costs associated with storm water management, in an effort to promote more transparent and equitable water rates, reduce the cost of water consumption to large consumers, while recovering the full serviceable costs of the collection, transmittal and treatment of storm water run-off generated by different properties; and

 

f. possible incentives for industrial and commercial water customers to undertake sustainable storm water and flood management solutions, including, but not limited to, storm water management charge financial credit programs and green infrastructure funding.

  

13.  City Council request the General Manager, Toronto Water, in consultation with the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture to report back to the Infrastructure and Environment Committee on the outcome of the stakeholder consultation once completed and recommendations, if any, for changes to water fees and charges, programs or other measures in advance of the 2021 Budget process.

 

Other

 

14.  City Council request the General Manager, Toronto Water, in consultation with relevant City Divisions, to report to the Budget Committee in 2020 through Capital Variance Reports, on the potential to assist with funding the Ravine Strategy implementation through an in-year adjustment to the Toronto Water Capital budget.

Summary

This report presents the recommended 2020 water and wastewater consumption rates and service fees arising from the concurrent adoption by City Council of the recommended 2020 Toronto Water Operating and Capital Budgets. This report also recommends the adoption by City Council of additional eligibility criteria related to utility billing adjustments to water accounts for uncontrollable and unexplainable consumption increases under Municipal Code Chapter 849.  

 

In accordance with the City Council 10 year capital plan approved in 2015, this report recommends a 3.0 percent water and wastewater consumption rate increase, effective January 1, 2020.  In addition, this report recommends inflationary fee increases for certain existing water and wastewater service fees, reflecting cost recovery for these services.  

 

The recommended 2020 water and wastewater consumption rates and service fees will allow the Toronto Water Program to remain fully self-funded and financially stable, with both operating and capital needs being met without excessive year-over-year fluctuations in pricing over the long term.

Background Information
(November 25, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee on 2020 Rate Supported Budgets - 2020 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140585.pdf)

(November 8, 2019) Report and Appendix A from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and the General Manager, Toronto Water on 2020 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140579.pdf)

Appendix B - 2019 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140570.pdf)

Appendix C - 2019 Water and Wastewater Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140571.pdf)

(November 8, 2019) 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Water
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140580.pdf)

Attachment 1 to 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Water - 10 Year Capital Budget and Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140582.pdf)

Attachment 2 to 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Water - 10 Year Capital Budget and Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140578.pdf)

(November 12, 2019) Report and Attachment 1 from the General Manager, Toronto Water on Recommended 2020 Service Levels - Toronto Water
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140581.pdf)

(November 15, 2019) Notice of Public Meeting - 2020 Rate Supported Budgets - 2020 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Certain Water and Wastewater Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140572.pdf)

Notice of Public Meeting - 2020 Rate Supported Budgets - Appendix A - 2020 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Certain Water and Wastewater Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140574.pdf)

Notice of Public Meeting - 2020 Rate Supported Budgets - Appendix B - 2020 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Certain Water and Wastewater Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140575.pdf)

(November 15, 2019) Briefing Note 1 - 2020 Capital Budget Basement Flooding Protection Program - Program Status Update and Project List - 2020 to 2024
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140576.pdf)

(November 15, 2019) Attachment A to Briefing Note 1 - 2020 Capital Budget Basement Flooding Protection Program - Program Status Update and Project List - 2020 to 2024
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140573.pdf)

(November 15, 2019) Revised Attachment B to Briefing Note 1 - 2020 Capital Budget Basement Flooding Protection Program - Program Status Update and Project List - 2020 to 2024
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140577.pdf)

Communications
(December 10, 2019) Letter from Heather Marshall, Toronto Environmental Alliance (EX.New.EX11.2.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/comm/communicationfile-99691.pdf)


2a Proposed Stakeholder Consultation with Water Users in Furtherance of the City's Economic Competitiveness Strategy
Origin
(November 12, 2019) Report from the General Manager, Toronto Water, and the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Recommendations

The General Manager, Toronto Water, and the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, recommend that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the General Manager, Toronto Water, in consultation with the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, to undertake stakeholder consultation with water users to determine what, if any, water fees and charges, programs or other measures designed to support business retention, economic growth, investment and employment, Toronto Water might recommend to City Council in furtherance of the objectives of the City's economic competitiveness strategy and that such consultation include, but not be limited to, a consideration of the following:

 

a.  current support programs offered by Toronto Water for Industrial, Commercial and Institutional  customers;

 

b.  related municipal best practices in other jurisdictions;

 

c.  current policies and practices under the Municipal Code Chapter 681, Sewers By-law, with a view to identifying any potential opportunities for the implementation of further administrative efficiencies; and

 

d.  possible dedicated stormwater management charge for owners of commercial and retail parking lots to recover the serviceable costs of the collection, transmittal and treatment of stormwater run-off generated by those parking lots.

 

2.  City Council request that the General Manager, Toronto Water, in consultation with the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, report back to the Infrastructure and Environment Committee on the outcome of the stakeholder consultation once completed.

Summary

This report is in response to an earlier City Council direction to report to the Budget Committee as part of the 2020 Budget Process.  The report seeks City Council authority to undertake consultation with various stakeholders and the public to determine what, if any, water fees and charges, programs or other measure designed to support business retention, economic growth, investment and employment, Toronto Water might recommend to City Council in furtherance of the objectives of the City's economic competitiveness strategy.  It is further recommended that the General Manager, Toronto Water, in consultation with the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, report back to the Infrastructure and Environment Committee on the outcome of the stakeholder consultation once completed.

Background Information
(November 12, 2019) Report from the General Manager, Toronto Water, and the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Proposed Stakeholder Consultation with Water Users in Furtherance of the City's Economic Competitiveness Strategy
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140583.pdf)


EX11.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

2020 Rate Supported Budgets - Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2020 Solid Waste Rates and Fees
Public Notice Given
Origin
(November 25, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee
Recommendations

The Budget Committee recommends that:

 

Rates and Fees

 

1.  City Council adopt the 2020 Solid Waste Management Services Rates and Fees as set out in Appendix A to the report (November 12, 2019) from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services titled "2020 Rate Supported Budgets – Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2020 Solid Waste Rates and Fees", all effective as of January 1, 2020.

 

2.  City Council authorize that the necessary amendments be made to Municipal Code Chapter 441 – Fees and Charges, and any other necessary Municipal Code Chapters as may be required to give effect to Council's decision.

 

3.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to introduce any necessary Bills required to give effect to Council's decision and authorize the City Solicitor to make any necessary refinements, including stylistic, format and organization, as may be identified by the City Solicitor, the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer, and the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services.

 

4.  City Council request the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and/or designate to continue consulting and negotiating with provincial officials to ensure inclusion of the City's priorities in any new anticipated waste diversion regulations or policy statements that implement the Resource Recovery and Circular Economy Act, 2016, and the Waste Diversion Transition Act, 2016.

 

5.  City Council authorize the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and/or designate until the end of 2025, to negotiate and enter into any new agreements, amendments of existing agreements, or acknowledgements - including on the basis of a non-competitive procurement under Municipal Code, Chapter 195, Purchasing necessary in connection with the efforts indicated in Recommendation 4 above -  including advocacy, business transformation, financial analysis, or receipt of funding on terms and conditions satisfactory to the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and each in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

 

6.  City Council authorize the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and/or designate, to negotiate and enter into a contract extension agreement with CRA Landfill Operations Limited to provide landfill operations, management and construction services for a term not to exceed 10 years, with the specific requirements that landfill compaction ratio be increased, a lower annual guaranteed minimum tonnage be implemented and efficiencies be developed to reduce site costs on terms and conditions satisfactory to the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

 

7.   City Council authorize the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and/or designate, to negotiate and enter into any new agreements, amendments of existing agreements, or acknowledgements - including on the basis of a non-competitive procurement under Municipal Code Chapter 195, Purchasing - necessary in connection with the efforts to produce, manage, market, distribute, use and sell Renewable Natural Gas and other environmental attributes associated with Renewable Natural Gas production on terms and conditions satisfactory to the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and each in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor and the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management.

 

8.  City Council direct that all the rates, fees and charges set out in Appendix A to the report (November 12, 2019) from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services titled "2020 Rate Supported Budgets – Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2020 Solid Waste Rates and Fees", adopted by Council in Recommendation 1 above, continue in full force and effect until such time as they are amended or repealed by City Council.

 

Operating Budget

 

9.   City Council approve the 2020 Staff Recommended Operating Budget for Solid Waste Management Services of $360.1 million gross, $18.8 million net for the following services:

 

Service:

 

Gross

 

Revenue

 

Capital from-current Contribution

 

($000s)

($000s)

($000s)

City Beautification

38,123.1

1,564.9

-36,558.2

Residual Management

39,562.3

8,843.3

-30,719.0

Solid Waste Collection & Transfer

126,904.9

322,156.9

195,252.0

Solid Waste Education & Enforcement

5,655.2

3.5

-5,651.7

Solid Waste Processing & Transport

149,858.1

46,335.3

-103,522.8

Total Program Budget

360,103.6

     378,903.9

   18,800.2

 

10.  City Council approve the 2020 staff complement for Solid Waste Management Services of 1,128.3 positions, comprising 50.4 capital positions and 1,077.9 operating positions.

 

11.  City Council approve the 2020 new user fees, technical adjustments to user fees, market rate user fee changes, rationalized user fees, and other fee changes above the inflationary adjusted rate for Solid Waste Management Services identified in Appendix 8 to the 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Solid Waste Management Services, for inclusion in the Municipal Code Chapter 441 “Fees and Charges”.

 

Capital Budget

 

12.  City Council approve 2020 Staff Recommended Capital Budget for Solid Waste Management Services with cash flows and future year commitments totaling $584.980 million as detailed by project in Appendix 5a to the 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Solid Waste Management Services.

 

13.  City Council approve the 2021-2029 Staff Recommended Capital Plan for Solid Waste Management Services totalling $183.131 million in project estimates as detailed by project in Appendix 5b to the 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Solid Waste Management Services.

 

Service Levels

 

14.  City Council approve the 2020 service levels for Solid Waste Management Services as outlined in Appendix 1 to the report (November 15, 2019) from the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services titled "Recommended 2020 Service Levels – Solid Waste Management Services".

Summary

This report outlines the recommended 2020 Solid Waste Management Services Rates and Fees arising from the adoption of the recommended 2020 Solid Waste Management Services Operating and Capital Budgets. The recommended rate and fee increases will vary based on customer group and are highlighted in Table 1. 

 

Table 1 - 2020 Recommended Rates and Fees Increases (Effective Jan. 1, 2020)

Customer Group

Percent Rate Increase

Comments

Multi-Residential

1.50 percent

Below Rate of Inflation

Single Family and Residential Units Above Commercial

2.50 percent

Rate of Inflation

Bag Tags, Bin Purchase

6.00 percent

Same as Commercial

Commercial, Divisions, Agencies and Corporations, Schools

6.00 percent

Equivalent increase to 2019

Blended Rate

2.45 percent

Rate of Inflation

 

The 2020 Recommended Operating Budget is $360.104 million, an increase of $10.169 million or 2.9 percent over 2019 plus $18.800 million contribution to the Waste Management Reserve Fund all of which are offset by total revenues of $378.904 million.  The increase in operating expenditures is attributable to the increase in organic collection and processing costs due to volume and contractual inflation adjustments, start-up of the Dufferin Renewable Natural Gas and Ingram Compressed Natural Gas facilities, increase in debt principal and interest payments to fund the 10-Year Capital Budget and Plan.

 

The 2020 Recommended Capital Budget is $81.335 million which is comprised of $59.404 million in new 2020 funding and $21.931 million in funding carried forward from 2019 into 2020.  Key capital objectives and priorities for Solid Waste Management Services in the 2020 Capital Program are:

 

To safely and efficiently collect materials from 875,000 homes, business and public spaces by implementing Council's direction on health and safety by installing telematics solutions on vehicles in support of Vision Zero 2.0; In addition, a cornerstone of the Program is to manage 900,000 plus tonnes of material in an environmentally and fiscally sustainable manner by accelerating the development of the 3rd Anaerobic Digester; and

 
To continue to develop and invest in Renewable Natural Gas facilities and the purchase of Natural Gas Vehicles.  
 

The proposed 2.45 percent blended rate increase in Solid Waste Management Services Rates and Fees is in line with inflation and will generate $7.124 million in additional revenues necessary to maintain Council Approved service levels as well as improved and enhanced services in many areas, and fund the 2020 Recommended Capital Budget and 10-Year Capital Plan.

Background Information
(November 25, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee on 2020 Rate Supported Budgets - Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2020 Solid Waste Rates and Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140594.pdf)

(November 12, 2019) Revised Report and Appendix A and B from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services on 2020 Rate Supported Budgets - Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2020 Solid Waste Rates and Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140589.pdf)

2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Solid Waste Management Services
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140588.pdf)

Attachment 1 to 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Solid Waste Management Services - 10 Year Capital Budget and Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140590.pdf)

Attachment 2 to 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Solid Waste Management Services - 10 Year Capital Budget and Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140592.pdf)

(November 15, 2019) Report and Appendix A from the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services on Recommended 2020 Service Levels - Solid Waste Management Services
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140591.pdf)

(November 15, 2019) Notice of Public Meeting - 2020 Rate Supported Budgets - 2020 Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2020 Solid Waste Rates and Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140586.pdf)

Notice of Public Meeting - 2020 Rate Supported Budgets - Appendix A -2020 Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2020 Solid Waste Rates and Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140587.pdf)


EX11.4

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

2020 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Parking Authority
Public Notice Given
Confidential Attachment - Personal matters about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees, and labour relations or employee negotiations
Origin
(November 25, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee
Recommendations

The Budget Committee recommends that:

 

Operating Budget

 

1.  City Council approve the 2020 Operating Budget for Toronto Parking Authority of $101.8 million gross, ($70.1 million) net for the following services:

 

Service:

             Gross              ($000s)

             Revenue

($000s)

             Net

($000s)

On-Street Parking

11,662.4

63,864.0

(52,201.6)

Off-Street Parking

83,689.6

101,587.9

(17,898.3)

Bike Share Program

6,420.0

6,420.0

-

Total Program Budget

101,772.0

171,871.9

   (70,099.9)

 

2.  City Council approve the 2020 staff complement for Toronto Parking Authority of 326.5 operating positions.

 

Capital Budget

 

3.  City Council approve the 2020 Staff Recommended Capital Budget and Plan for Toronto Parking Authority with cash flows and future year commitments totalling $203.666 million as detailed by project and by year in Appendix 5a to the 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Parking Authority.

 

4.  City Council approve the new 2021-2029 Staff Recommended Capital Plan for Toronto Parking Authority totaling $151.6 million in project estimates as detailed by project in Appendix to the 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes: Toronto Parking Authority.

 

Service Levels

 

5.  City Council approve the 2020 service levels for Toronto Parking Authority as outlined in Appendix 1 to the report (November 15, 2019) from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority titled "Recommended 2020 Service Levels – Toronto Parking Authority".

 

Other

 

6. City Council direct the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer, in consultation with the President, Toronto Parking Authority to report to the Budget Committee on an updated Income Sharing Renewal Agreement no later than December 31, 2020.

 

7. City Council extend the existing Income Sharing Agreement with the Toronto Parking Authority, which expires on December 31, 2019, until such time as City Council considers an updated Income Sharing Agreement.

 

8. City Council direct that Confidential Attachment 1 to the report (September 19, 2019) from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority remain confidential in its entirety, as it pertains to personal matters about identifiable individuals, including municipal or local board employees, and labour relations or employee negotiations.

Summary

The City Manager and the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer have submitted recommendations for the 2020 Recommended Operating Budget and 2021 - 2029 Recommended Capital Budget and Plan for Toronto Parking Authority.

Background Information
(November 25, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee on 2020 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Parking Authority
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140607.pdf)

2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Parking Authority
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140543.pdf)

Attachment 1 to 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Parking Authority - 10 Year Capital Budget and Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140605.pdf)

Attachment 2 to 2020 Staff Recommended Capital and Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Parking Authority - 10 Year Capital Budget and Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140606.pdf)

(November 15, 2019) Revised Report and Appendix 1 from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority on Recommended 2020 Service Levels - Toronto Parking Authority
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140604.pdf)

(November 15, 2019) Public Notice - Toronto Parking Authority - 2020 Recommended Operating Budget, 2020 Recommended Capital Budget and 2021 - 2029 Recommended Capital Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140542.pdf)


4a Parking Market Analysis for 2020 Toronto Parking Authority Budget Submission
Origin
(September 20, 2019) Letter from the Board of Directors of the Toronto Parking Authority
Summary

At its meeting of  September, 20, 2019, the Board of Directors of the Toronto Parking Authority:

 

1.  Referred the report (September 18, 2019) from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority, to the Budget Committee for consideration during the 2020 budget process

 

This report responds to the request from Toronto City Council to the President of Toronto Parking Authority to include a parking market analysis, annually, as part of its budget submission.

 

The parking market served by Toronto Parking Authority consists of two main service streams: the on-street program and off-street program. The on-street parking stream includes all of the approximately 19,000 paid on-street parking spaces, which accept payment by way of parking machines or through the Green P App, and a few legacy single-space parking meters. The comprehensive parking market analysis of this on-street program is undertaken for all locations once every three years when the rates and rules of operation are reviewed and aligned with utilization levels and to ensure equitable treatment of all areas of the city. The last comprehensive review was undertaken in October 2017. Implementation was completed in late 2018. The next comprehensive review is scheduled for the middle of 2020.

 

 In addition to the comprehensive review, in-year adjustments are undertaken as circumstances warrant. On-street parking is competitively priced with Toronto Parking Authority off-street pricing, where applicable, and to below prices set by private parking operators. On-street parking is almost always the first choice of short-stay (under three hours) parkers.

 

Toronto Parking Authority also operates an extensive inventory of approximately 300 off-street parking facilities containing over 40,000 spaces, however, over one-third of these spaces are managed and operated by Toronto Parking Authority on behalf of other City departments or agencies, including City Real Estate Services, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, the Toronto Transit Commission, Exhibition Place, and the Toronto Community Housing Corporation. While consultation usually occurs, in most of these facilities, the parking fees are set by the department or agency and reflect their policy objectives. In addition, there are 26 locations where garages or surface locations are leased from public or private landowners. The facilities where rates are set by the Toronto Parking Authority Board of Directors are subject to a comprehensive annual rate review. The next comprehensive review is scheduled for November 2019 for implementation in January 2020. Each year, the comprehensive review includes surveys of rates being charged by private parking competitors located in the vicinity of Toronto Parking Authority parking facilities. All of the Toronto Parking Authority's large garages had competitors identified as part of the 2019 rate review.

 

The primary objective of Toronto Parking Authority's rate setting process is to achieve high usage levels in its facilities. Toronto Parking Authority would not normally change rates where usage levels are low or declining. Toronto Parking Authority's service mandate is to serve short-stay, high turnover parkers. These are the customers to the City's businesses. The Toronto Parking Authority only accommodates longer stay parkers where all short-stay parkers have been served and additional space is available in the facility. Toronto Parking Authority's rate setting practices reflect this service mandate by having short-stay rates lower than most competitor rates. There are many other factors which influence parking behaviour and choice of parking location. These include selecting other travel modes, road congestion, and general traffic issues in the vicinity of a given facility and general economic conditions, either local to an area or on a more widespread basis.

 

There was an extensive series of rate adjustments implemented in early 2019 which impacted 93 of  Toronto Parking Authority's approximately 230 off-street locations. This report analyzes the effect that these price changes had in terms of usage levels and parking revenues as well as calculating the price elasticity associated with the changes. In general, with the exception of eight Toronto Parking Authority garages in the core commercial areas, the price adjustments resulted in no change in overall parking transactions in the 93 locations where they were implemented and generated 5.52 percent in additional revenue at these locations. Additional rate change recommendations will be considered by Toronto Parking Authority Board of Directors at their November 25, 2019 meeting. Toronto Parking Authority is projecting a total increase in 2019 revenues across all revenue streams of 2.4 percent for 2019 over 2018. This represents the results of the revenue increases at the car parks referenced in this report as well as car parks where rates were not increased and performance of the on-street metered parking program. There is also a brief description of the 2019 competitor rate analysis which is currently underway. Overall, private sector competitors were identified for the car parks in the core commercial areas, including the downtown, the midtown centers, and North York Centre. Results indicate that, as per Toronto Parking Authority policy, half-hour rates at Toronto Parking Authority locations are in most cases lower than the private sector while daily rates tend to be at, or near, the level of competitors.

Background Information
(September 20, 2019) Letter from the Toronto Parking Authority on Parking Market Analysis for 2020 Toronto Parking Authority Budget Submission
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140608.pdf)

(September 18, 2019) Report and Attachments A and B from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority on Parking Market Analysis for 2020 Toronto Parking Authority Budget Submission
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140609.pdf)


4b Feasibility and Financial Impact of Extending Bike Share Toronto Travel Times and Ridership Impact from the Implementation of the Richmond-Adelaide and Bloor Street West Bike Lanes
Origin
(September 20, 2019) Letter from the Board of Directors of the Toronto Parking Authority
Summary

At its meeting of  September, 20, 2019, the Board of Directors of the Toronto Parking Authority:

 

1.  Referred the report (September 6, 2019) from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority, to the Budget Committee for consideration during the 2020 budget process.

 

This report responds to City Council's request to the Toronto Parking Authority Board to request the President, Toronto Parking Authority, to report to the Budget Committee on the following for consideration prior to the 2020 budget process:

 

a.  ridership changes at Bike Share stations directly adjacent to the Richmond/Adelaide and Bloor Street West bike lanes, from before implementation to implementation; and

 

b.  the feasibility and financial impact of extending Bike Share travel times from 30 minutes to 45 minutes for annual members.

Background Information
(September 20, 2019) Letter from the Toronto Parking Authority on Feasibility and Financial Impact of Extending Bike Share Toronto Travel Times and Ridership Impact from the Implementation of the Richmond-Adelaide and Bloor Street West Bike Lanes
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140611.pdf)

(September 6, 2019) Report and Attachments 1-6 from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority on Feasibility and Financial Impact of Extending Bike Share Toronto Travel Times and Ridership Impact from the Implementation of the Richmond-Adelaide and Bloor Street West Bike Lanes
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140612.pdf)


4c Toronto Parking Authority - 2020 Operating Budget and 2020-2029 Capital Budget
Confidential Attachment - Personal matters about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees, and labour relations or employee negotiations
Origin
(September 20, 2019) Letter from the Board of Directors of the Toronto Parking Authority
Summary

At its meeting of  September, 20, 2019, the Board of Directors of the Toronto Parking Authority:

 

1.  Approved the 2020 Operating Budget and 2020-2029 Capital Budget for Toronto Parking Authority, as outlined in the report (September 10, 2019) from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority.

 

2.  Forwarded the 2020 Operating Budget and 2020-2029 Capital Budget for Toronto Parking Authority, as outlined in the report (September 10, 2019) from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority, to City Council for consideration during the 2020 budget process.

 

3.  Directed that the confidential information contained in Confidential Attachment 1 to the report (September 19, 2019) from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority, remain confidential in its entirety, as it pertains to personal matters about identifiable individuals, including municipal or local board employees, and labour relations or employee negotiations.

 

This report presents the 2020 Operating Budget and 2020-2029 Capital Budget to the Board of Directors of Toronto Parking Authority for approval, as referenced in Attachment 1 to the report dated September 10, 2019 (budgetTO 2020 Administrative Review - Toronto Parking Authority 2020 Operating Budget and 2020-2029 Capital Budget and Plan Submission).

Background Information
(September 20, 2019) Letter from the Toronto Parking Authority on Toronto Parking Authority - 2020 Operating Budget and 2020-2029 Capital Budget
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140615.pdf)

(September 10, 2019) Report from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority on Toronto Parking Authority - 2020 Operating Budget and 2020-2029 Capital Budget
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140616.pdf)

Attachment 1 - budgetTO 2020 Administrative Review - Toronto Parking Authority 2020 Operating Budget and 2020-2029 Capital Budget and Plan Submission
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140617.pdf)

(September 19, 2019) Report from the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority on Additional Information on Toronto Parking Authority - 2020 Operating Budget
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140618.pdf)

Confidential Attachment 1 - Additional Information Regarding Administration and Payroll Expenses

EX11.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Toronto Public Art Strategy (2020-2030)
Origin
(November 26, 2019) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning and the General Manager, Transportation Services
Recommendations

The General Manager, Economic Development and Culture; the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning and the General Manager, Transportation Services, recommend that:  

 

1.  City Council adopt the Toronto Public Art Strategy (2020-2030), included as Attachment 1 to this report.

 

2.  City Council direct the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, and the General Manager, Transportation Services, in consultation with other impacted City divisions, to report to the Executive Committee in the third quarter of 2020 with a detailed implementation plan for the Toronto Public Art Strategy (2020-2030).

 

3.  City Council direct the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, in consultation with the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, and the General Manager, Transportation Services, to report to the Economic and Community Development Committee in the third quarter of 2020 with a programming and engagement plan for the Year of Public Art.

 

4.  City Council direct the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, in consultation with the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, and the General Manager, Transportation Services, to submit costs related to the Year of Public Art for consideration as part of the 2020, 2021 and 2022 budget processes.

 

5.  City Council approve a one-year moratorium on accepting proposals for new donations of permanent works through the City's Public Art and Monuments Donations Policy, effective as of the approval of this recommendation by City Council.

Summary

The Toronto Public Art Strategy (2020-2030) sets out a ten-year plan to enhance the City's commitment to public art. The strategy includes 21 actions to advance public art across the city, and heighten the impact of the City's public art programs for the benefit of all residents and visitors.

 

Following decades of commitment and leadership by the City, private developers, and community partners, Toronto is enriched by more than 1,500 works of public art that engage residents and visitors with the history, diversity, creativity and aspirations of our city. Public art has been leveraged as a tool for community development, civic engagement, and urban design, and has created significant opportunities for artists to advance their professional practice through high-profile public commissions.

 

The growth of public art in Toronto has been driven by the policies of the City of Toronto's Official Plan (section 3.1.4), and the strategic objectives of Council-endorsed plans such as the Graffiti Management Plan and the Culture Plan for the Creative City. To achieve the goals of these policies and plans, the City delivers three core public art programs – the City of Toronto Public Art and Monuments Collection, the Percent for Public Art Program, and StreetARToronto.

 

Together, these programs have had a major impact on the city's urban fabric, assembling a collection of public art that, in the number of works alone, is of international significance. At the same time, there is more to be done to ensure that the benefits of public art are felt city-wide, and to harness the potential of public art to advance broader city-building priorities, such as equity and inclusion, environmental resiliency, reconciliation with Indigenous communities, and place-making, among others. With a deliberate, ambitious vision, facilitated by greater and ongoing interdivisional collaboration, Toronto can be a global leader in public art.

 

Looking ahead, the City can build on its strong foundations to enhance the impact of public art for the benefit of all of Toronto. The Toronto Public Art Strategy seizes this opportunity by putting forward a vision to empower creativity and community, everywhere. This is a vision for a city committed to public art, accessible to all, that reinforces neighbourhood character, embraces excellence in design, and advances the careers of local artists.

 

The strategy is underpinned by a commitment to embed truth and reconciliation with Indigenous communities as foundational principles for public art. Not only is this commitment fundamental to addressing the deficit of Indigenous cultural representation in the public realm, but it also positions Toronto to build a collection of public art unlike any other in the world – one that is deeply connected to the cultural expression of Indigenous communities, and reflective of an aesthetic that is unique to our city.

 

The City will turn vision into action beginning with the Year of Public Art in 2021, a year-long celebration of art and community, and the first Toronto-wide programming initiative related to the new strategy. Planned highlights include a major expansion of Nuit Blanche to North York and Etobicoke, building on the success of the recent expansion to Scarborough; new funding for artists and community arts organizations to produce public art works city-wide in 2021, to be delivered by the Toronto Arts Council; and special programming partnerships with leading cultural institutions. The Year of Public Art will leave an enduring legacy through significant new commissions, increased support to artists working in the public realm, and by greatly diversifying the opportunities for meaningful engagement and interaction between artists, art and the public.

 

Lastly, this report recommends a one-year moratorium on accepting new donation proposals for permanent installations through the City's Public Art and Monuments Donations Policy, effective as of Council's approval of said recommendation. Staff are currently working with community partners to facilitate a wide range of public art and monuments donations. This includes identifying appropriate public land for donated works, and providing support throughout the competition, design and construction process. A temporary pause on accepting new proposals is needed in order to complete a backlog of current donation projects ahead of the Year of Public Art.

Financial Impact

Implementation of Toronto Public Art Strategy

 

Costs related to the implementation of the Toronto Public Art Strategy will be incurred over a ten-year period (2020-2030). No new resources are required to begin implementing the strategy in 2020. Resource implications for future years will need to be assessed. It is anticipated that most actions can be implemented within existing budgets, including by re-allocation within Divisional budgets where required, and by using future funding commitments for public art (including municipal capital funding allocated to public art; funding secured from private developments through the Percent for Public Art Program, administered by City Planning; and the annual program budget for StreetARToronto, managed by Transportation Services). Where applicable, any new initiatives requiring additional resources will be submitted for Council's consideration as part of future budget processes.

 

The strategy includes an action to develop consistent City-wide guidelines to apply the "percent for public art" policy to municipal capital projects, per existing direction in the City's Official Plan (section 3.1.4). It is anticipated that, once fully implemented, this action could result in an increase in the amount of municipal capital funding allocated to public art. The exact financial impact of this action cannot be determined until such time as the guidelines have been developed and approved by City Council. The associated financial impact for new capital public art projects will be considered as part of each annual budget submission in the Capital Budget for the appropriate divisions. Additional operating costs for the maintenance of new public art will be included as part of the future budget submissions in the Operating Budget for the appropriate Divisions.

 

Year of Public Art

 

One-time funding is required over three years (2020-22) in order to produce and deliver the Year of Public Art. Funding is required beginning in 2020 for start-up staffing and production costs, with the majority of programming and production costs being incurred in 2021. Wrap-up costs and legacy programming costs are anticipated for 2022.

 

Economic Development and Culture will submit a one-time funding request of $4.5 million in its Operating Budget over three years for Council's consideration as part of the 2020, 2021 and 2022 budget processes. Other Divisions may also incur costs related to the Year of Public Art. Such costs would be submitted by the appropriate Divisions for consideration as part of the budget process. Economic Development and Culture's funding request breaks down as follows:

 

Year

2020

2021

2022

Total

Cost

$1,500,000

$2,500,000

$500,000

$4,500,000

 

A commitment of City funding will be used to leverage additional third party support, such as cash and in-kind sponsorships, grants, and donations.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has been provided with the financial impacts associated with this report for review as part of the 2020 budget process.

Background Information
(November 26, 2019) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning and the General Manager, Transportation Services on Toronto Public Art Strategy (2020-2030)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140705.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Toronto Public Art Strategy (2020-2030)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140706.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Supplemental Jurisdictional Scan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140707.pdf)

Attachment 3 - "What We Heard" - Report on Community and Stakeholder Consultations
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140703.pdf)

Communications
(December 10, 2019) Submission from Tim Kocur and Katherine Hebb, The Waterfront Business Improvement Area (EX.New.EX11.5.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/comm/communicationfile-99671.pdf)


EX11.6

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 4 

Parkdale Hub Project - Feasibility Study
Confidential Attachment - The report deals with a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land by the City of Toronto
Origin
(December 5, 2019) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services and the Deputy City Manager, Community and Social Services
Recommendations

The Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services and the Deputy City Manager, Community and Social Services recommend that:  

 

1.  City Council direct CreateTO to lead and collaborate with City Real Estate Management, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, Toronto Public Library, Housing Secretariat, and Toronto Parking Authority in Phase 2 of the Parkdale Hub feasibility study, which will include the development of the following:

 

- Schematic design,
- Heritage impact assessment,
- Construction phasing study,
- Operations and collaboration framework,
- Community engagement strategy,
- Programming model,
- Affordable housing model,
- Environmental studies,
- Capital budget and financing model.
 

2.  City Council direct CreateTO to work with an architectural team to advance the schematic design for the Parkdale Hub site, with consideration to be given to the Conceptual Design and Massing Study shown in Attachment 4 to this report, with a view to initiating a rezoning process for the site.

 

3.  City Council direct CreateTO, to consult with community stakeholders, including Toronto Artscape Inc., in the development of Phase 2 of the Parkdale Hub feasibility study.  

 

4. City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services and the Deputy City Manager, Community and Social Services to proceed with Phase 2 of the Parkdale Hub feasibility study, within the overall budget of $0.461 million, from the following sources:

 

a.  $0.144 million from the Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing (XR2116), with a related increase to the 2020 Staff Recommended Operating Budget for Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, cost centre FH5417 in coordination with the Executive Director, Housing Secretariat for Council consideration through the 2020 Budget process; and

 

b.  $0.318 million from the 2019-2028 Council Approved Capital Budget and Plan for Facilities, Real Estate, Environment and Energy under the Strategic Projects – Feasibility capital project account (CCA266-01).

 

5.  City Council, subject to the adoption of Recommendation 6, authorize the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services and the Deputy City Manager, Community and Social Services, as part of the 2020 Budget process, to provide additional funding for Phase 2 of the Parkdale Hub feasibility study, within an overall additional budget of $0.247 million, from the following sources:

 

a. up to $0.162 million from the Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing (XR2116), with a related increase to the 2020 Staff Recommended Operating Budget for Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, cost centre FH5417 in coordination with the Executive Director, Housing Secretariat for Council consideration through the 2020 Budget process;

 

b. up to $0.085 million from the 2019-2028 Council Approved Capital Budget and Plan for Facilities, Real Estate, Environment and Energy under the Strategic Projects – Feasibility capital project account (CCA266-01).

 

6.  City Council authorize the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management and CreateTO to initiate negotiations to acquire the property specified in Confidential Attachment 1 (the "Additional Property") for affordable housing purposes as part of the Parkdale Hub project, on the basis that any resulting transaction will be subject to approval by Council with a report that identifies budgeted funds being available for such purposes.

 

7.  City Council direct CreateTO to examine opportunities to fund the acquisition of the Additional Property and to report back through the CreateTO Board on the feasibility of a strategic acquisition for the Parkdale Hub project no later than the second quarter of 2020, on the basis that any resulting transaction will be subject to approval by Council with a report that identifies budgeted funds being available for such purposes.

 

8.  City Council request CreateTO, in consultation with the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, to explore opportunities for increasing the density of affordable housing on the City-owned lands that comprise the Parkdale Hub site as well as on the Additional Property.

 

9.  City Council authorize the public release of Confidential Attachment 1 following the completion of CreateTO's analysis on the Additional Property and the closing of any associated transaction(s).

 

10.  City Council request the Executive Director, Housing Secretariat, in consultation with CreateTO, and the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management, to include 1303 Queen Street West in the next group of Housing Now properties to be considered by City Council in 2020.

 

11.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services and the Deputy City Manager, Community and Social Services and the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning to follow the guiding principles of the Housing Now Initiative, adopted by City Council at its December 4, 5 and 13 meeting in consideration of CC1.3 "Housing Now", in the implementation of the Parkdale Hub project.

 

12.  City Council request the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, to provide key planning principles and guidelines for the Parkdale Hub project in keeping with the objectives and guiding principles of the Housing Now Initiative.

 

13.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services and the Deputy City Manager, Community and Social Services to convene a working group to develop an Operations and Collaboration Framework as part of Phase 2 of the Parkdale Hub feasibility study, to ensure the successful collocation of municipal and community programs with the Parkdale Hub site. This Working Group should be comprised of senior management from the following City divisions and agencies:

 

- Parks, Forestry and Recreation
- Toronto Public Library
- Social Development, Finance and Administration
- Housing Secretariat
- Economic Development and Culture
- City Manager's Office
- Legal Services
- CreateTO
- Corporate Real Estate Management
 

14.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services and the Deputy City Manager, Community and Social Services, in consultation with CreateTO, to report back to Executive Committee in the fourth quarter of 2020 with an update on Phase 2 of the Parkdale Hub feasibility study, including additional details on capital budget requirements and funding sources.

Summary

This report responds to City Council's request in 2017 for the three Deputy City Managers to convene an interdivisional agency table to determine the feasibility of a coordinated plan for City-owned properties located at 1313, 1303 Queen Street West and 220 Cowan Avenue. An interdivisional team of staff coordinated through the City-wide Real Estate Model has now completed the first phase of a feasibility study, which included due diligence investigations, vision development with stakeholder groups, community engagement and a high-level design study to identify possible approaches to redeveloping these properties, together with the Toronto Parking Authority surface parking lot at 1325 Queen Street West (collectively, the "Parkdale Hub site"), in a coordinated manner. This report provides an overview of the preliminary findings of the feasibility study and makes recommendations for next steps in advancing the Parkdale Hub project as a transformational City-building opportunity that maximizes social benefit and affordable housing.

Financial Impact

This report recommends funding of $0.461 million for Phase 2 of the Parkdale Hub feasibility study to further architectural work, planning analysis, environmental studies and community engagement to advance the Parkdale Hub project towards a rezoning process.

 

Funding of $0.144 million is available in the Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing (XR2116) requiring a related increase to the 2020 Staff Recommended Operating Budget for Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, cost centre FH5417 in coordination with the Executive Director, Housing Secretariat for Council consideration through the 2020 Budget process. The remaining

$0.318 million is available in the 2019-2028 Council Approved Capital Budget and Plan for Facilities, Real Estate, Environment and Energy under the Strategic Projects – Feasibility capital project account (CCA266-01).

 

Subject to the adoption of Recommendation 6, as outlined in Confidential Attachment 1, this report recommends additional funding of $0.247 million for Phase 2 of the Parkdale Hub feasibility study. Additional funding of $0.162 million is available in the Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing (XR2116) requiring a related increase to the 2020 Staff Recommended Operating Budget for SSHA, cost centre FH5417 in coordination with the Executive Director, Housing Secretariat for Council consideration through the 2020 Budget process. The remaining $0.085 million is available in the 2019-2028 Council Approved Capital Budget and Plan for Facilitates, Real Estate, Environment & Energy (FREEE) under the Strategic Projects – Feasibility capital project account (CCA266-01).

 

If approved by Council, the Parkdale Hub project will advance through the stage-gating process for Major Capital Projects, which recognizes the complexity of estimating the budget impacts of such projects over multiple years, and allows for Council approval of the project and the forecast budget at each phase of design. A preliminary costing analysis has estimated the overall cost of delivering this project, including the acquisition and development of the property identified in Confidential Attachment 1, to be between $150.0 million and $175.0 million. Further details regarding capital requirements and associated funding sources will be provided in a report back to Council in the fourth quarter of 2020.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has been provided the financial impacts associated with this report for review as part of the 2020 Budget process.

Background Information
(December 5, 2019) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services and the Deputy City Manager, Community and Social Services on Parkdale Hub Project - Feasibility Study
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140937.pdf)

Attachments 1 to 3
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140939.pdf)

Attachment 4
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140940.pdf)

Confidential Attachment 1
(November 27, 2019) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services on Parkdale Hub Project - Feasibility Study - Notice of Pending Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140684.pdf)

Communications
(December 10, 2019) E-mail from Ric Amis, Parkdale Residents Association (EX.Supp.EX11.6.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/comm/communicationfile-99670.pdf)

(December 11, 2019) Submission from Karla Villanueva Danan, Parkdale Activity Recreation Centre (EX.New.EX11.6.2)

EX11.7

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 10 

Metrolinx's Union Station Enhancement Project - Package 1
Origin
(December 3, 2019) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services
Recommendations

The Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services, recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct the City Manager to report back to the Executive Committee with details of the proposed expropriation of City-owned land for the Union Station Enhancement Project, Package 1, after formal notice of the proposed expropriation is received from Metrolinx.

 

2.  City Council direct the City Manager to continue negotiations with Metrolinx on the revised terms of the Design and Construction Agreement for the implementation of the Union Station Enhancement Project, Package 1 and report back to the Executive Committee on the recommended terms of the Agreement following the conclusion of negotiations.

 

3.  City Council direct the City Manager to waive the City's right to request a Hearing of Necessity for the proposed expropriation of City-owned land for the Union Station Enhancement Project, Package 1.

Summary

This report provides an update on the negotiations with Metrolinx on the necessary agreements for the design and construction of Metrolinx's Union Station Enhancement Project, Package 1, for a new south concourse.

 

Over the past year, the City of Toronto (the "City") and Metrolinx have been actively pursuing negotiations on a framework agreement to ensure Metrolinx is able to access City-owned property that it requires to deliver the Union Station Enhancement Project, Package 1. In the interest of ensuring expedient progress on this project, Metrolinx has recently advised City staff that it intends to expropriate the City-owned land to the south of Union Station, airspace above both York Street and Bay Street at track level, along with certain portions of the Station that are required for the construction of the new south concourse. Metrolinx has committed to continuing negotiations with the City while the expropriation process unfolds in the aim of reaching a friendly agreement to acquire City property it needs to advance work on the Union Station Enhancement Project.

 

To avoid delaying the Union Station Enhancement Project, Package 1, this report requests authorization to waive the City's right to request a Hearing of Necessity for the proposed expropriation of City property. A Hearing of Necessity can be requested to establish whether the expropriation is "fair, sound and reasonably necessary," however the outcome is not binding upon the expropriating authority. Accordingly, this request would only serve to delay the expropriation process and would not impact the outcome.

 

In addition, Metrolinx has indicated that it is committed to continue negotiations on the Design and Construction Agreement with the City to allow Metrolinx to integrate new infrastructure into the City's existing base building services.

Financial Impact

The financial impact of the expropriation will be determined in accordance with the provisions of the Expropriations Act, which requires the expropriating authority to pay compensation to the owner (the City) based on the market value of the land taken, the damages attributable to disturbance, and damages for injurious affection.

 

City staff will report back to the Executive Committee on the revised terms of the Design and Construction Agreement at the conclusion of negotiations and advise on the details of the proposed expropriation of City-owned land, additional authorities required for any additional agreements, or revised terms related to the completion of the Union Station Enhancement Project Package 1.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(December 3, 2019) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services on Update on Metrolinx's Union Station Enhancement Project - Package 1
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140661.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Union Station Enhancement Project Package 1 - Layouts and Renderings
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140842.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Union Station Enhancement Project Package 1 - Metrolinx's City Property Requirements
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140864.pdf)

Attachment 3 - Union Station Map
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140892.pdf)


EX11.8

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

2020 Tax Supported Interim Operating and Capital Budget Estimates
Origin
(November 27, 2019) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
Recommendations

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the 2020 Tax Supported Interim Operating Budget Estimates totalling $5.742 billion as detailed by City Program and Agency in Appendix 1 attached.

Summary

The 2020 Tax Supported Operating and Capital Budgets are scheduled for Council approval in mid- February of 2020. The purpose of this report is to establish the 2020 Tax Supported Interim Operating and Capital Estimates in order to enable Tax Supported City Programs and Agencies to have the necessary spending authority to deliver current services, meet existing contractual commitments and to continue work on previously approved capital projects until the 2020 Operating and Capital Budgets are approved by City Council. 

 

The 2020 Tax Supported Interim Operating Estimates are $5.742 billion gross and require cash outflow funding of $4.808 billion. The 2020 Tax Supported Interim Capital Estimates total $3.391 billion and require debenture financing of $1.491 billion.

Financial Impact

The Interim Budget Estimates provide an interim budget to ensure that adequate spending authority is in place for all Programs and Agencies until such time that Council approves the annual budget.

 

Operating:

 

As shown in Table 1, the 2020 Tax Supported Interim Operating Estimates total $5.742 billion in gross spending authority requiring estimated cash outflows of $4.808 billion.  Cash outflows for City Operations total $2.963 billion, for City Agencies $1.050 billion and $797 million for Corporate Accounts. Agencies are partially funded by the City and are able to cover a portion of expenditures through own source revenues.

 

Table 1 - 2020 Tax Supported Interim Operating Estimates

Service Areas

2020 Interim Budget Gross

2020 Interim Budget Cash Out-Flow

Community and Social Services

    2,008           

            2,008

Infrastructure and Development Services

         590

              590

Finance and Treasury Services

            51

                51

Corporate Services

         209

              209

City Manager

           29

                29

Other City Programs

           71

                71

Accountability Offices

             5

                  5

Total - City Operation

       2,963

             2,963

Agencies

       1,984

             1,050

Corporate Accounts

         795

               795

Total - Tax Supported Programs

       5,742

             4,808

 

Capital:

 

The 2020 Tax Supported Interim Capital Estimates recognise spending authority approved by Council in 2019 and previous years to continue work on previously approved capital projects. Cash flow funding for 2020 commitments and carry forward funding required to complete capital work undelivered in 2019 total $3.390 billion including $1.492 billion in debt funding. 2020 Tax Supported Interim Capital Estimates are summarized in Table 2 below and detailed in Appendix 2.

 

Table 2 - 2020 Interim Tax Supported Capital Estimates

Service Areas

   Gross

   Debt

Community and Social Services

         418

           174

Infrastructure and Development Services

         671

           377

Corporate Services

         485

           164

Finance and Treasury Services

           12

             9

Other City Programs

           47

             3

Total - City Operation

     1,633

          727

Agencies

     1,757

           764

Total Tax Supported Programs

     3,390

       1,491

 

Background Information
(November 27, 2019) Report and Appendix 1 and 2 from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer on 2020 Tax Supported Interim Operating and Capital Budget Estimates
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140681.pdf)


EX11.9

ACTION 

10:00 AM 

 

Ward: 13 

Development Charge and Education Development Charge Complaint - 55-63 Charles Street East
Statutory - Development Charges Act, SO 1997
Origin
(November 27, 2019) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
Recommendations

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer recommends that:  

 

1.  City Council authorize the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer, in consultation with the City Solicitor and the Chief Building Official, to reimburse MOD Developments (Charles) LP, an amount up to $2,463,060.00 of City's Development Charges and $179,300.00 of Toronto District Catholic School Board's Education Development Charges for the 100 rental-replacement units at 55-63 Charles Street East.  Such funds to be withdrawn from the associated development charge reserve accounts.

Summary

This report responds to a complaint filed pursuant to Section 20 of the Development Charge Act, 1997 and Education Development Charges Act relating to a construction project for an apartment building containing 541 condominium apartments and 100 rental-replacement units located at 55-63 Charles Street East.

 

On July 16, 2019 the City Council approved redevelopment of the Subject Lands but place a number of conditions on the issuance of a demolition permit. 

 

The applicant, MOD Developments (Charles) LP, asserts that they should have received a demolition reduction against the City's Development Charges and Toronto District Catholic School Board's Education Development Charges for the existing 100 rental units that will be demolished.  

 

In the case of redevelopment, the development charges payable may be reduced by an amount calculated by multiplying applicable per unit charge by the number of dwelling units that will be demolished or converted to another type of residential or non-residential use. The reduction was not applied because under the bylaw a demolition permit needs to be obtained prior to application for a full building permit.

 

The above grade structural part permit was applied for on September 25, 2019 and issued on October 31, 2019.  Development Charges were assessed for all new units and paid for on October 31, 2019.  Application for demolition permit was made on November 12, 2019.

 

City Staff has reviewed the complaint and is of the opinion that the Development Charges by-law was applied properly and no error was made in the calculation of the charges.

 

Nevertheless, staff believe it is not the intention of the Development Charge by-law or Educational Development Charge by-law to deny demolition reduction when construction proceeds promptly after demolition as in this case. Therefore, staff recommend that Council reimburse applicant for the amount in dispute.

Financial Impact

The value of the disputed demolition reduction is $2,463,060.00, equivalent to the Development Charges paid for the construction of 100 rental units that are to be demolished.

 

Development charges are used to fund the City's eligible growth-related capital costs, as approved by Council through the City's annual capital budgeting process.  Any loss in development charge revenue results in increased tax and rate supported costs, or reduced capacity to invest in capital infrastructure.

Background Information
(November 27, 2019) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer on Development Charge and Education Development Charge Complaint - 55-63 Charles Street East
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140688.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Complaint letter from Goodmans Barristers & Solicitors dated November 4, 2019
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140689.pdf)

Communications
(December 11, 2019) Submission from Andrew Baker, Counsel to the Toronto Catholic District School Board  (EX.New.EX11.9.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/comm/communicationfile-99682.pdf)


EX11.10

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

2018 Office of Emergency Management Update
Origin
(November 25, 2019) Report from the Director, Office of Emergency Management
Recommendations

The Director, Toronto Office of Emergency Management recommends that:

 

1.  City Council receive this report for information.

Summary

This report provides an overview of the Toronto Office of Emergency Management's activities in 2018. This report also advises City Council of the Toronto Office of Emergency Management's non-competitive procurement of services from the Canadian Red Cross to support the response to the evacuation of 650 Parliament Street on August 21, 2018. As per Section 7.4 of the Purchasing By-law, Chapter 195, the Toronto Office of Emergency Management must report to City Council for their information on all non-competitive procurements exceeding $500,000 that are required as a result of an emergency.

Financial Impact

In response to the fire and subsequent evacuation of the residents from 650 Parliament Street, a non-competitive procurement of services were solicited from the Canadian Red Cross for the provision of comprehensive emergency social services in the amount of $3,155,410 under the emergency provision of the Purchasing By-law, Chapter 195. Adoption of this report will result in no further financial implications. The recovery of the costs from the property owner that were incurred by the City resulting from the incident at 650 Parliament Street is being undertaken by the City Manager in coordination with the Deputy City Manager, Infrastructure and Development Services, Accounting Services and Legal Services. The results of the cost recovery will be reported out once the matter is resolved.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(December 25, 2019) Revised Report from the Director, Office of Emergency Management on 2018 Office of Emergency Management Update
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140881.pdf)

(November 25, 2019) Report from the Director, Office of Emergency Management on 2018 Office of Emergency Management Update

EX11.11

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Creation of a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2S+) Council Advisory Body
Origin
(November 27, 2019) Report from the Chief People Officer, People and Equity
Recommendations

The Chief People Officer, People and Equity recommends that:

 

1.  City Council establish a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2S+) Council Advisory Body, in accordance with the Terms of Reference in Attachment 1, for the term ending November 14, 2022 or until their mandate is completed within the 2018 to 2022 term.

Summary

This report responds to 2017 EX28.9 Developing Terms of Reference for a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2S+) Council Advisory Body. It seeks approval of the proposed terms of reference and appointment process outlined in this report.

 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2S+) communities experience higher levels of harassment, discrimination and violence. Research and consultations with the community has also identified that members of the community experience barriers in accessing City services. These trends support the creation of a mechanism for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2S+) Torontonians to inform Council and the City’s decision-making processes. 

 

After engaging Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2S+) stakeholders, City staff are recommending the creation of a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2S+) Council Advisory Body.  This advisory body will advise on identified priority issues to support the elimination of barriers and inequities experienced by Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2S+) communities in accessing City of Toronto programs and services.

Financial Impact

There are no financial implications arising from this report. Any staffing resource required to support the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2S+) Council Advisory Body will be managed from within the City Manager's Office 2020 Operating Budget submissions.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed the financial impact statement and concurs with the financial impact statement.

Background Information
(November 27, 2019) Revised Report from the Chief People Officer on Creation of a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit Council Advisory Body
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140876.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Terms of Reference for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit Council Advisory Body
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140712.pdf)

(November 27, 2019) Report from the Chief People Officer on Creation of a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit Council Advisory Body

EX11.12

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Progress on the Rexdale - Casino Woodbine Community Benefits Agreement - 2019 Update
Origin
(November 27, 2019) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration
Recommendations

The Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration recommends that:  

 

1.  Executive Committee receive this report for information.

Summary

This report provides a status update on the implementation of the Rexdale – Casino Woodbine Community Benefits Agreement. The report indicates that targets are on track to be met.

 

Adopted by City Council in 2018, the Rexdale – Casino Woodbine Community Benefits Agreement establishes a range of conditions on One Toronto Gaming, a partnership between Great Canadian Gaming Corporation and Brookfield Business Partners L.P., which is leading the expansion of gaming at Casino Woodbine. One Toronto Gaming is required to achieve a range of social and economic outcomes, including: i) local and social hiring for both casino operations and construction-related employment, ii) supply chain diversity, iii) maintenance of responsible gambling measures, iv) community access to the event venue, and v) a $5 million contribution to the City of Toronto to create a child care centre that will benefit Casino Woodbine's employees and local residents.

 

The requirements and associated targets in the Rexdale – Casino Woodbine Community Benefits Agreement are on track to being met. Highlights are summarized below.

 

Child Care Centre – One Toronto Gaming has provided the City with the required $5 million contribution for a child care centre. City staff continue to look for a suitable location for a child care centre.
 

- Local and Social Hires – Between February 1, 2018 and August 1, 2019, there were 1,150 new hires as a result of expanded gaming, of which 72 per cent are local and/or social hires (target is 40 per cent). Sixty per cent of total employees are employed full-time.

 
- Supply Chain Diversity – Progress is being made toward achieving an annual target of 10 per cent for social and local procurement.


- Responsible Gambling Measures and Mitigation of Negative Impacts of Expanded Gaming – Requirements are being met.


- Monitoring, Reporting and Governance – The governance framework has been established with three accountability and monitoring committees, which meet quarterly: i) the Community Steering Committee (convened by City of Toronto), ii) the Casino Woodbine Responsible Gambling Oversight Committee (convened by Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation), and iii) the Employment and Labour Market Advisory Working Group (convened by One Toronto Gaming).

A public website is maintained providing quarterly updates.
 

Through the City of Toronto – Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation Municipal Contribution Agreement, the City of Toronto receives a share of gaming revenue. In 2018, the City received $19.2 million, and from January 1 to September 30, 2019, the City received $20.5 million, due to gaming at Casino Woodbine.

 

The Rexdale – Casino Woodbine Community Benefits Agreement is the City's first community benefits agreement. To achieve the targets and ensure its success, the involvement of diverse stakeholders is required. The City acknowledges there is joint accountability for the Agreement and its targets. Many of the processes and mechanisms upon which community benefits agreements rely are still being developed and refined. The experience of the first year of implementation of the Rexdale – Casino Woodbine Community Benefits Agreement indicates that community benefits agreements can offer significant opportunities, however infrastructure, processes and resources are required to maximize those opportunities.

Financial Impact

There is no financial impact resulting from the adoption of the recommendation in this report.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has been provided the financial impacts associated with this initiative for review.

Background Information
(November 27, 2019) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration on Progress on the Rexdale - Casino Woodbine Community Benefits Agreement - 2019 Update
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140670.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Woodbine Local Area Map
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140673.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Rexdale - Casino Woodbine Community Benefits Agreement
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140686.pdf)

Attachment 3 - One Toronto Gaming's Annual Report - Casino Woodbine Community Benefits Agreement - Annual Report - 2019
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140674.pdf)

Attachment 4 - Overview of Efforts to Secure a Location for a Child Care Centre
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140675.pdf)

Attachment 5 - Summary of One Toronto Gaming's Employment and Labour Market Plan for the Woodbine Local Area
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140678.pdf)

Attachment 6 - Overview of City Planning Process Related to Expanded Gaming at Casino Woodbine
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140692.pdf)

Attachment 7 - One Toronto Gaming's Supply Chain Diversity Policy and Procedures
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140693.pdf)

Attachment 8 - Rexdale - Casino Woodbine Community Benefits Agreement Community Steering Committee Terms of Reference
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140695.pdf)

Attachment 9 - Employment and Labour Market Advisory Working Group Terms of Reference
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140697.pdf)

Attachment 10 - Casino Woodbine Responsible Gambling Oversight Committee Terms of Reference and Activity Overview
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140698.pdf)


EX11.13

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Improving Communications for Toronto Hydro Projects
Origin
(November 27, 2019) Report from the General Manager, Transportation Services
Recommendations

The General Manager, Transportation Services recommends that:

 

1.   City Council amend the Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 743, Streets and Sidewalks Use of, Section 743-6 Part D to read as follows:

 

The applicant shall, prior to and during the performance of the work, provide the following methods of notification and information to the public in such manner as directed by the General Manager in the permit:

 

(1) The applicant shall issue a printed public notice to the occupants of property impacted by the work which shall provide information on the type of work to be undertaken, details on the type of road repairs, the expected duration of the work, the expected timing for permanent repair of the street, and an orthophoto clearly identifying the subject property, location of work and property line.

 

2.  City Council direct the General Manager, Transportation Services to revise the Municipal Consent Requirements for the Installation of Plant Within City of Toronto Streets to address large scale pole replacement projects and to amend Chapter 5 - Above Ground Plant: Notifications to read as follows:

 

The Applicant shall provide written notification and/or concurrence to all adjacent properties, and all properties that will face or will have a line of sight to the proposed plant.  Such notification shall outline the nature of the work, describe the size and appearance of the proposed plant, and include an orthophoto clearly identifying the subject property, location of the proposed plant and property line.  The notice shall include the phone number of the contact person at the Applicant's office.

Summary

In March of 2019, the City Ombudsman reported to City Council with the results from an enquiry related to Toronto Hydro's "Project Carlaw" pole replacement project in former Ward 30.  This enquiry stemmed from six complaints from Toronto residents.  Among other concerns, all six residents complained that Toronto Hydro was installing new hydro poles in front of their homes without notice and some reported poor customer service, including delayed, incomplete or rude responses to their questions or complaints.  The Ombudsman's report made several recommendations to improve the fairness of Toronto Hydro's service to residents.

 

City Council adopted the Ombudsman's report and in doing so requested a report back to Executive Committee to determine whether Toronto Hydro's new constituent communications plan meets the current City of Toronto standard for neighbourhood communications and requested a review of the Enquiry Report (February 13, 2019) on Project Carlaw from the Ombudsman and the Municipal Consent Requirements to determine how overall compliance with current policies can be strengthened.

 

This report responds to City Council's request by commenting on Toronto Hydro's constituent communications plan, it identifies enhancements to the City of Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 743, Use of Streets and Sidewalks, Municipal Consent Requirements for the Installation of Plant Within City of Toronto Streets, and existing procedures to strengthen current policies and enforce compliance of Toronto Hydro pole replacements.

Financial Impact

There are no financial implications for the City resulting from adoption this report.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(November 27, 2019) Report from the General Manager, Transportation Services on Improving Communications for Toronto Hydro Projects
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140708.pdf)


EX11.14

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 24 

Request to Establish a Community Police Office at 200 Poplar Road
Origin
(November 27, 2019) Member Motion from Councillor Paul Ainslie, seconded by Councillor Shelley Carroll
Recommendations

Councillor Paul Ainslie, seconded by Councillor Shelley Carroll, recommends that:

 

1.  City Council request the Toronto Police Services Board, as part of the newly announced neighbourhood officers' program, to establish a Community Police Office at 200 Poplar Road, in the Community of Scarborough-Guildwood.

Summary

City Council on November 26 and 27, 2019, referred Motion MM12.4 to the Executive Committee.

 

The purpose of this Motion is to request City of Toronto Council's support in requesting the Toronto Police Services Board, through the newly announced neighbourhood officers' program, to establish a Community Police Office in Scarborough-Guildwood at 200 Poplar Road, the former site of Sir Robert Borden Collegiate Institute, as this new neighbourhood officers' program has been created to better serve and enhance community policing.

 

Establishing a Police Office at 200 Poplar Road located on a residential street would serve the Scarborough-Guildwood Community well.

 

Given that the City of Toronto is finalizing the purchase of the former school located at this site, it is an opportunity to enhance the police work in the community.

Background Information
(November 27, 2019) Member Motion from Councillor Paul Ainslie, seconded by Councillor Shelley Carroll on Request to establish a Community Police Office at 200 Poplar Road
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140726.pdf)


EX11.15

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

City of Toronto Investment Report for the Year 2018 and the Six Month Period Ending June 30, 2019
Origin
(November 27, 2019) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
Recommendations

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer recommends that:  

 

1.  City Council receive this report for information.

Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide the following information:

 

1.  Performance of the Funds for 2018, and the first half of 2019

2.  General Market Update and Benchmark Performance

 

The City's General Group of Funds (General Fund) that holds the City's working capital and the amounts designated for the City's reserves and reserve funds earned:

 

- $156.5 million in 2018 (2.7 percent rate of return);
- $39.4 million in the first quarter of 2019 (3.0 percent annualized rate of return);
- $122.5 million in the second quarter of 2019 (8.5 percent annualized rate of return);
- $161.9 million earned year-to-date as at June 30, 2019 (5.8 percent annualized rate of return).
 

The City's Sinking Fund portfolio that holds funds for future debt repayments earned:

 

- $54.1 million in 2018 (3.2 percent rate of return);
- $12.3 million in the first quarter of 2019 (3.1 percent annualized rate of return);
- $39.9 million in the second quarter of 2019 (9.4 percent annualized rate of return);
- $52.2 million earned year-to-date as at June 30, 2019 (6.3 percent annualized rate of return).
 

Since January 1, 2018, the City's long-term investments have been managed by the Toronto Investment Board under a new Council adopted Investment Policy which is based on the prudent investor standard. As of May 1, 2019, seventy percent of the Sinking Fund and the Long Term Fund have been managed by four external fixed income managers selected by the Toronto Investment Board. As at June 30, 2019, agreements with the global equity fund managers were being negotiated, and the process of selecting real asset fund managers was on-going.

Financial Impact

The City’s General Group of Funds ("General Fund") earned $156.5 million in 2018, $39.4 million in the first quarter of 2019, and $122.5 million in the second quarter of 2019.

 

The 2018 earnings from the General Fund were allocated to the operating budget ($109.4 million) and reserve funds ($47.1 million) according to the Council approved interest allocation policy. The investment activities in 2018 and the first half of 2019 were in compliance with the investment policies and goals adopted by City Council. The earnings for the first half of 2019 have met the forecasted income contribution to the 2019 Operating Budget.

 

The City's Sinking Funds portfolio earned $54.1 million in 2018, $52.2 million in the first half of 2019. These earnings are retained within the Sinking Funds and must be used for the purpose of retiring debenture debt at maturity.

Background Information
(November 27, 2019) Report and Attachments 1 - 3 from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer on City of Toronto Investment Report for the Year 2018 and the Six Month Period Ending June 30, 2019
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140704.pdf)


EX11.16

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Capital Variance Report for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019
Origin
(November 29, 2019) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
Recommendations

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve in-year budget adjustments to the 2019-2028 Approved Capital Budget and Plan as detailed in Appendix 4 that result in no incremental impact on debt financing.

Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide City Council with the City of Toronto capital spending for the nine month period ended September 30, 2019, as well as projected expenditures to December 31, 2019. Furthermore, this report seeks Council's approval for in-year budget adjustments to the 2019 Approved Capital Budget that have no impact on 2019 approved debt.

 

As illustrated in Table 1 below, City's 2019 capital expenditure was $2.237 billion or 39.3 percent of the 2019 capital budget of $5.689 billion for the period ended September 30, 2019 and is projecting to expend $3.945 billion or 69.3 percent by December 31, 2019.

 

Table 1 - Capital Variance Summary

 

2019 Approved Budget*

Actual Expenditures -

January to September

Projected Expenditures - January to December

 

$M

$M

Percent

$M

Percent

City Operations

1,968

679

34.5 percent

1,269

64.5 percent

Agencies

2,592

1,002

38.7 percent

1,699

65.6 percent

Subtotal - Tax Supported

4,560

1,682

36.9 percent

2,968

65.1

percent

Rate Supported

1,129

555

49.2 percent

977

86.5 percent

TOTAL

5,689

2,237

39.3 percent

3,945

69.3 percent

*Note: Includes 2018 carry forward funding and 2019 in-year adjustments

 

The Capital spending pattern for the first nine month typically ranges between 32 percent and 37 percent of the total Council Approved Capital Budget. Total City projected spend of 69.3 percent by year-end is comprised of a Tax Supported Programs spending rate of 65.1 percent and a Rate Supported Programs spending rate of 86.5 percent. The projected year-end spending rates presented in this report are based on the submissions from each Program and Agency, and as such, the preparation of this report has been based on this information.

 

The report also details the 6 completed capital projects that have a combined budget of $8.3 million that are ready to be closed. They have been completed under budget, realizing underspending of $1.6 million.

Financial Impact

The capital expenditures in the first nine months of 2019 total $2.237 billion and year-end expenditures are anticipated to increase to $3.945 billion or 69.3 percent of the total 2019 Approved Capital budget. 14 of the 36 City Programs and Agencies have projected year-end spending rate in excess of 70 percent.

 

Appendix 1 summarizes the spending in the first nine months and year-end projected spending rate by City Program and Agency.

 

Projects to be closed

 

The City's Financial Control By-Law stipulates that the Chief Financial Officer must "submit a report to Council on an annual basis detailing all capital projects closed during the year". The City reports quarterly on the disposition of closed projects.

 

A capital project is considered fully closed when all its subsidiary projects/subprojects are completed. 6 capital projects were reported to be completed at the end of Third Quarter 2019 that have a combined budget of $8.3 million. They have been completed under budget realizing a permanent underspending of $1.6 million. The permanent underspending has associated funding of $0.4 million in capital from current, $0.3 million in debt, $0.2 million in Development Charges and $0.7 million in reserves/reserve funds.

Background Information
(November 29, 2019) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer on Capital Variance Report for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140671.pdf)

Appendix 1 - 2019 Capital Variance and Projection Summary for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140894.pdf)

Appendix 2 - Capital Projects for Closure
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140895.pdf)

Appendix 3 - Major Capital Projects
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140896.pdf)

Revised Appendix 4 - In-Year Adjustments for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140897.pdf)

Appendix 5 - Capital Variance Dashboard by Program and Agency
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140898.pdf)


16a Capital Variance Report for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019
Origin
(December 6, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee
Recommendations

The Budget Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve in-year budget adjustments to the 2019-2028 Approved Capital Budget and Plan as detailed in Appendix 4 to the report (November 29, 2019) from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer that result in no incremental impact on debt financing.

Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide City Council with the City of Toronto capital spending for the nine month period ended September 30, 2019, as well as projected expenditures to December 31, 2019. Furthermore, this report seeks Council's approval for in-year budget adjustments to the 2019 Approved Capital Budget that have no impact on 2019 approved debt.

 

As illustrated in Table 1 below, City's 2019 capital expenditure was $2.237 billion or 39.3 percent of the 2019 capital budget of $5.689 billion for the period ended September 30, 2019 and is projecting to expend $3.945 billion or 69.3 percent by December 31, 2019.

 

Table 1 - Capital Variance Summary

 

 

2019 Approved Budget*

Actual Expenditures -

January to September

Projected Expenditures - January to December

 

$M

$M

Percent

$M

Percent

City Operations

1,968

679

34.5 percent

1,269

64.5 percent

Agencies

2,592

1,002

38.7 percent

1,699

65.6 percent

Subtotal - Tax Supported

4,560

1,682

36.9 percent

2,968

65.1 percent

Rate Supported

1,129

555

49.2 percent

977

86.5 percent

TOTAL

5,689

2,237

39.3 percent

3,945

69.3 percent

 

*Note: Includes 2018 carry forward funding and 2019 in-year adjustments

 

The Capital spending pattern for the first nine month typically ranges between 32 percent and 37 percent of the total Council Approved Capital Budget. Total City projected spend of 69.3 percent by year-end is comprised of a Tax Supported Programs spending rate of 65.1 percent and a Rate Supported Programs spending rate of 86.5 percent. The projected year-end spending rates presented in this report are based on the submissions from each Program and Agency, and as such, the preparation of this report has been based on this information.

 

The report also details the 6 completed capital projects that have a combined budget of $8.3 million that are ready to be closed. They have been completed under budget, realizing underspending of $1.6 million.

Background Information
(December 6, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee on Capital Variance Report for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140948.pdf)


EX11.17

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Operating Variance Report for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019
Origin
(November 20, 2019) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
Recommendations

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the budget adjustments and any associated complement changes detailed in Appendix D to amend the 2019 Approved Operating Budget, such adjustments to have no impact on the 2019 Approved Net Operating Budget of the City.

Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide City Council with the Operating Variance for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 as well as projections to year-end. This report also requests City Council's approval for amendments to the 2019 Approved Operating Budget that have no impact on the City's 2019 Approved Net Operating Budget.

 

The following table summarizes the financial position of the City's Tax Supported Operations as of September 30, 2019 and the projection at year-end:

 

Table 1 - Tax Supported Operating Variance Summary

  

Variance ($M)

Favourable / (Unfavourable)

2019 Q3 YTD

2019 Year-End Projection

 

Budget

Actual

Var

Budget

Actual

Var

City Operations

1,659.6

1,605.9

53.8

2,289.0

2,243.2

45.8

Agencies

1,555.0

1,545.3

9.7

2,142.1

2,138.2

3.8

Corporate Accounts

(4.8)

(193.1)

188.2

(75.2)

(240.1)

165.0

Total Variance

3,209.8

2,958.1

251.7

4,355.9

4,141.3

214.6

Less: Toronto Building*

(9.0)

(29.8)

20.8

(16.9)

(49.7)

32.9

Adjusted Variance

3,218.8

2,987.9

230.9

4,372.8

4,191.0

181.7

Percent of Gross Budget

 

 

2.4 percent

 

 

1.3 percent

* In accordance with the Building Code Act, any surplus from Toronto Building must be contributed to the Building Code Act Service Improvement Reserve Fund.

 

Year-to-Date and Year-End Spending Results:

 

As noted in Table 1 above, for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 Tax Supported Operations experienced a favourable net variance of $251.7 million or 7.8 percent of planned expenditures. The key factors contributing to the favourable year-to-date variance are:

 

- Year-to-date net under expenditure in City Operations is primarily due to lower than planned salary and benefits while sustaining current service levels, as well as higher than planned revenue in Fire Services, Municipal Licensing & Standards, and Toronto Building. Favourable year-to-date variance was partially offset by over spending in Shelter, Support and Housing Administration.
 

- Favourable net expenditures in agencies driven by under expenditures in TO Live and Toronto Transit Commission, as well as higher cost recoveries and miscellaneous revenue for the Toronto Police Service.
 

- Favourable revenue from Interest/Investment Earnings and Municipal Land Transfer Tax, as well as lower than planned Debt Charges.

 
For year-end, the City is projecting a net favourable variance of $181.7 million or 1.9 percent of the 2019 Gross Operating Budget of $13,471 million, adjusted for Toronto Building. The favourable variance is partially offset by Shelter, Support and Housing Administration due to continued high demand for Hostel Services.

 

Excluding the one-time capital gain realized during the transition of investment portfolios in the Corporate Accounts (Interest/Investment Earnings) as well under expenditures for internal loans, the City is projecting a net favourable adjusted variance of $71.6 million or 0.5 percent of the 2019 Gross Operating Budget. An overview of the key variance drivers can be found in the "Comments" section of this report as well as in a detailed summary provided in Appendix E.

 

Rate Supported Programs:

 

Rate Supported Programs reported a favourable year-to-date variance of $64.9 million. The favourable variance is attributed to gross under expenditures in salary and benefits while maintaining service levels, earlier than planned receipt of revenue as well as higher consumption volumes, and one-time capital gain from the sale of property. At year-end, a favourable projected variance is anticipated to be $96.3 million that is primarily driven by gross under spending in Toronto Water and higher revenues from Solid Waste Management.

 

Rate Supported Programs are funded entirely by the user fees that are used to pay for the services provided and the infrastructure to deliver them. Solid Waste Management Services and Toronto Water's respective year-end surpluses, if any, must be transferred to the Wastewater and Water Stabilization Reserves and Waste Management Reserve Fund, respectively, to finance capital investments and ongoing capital repairs and maintenance.

 

Table 2 - Year-To-Date Rate Supported Operating Variance Summary

  

Variance ($M)

Favourable / (Unfavourable)

2019 Q3 YTD

2019 Year-End Projection

 

Budget

Actual

Var

Budget

Actual

Var

Solid Waste Management Services

(5.6)

(23.0)

17.4

0.0

(51.6)

51.6

Toronto Parking Authority

(49.6)

(58.5)

8.9

(66.5)

(73.3)

6.8

Toronto Water

(1.1)

(39.7)

38.6

0.0

(37.9)

37.9

Total Variance

(56.4)

(121.3)

64.9

(66.5)

(162.8)

96.3

 

Financial Impact

As of September 30, 2019 the City experienced a favourable variance of net revenues and expenses of $251.7 million. The City is projecting for December 31, 2019 a favourable variance of net revenues and expenditures of $214.6 million before reserve contributions.

 

Appendices A, B and C provide detailed summary of gross expenditures, revenue and net expenditures for the nine month results and projections to year-end by Program and Agency, respectively. Appendix D details the recommended in-year budget adjustments that are fiscally neutral to the 2019 Approved Operating Budget.

Background Information
(November 20, 2019) Report and Appendices A to E from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer on Operating Variance Report for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140672.pdf)


17a Operating Variance Report for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019
Origin
(December 6, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide City Council with the Operating Variance for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 as well as projections to year-end. This report also requests City Council's approval for amendments to the 2019 Approved Operating Budget that have no impact on the City's 2019 Approved Net Operating Budget.

 

The following table summarizes the financial position of the City's Tax Supported Operations as of September 30, 2019 and the projection at year-end:

 

Table 1 - Tax Supported Operating Variance Summary

 

Variance ($M)

Favourable /

(Unfavourable)

2019 Q3 YTD

2019 Year-End Projection

 

Budget

Actual

Var

Budget

Actual

Var

City Operations

1,659.6

1,605.9

53.8

2,289.0

2,243.2

45.8

Agencies

1,555.0

1,545.3

9.7

2,142.1

2,138.2

3.8

Corporate Accounts

(4.8)

(193.1)

188.2

(75.2)

(240.1)

165.0

Total Variance

3,209.8

2,958.1

251.7

4,355.9

4,141.3

214.6

Less: Toronto Building*

(9.0)

(29.8)

20.8

(16.9)

(49.7)

32.9

Adjusted Variance

3,218.8

2,987.9

230.9

4,372.8

4,191.0

181.7

% of Gross Budget

 

 

2.4 percent

 

 

1.3 percent

Background Information
(December 6, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee on Operating Variance Report for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2019
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140922.pdf)


EX11.18

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Reserves, Council Directed and Obligatory Reserve Fund (Deferred Revenue) Balances Report - September 30, 2019
Origin
(November 22, 2019) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
Recommendations

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer recommends that: 

 

1.  Executive Committee receive this report for information.

Summary

This report provides information on reserve and reserve fund balances as at September 30, 2019.  The transfers made into and out of reserve and reserve funds are based on amounts approved by Council during the 2019 or prior year budget processes, or on an ad hoc basis throughout the fiscal year. The tables and appendices reflect information by major reserve and reserve fund category.

 

The reported balances include Council approved loans, granted under various City programs, which must be repaid to the reserves or reserve funds.

 

It is important to note that 82 percent ($5.6 billion) of the $6.8 billion of Reserve and Reserve Funds, as at September 30, 2019, represent obligatory and Council directed reserve funds. $851.9 million, of the remaining $1.2 billion, is committed to offset capital costs and pressures on rate-based activities. The remaining reserve and reserve fund balances of $322.6 million are available for various unanticipated costs and to stabilize various funding sources including the tax base. The adequacy review of the major reserve and reserve fund balances conducted by an external consultant is expected to be delivered in Fourth Quarter of 2019.

Financial Impact

There are no financial implications contained in this report.

Background Information
(November 20, 2019) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer on Reserves, Council Directed and Obligatory Reserve Fund (Deferred Revenue) Balances Report - September 30, 2019
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140645.pdf)

Appendices A1, B1, C1, A2, B2 and C2
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140644.pdf)


18a Reserves, Council Directed and Obligatory Reserve Fund (Deferred Revenue) Balances Report - September 30, 2019
Origin
(December 6, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee
Recommendations

The Budget Committee recommends that: 

 

1.  Executive Committee receive the report (November 22, 2019) from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer for information.

Summary

This report provides information on reserve and reserve fund balances as at September 30, 2019.  The transfers made into and out of reserve and reserve funds are based on amounts approved by Council during the 2019 or prior year budget processes, or on an ad hoc basis throughout the fiscal year. The tables and appendices reflect information by major reserve and reserve fund category.

 

The reported balances include Council approved loans, granted under various City programs, which must be repaid to the reserves or reserve funds.

 

It is important to note that 82 percent ($5.6 billion) of the $6.8 billion of Reserve and Reserve Funds, as at September 30, 2019, represent obligatory and Council directed reserve funds. $851.9 million, of the remaining $1.2 billion, is committed to offset capital costs and pressures on rate-based activities. The remaining reserve and reserve fund balances of $322.6 million are available for various unanticipated costs and to stabilize various funding sources including the tax base. The adequacy review of the major reserve and reserve fund balances conducted by an external consultant is expected to be delivered in Fourth Quarter of 2019.

Background Information
(December 6, 2019) Letter from the Chair of the Budget Committee on Reserves, Council Directed and Obligatory Reserve Fund (Deferred Revenue) Balances Report - September 30, 2019
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140947.pdf)


EX11.19

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Information and Technology 2019-2028 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations/Deferrals
Origin
(November 21, 2019) Report from the Chief Technology Officer, Information and Technology
Recommendations

The Chief Technology Officer recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the deferral and acceleration of funds in Information and Technology's 2019 Council Approved Capital Budget and 2020-2028 Capital Plan in the amount of $3.463M as detailed in Schedule Attachment 1, "Appendix 1 – IT Capital Budget Accelerations/Deferrals" to the report from the Chief Technology Officer, with a zero gross and net debt impact.

Summary

The purpose of this report is to amend Information and Technology's 2019 Council Approved Capital Budget and 2020-2028 Capital Plan. The amendments will have a zero gross and net debt impact. It will better align 2019 and future cash flows with Information and Technology's capital project delivery schedule and program requirements supporting modernization and outcomes to improve the City's service delivery.  These changes do not affect individual project deliverables, schedules and/or scope.

Financial Impact

The approval of this report will authorize the deferral and acceleration of funds in Information and Technology's Approved 2019 Capital Budget and 2020-2028 Capital Plan in the amount $3.463 million, as detailed in Attachment 1, "Appendix 1 – IT Capital Budget Accelerations/Deferrals 2019". These amendments will have a zero gross and net debt impact.

 

There are no additional costs to the City as a result of the approval of this report.  The recommended adjustments will align the Approved 2019 Capital Budget with Information and Technology's capital program requirements for 2019 and beyond.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(November 21, 2019) Report from the Chief Technology Officer, Information and Technology on Information and Technology 2019-2028 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations/Deferrals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140494.pdf)

Appendix A - Accelerations and Deferrals between 2019, 2020 and 2021
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140495.pdf)


19a Information and Technology 2019-2028 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations/Deferrals
Origin
(December 6, 2019) Letter from the Budget Committee
Recommendations

The Budget Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the deferral and acceleration of funds in Information and Technology's 2019 Council Approved Capital Budget and 2020-2028 Capital Plan in the amount of $3.463 million as detailed in Schedule Attachment 1, "Appendix 1 – IT Capital Budget Accelerations/Deferrals" to the report (November 21, 2019) from the Chief Technology Officer, Information and Technology with a zero gross and net debt impact.

Summary

The purpose of this report is to amend Information and Technology's 2019 Council Approved Capital Budget and 2020-2028 Capital Plan. The amendments will have a zero gross and net debt impact. It will better align 2019 and future cash flows with Information and Technology's capital project delivery schedule and program requirements supporting modernization and outcomes to improve the City's service delivery.  These changes do not affect individual project deliverables, schedules and/or scope.

Background Information
(December 6, 2019) Letter from the Chair of the Budget Committee on Information and Technology 2019-2028 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations/Deferrals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140949.pdf)


EX11.20

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Aboriginal Affairs Advisory Committee - Frequency of Meetings and Quorum
Origin
(November 27, 2019) Letter from the Aboriginal Affairs Advisory Committee
Recommendations

The Aboriginal Affairs Advisory Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council amend the Aboriginal Affairs Advisory Committee Terms of Reference as follows:

 

a.  amend Section C.4. so that it now reads as follows:

 

"4.  The Advisory Committee will hold up to four six meetings per year at the call of the Chair or Co-Chairs."

 

b.  add a provision that sets the quorum necessary for a Committee meeting at 30 percent of members.

Summary

At its meeting on November 22, 2019, the Aboriginal Affairs Advisory Committee considered Item AA2.6 and recommended to Executive Committee that City Council amend the Aboriginal Affairs Advisory Committee Terms of Reference.

 

From letter (November 6, 2019) from Angus D. Palmer, Member, Aboriginal Affairs Advisory Committee:

 

I do not believe that four meetings per year is a sufficient number to permit the Committee to provide timely input to the range of issues which the Committee can reasonably be expected to deal with. At the same time, I am concerned that a requirement to have a minimum of 50 percent of the Committee in attendance at all times in order for business to be conducted runs the risk of having already infrequent meetings even less frequent in the event that, for some reason, quorum cannot be obtained.

Background Information
(November 27, 2019) Letter from the Aboriginal Affairs Advisory Committee on Frequency of Meetings and Quorum
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140668.pdf)

(November 6, 2019) Letter from Angus D. Palmer, Member, Aboriginal Affairs Advisory Committee on Frequency of Meetings and Quorum
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140669.pdf)


EX11.21

ACTION 

 

 

 

City of Toronto Multi-Year Accessibility Plan 2020-2025
Origin
(November 1, 2019) Letter from the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee
Recommendations

The Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee recommends that:

                                                   

1.  City Council adopt the City of Toronto Multi-Year Accessibility Plan 2020-2025 found in Appendix A to the report (October 21, 2019) from the Chief People Officer, People and Equity.

Summary

At its meeting of November 1, 2019, the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee considered Item DI6.4 and recommended to Executive Committee that City Council adopt the City of Toronto Multi-Year Accessibility Plan 2020-2025 found in Appendix A to the report (October 21, 2019) from the Chief People Officer, People and Equity. 

 

This report responds to the requirement under both the City' of Toronto's Corporate Accessibility Policy (adopted by Council on June 28, 2018) and the legislative requirements under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 for a City of Toronto Multi-Year Accessibility Plan.

 

The 2020-2025 Multi-Year Accessibility Plan outlines outcomes and initiatives that reaffirm the City's commitment to an accessible City and building an equitable and inclusive society that values the contributions of people with disabilities. The Multi-Year Accessibility Plan provides a roadmap for the identification, removal and prevention of accessibility barriers, will improve awareness and understanding of requirements, and help embed accessibility into all City operations.

 

The City's Multi-Year Accessibility Plan is a key component of the City's accessibility framework which outlines how the City will provide an accessible environment in which people with disabilities can access the City's goods, services and facilities, including all buildings, public spaces, information and communications, and employment opportunities in a way that meets their individual needs. The City is equally committed to supporting City employees through advice, policies, tools, resources and governance structures that promote an inclusive workplace and support employees in providing accessible goods, services and facilities.

Background Information
(November 1, 2019) Letter from the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee on City of Toronto Multi-Year Accessibility Plan 2020-2025
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140421.pdf)

(October 21, 2019) Report from the Chief People Officer, People and Equity on City of Toronto Multi-Year Accessibility Plan 2020-2025
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140422.pdf)

Revised Appendix A - City of Toronto Multi-Year Accessibility Plan 2020-2025
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140423.pdf)


EX11.22

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Employment Accessibility at the City of Toronto
Origin
(November 1, 2019) Letter from the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee
Recommendations

The Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee recommends that:

 

1.  The Executive Committee request the Director, Strategic Recruitment to provide an update to the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee in the second quarter of 2020 that includes information on the specific recruitment tactics that will be used with the different disability communities.

Summary

At its meeting of November 1, 2019, the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee considered Item DI6.2 and recommended that the Executive Committee request the Director, Strategic Recruitment to provide an update to the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee in the second quarter of 2020 that includes information on the specific recruitment tactics that will be used with the different disability communities. 

 

Barbara Shulman, Director of Strategic Recruitment, and Hali Farah, Senior HR Consultant, People and Equity gave a presentation to the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee on the City's strategy for increasing recruitment of people with disabilities.

Background Information
(November 1, 2019) Letter from the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee on Employment Accessibility at the City of Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140419.pdf)

Presentation from the Director of Strategic Recruitment and the Senior HR Consultant, People and Equity on Employment Accessibility at the City of Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140420.pdf)


EX11.23

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Toronto Transit Commission Wheel-Trans Update on Appeal Process and Service Enhancements
Origin
(November 1, 2019) Letter from the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee
Recommendations

The Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council request the Toronto Transit Commission Board to request Wheel-Trans staff to meet with parents, grandparents and caregivers of infants and children as soon as possible to streamline the process of bringing strollers onto Wheel-Trans vehicles to ensure accessible and consistent services across the system, and to provide an update to the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee in the first quarter of 2020.

Summary

At its meeting of November 1, 2019, the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee considered Item DI6.5 and among other things, recommended to the Executive Committee that City Council request the Toronto Transit Commission Board to request Wheel-Trans staff to meet with parents, grandparents and caregivers of infants and children as soon as possible to streamline the process of bringing strollers onto Wheel-Trans vehicles to ensure accessible and consistent services across the system, and to provide an update to the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee in the first quarter of 2020.

 

Dwayne Geddes, Head of Toronto Transit Commission Wheel-Trans; Cameron Penman, Manager, Customer Service; Dean Milton, Manager, Strategic Initiatives; and Lodon Hassan, Assistant Manager, Customer Service will provide an overview on the Toronto Transit Commission Wheel-Trans appeal process and service enhancements.  The presentation will include information on the appeal process, re-registration, family of services and door to door service.

Background Information
(November 1, 2019) Letter from the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee on TTC Wheel-Trans Update on Appeal Process and Service Enhancements
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140424.pdf)

Presentation from the Head of Wheel-Trans on TTC Wheel-Trans Update on Service Enhancements
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140425.pdf)

Letter from the Toronto Transit Commission Board on City Council Transmittal - Wheel-Trans Appeal Process
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140426.pdf)


EX11.24

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Relocation of the Etobicoke Civic Centre
Origin
(November 25, 2019) Letter from the Board of Directors of CreateTO
Recommendations

The Board of Directors of CreateTO recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize CreateTO to proceed with Phase Three of the Major Capital Project Approval Process, including Detail Design, Contract Documents and Tender, in consultation with the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services.

 

2.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services, the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer, and CreateTO to review opportunities to address the projected capital funding gap through future year budget processes, including the following options:

 

a.  exchange the use of unplanned office space in the new Etobicoke Civic Centre to the Toronto District School Board in return for the Toronto District School Board lands adjacent to the existing Etobicoke Civic Centre;

 

b.  identify third-party tenants to occupy unplanned office space in new Etobicoke Civic Centre and the potential to use such revenue sources to secure recoverable debt;

 

c.  identify other sources of capital including grants and financing programs available from the Provincial and Federal Governments; and

 

d.  maximize density opportunities within the appropriate City Planning context on City-owned property at Bloor/Islington, Westwood Theatre Lands, and current Etobicoke Civic Centre.

 

3. City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services, in collaboration with CreateTO, to apply ModernTO standards in planning office space requirements at the new Etobicoke Civic Centre.

 

4. City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services and CreateTO to consult with relevant stakeholders regarding the Etobicoke Civic Centre relocation initiative, including members of the Etobicoke-York Community Council and impacted City Divisions, Agencies and Corporations.

 

5. City Council direct CreateTO, in consultation with the Deputy City Manager, Corporate Services, to report back to the CreateTO Board and City Council in the fourth quarter of 2021 on the results of the Phase Three work, including tendered cost estimates, proposed funding model, and final business case including complete financials for the overall project with the recommended contract award.

Summary

At its meeting on November 25, 2019, the Board of Directors of CreateTO considered Item RA9.4 - Relocation of the Etobicoke Civic Centre - Update and Next Steps and made recommendations to City Council.

 

The purpose of the report (November 15, 2019) from the Chief Executive Officer, CreateTO is to inform the Board of Directors of CreateTO (the "Board") and City Council regarding the results of the work completed for Phase Two of the Major Capital Project Approval Process and to request City Council approval to proceed with Phase Three at a cost of $26.13 million, including Detail Design, Contract Documents and Tender. Upon receipt of a positive recommendation by the Board, this report will be transmitted to City Council for approval.

 

This report seeks to reinforce the Board and City Council's commitment to relocate the existing, outdated Etobicoke Civic Centre to the Westwood Theatre Lands as an integral City Building initiative. The establishment of this new civic centre will provide much needed services for a growing West District and act as a catalyst for revitalization of the Etobicoke City Centre. Additional social, economic, and financial benefits include:

 

- New civic and community infrastructure, including a recreation centre, library, childcare, and public square;

 

- Replacement of the existing old, functionally obsolete and costly Etobicoke Civic Centre facility;

 

- Positioning of municipal services at a transit hub, improving access for residents, staff and visitors;

 

- Improved public realm through internationally renowned, state of the art design;

 

- Support for TransformTO by building a Net-Zero community and incorporation of district energy systems;

 

- Support for ModernTO with efficient municipal office spaces and redistribution of jobs to Etobicoke;

 

- Prudent financial plan with significant funding contributed from unlocking underutilized City-owned land in the West District.

 

In November 2017, City Council accepted the selection of the winning design for the new Etobicoke Civic Centre and directed staff to proceed with Phase Two of the Major Capital Project Approval Process ("Phase Two"). Completed Phase Two activities include stakeholder consultations, detailed building program, site investigation, schematic design, class C cost estimates and updated project budget schedule. Details respecting these activities are provided in this report.

 

If approved by Council, CreateTO, in consultation with City staff, will proceed to Phase Three of the Major Capital Project Approval Process ("Phase Three"), which includes Detail Design, Contract Documents and Tender. Staff will report back to the Board and City Council in the fourth quarter of 2021 with the results of the Phase Three work, including tendered cost estimates, proposed funding model, and final business case for the overall project with the recommended contract award.

Background Information
(November 25, 2019) Letter from the Board of Directors of CreateTO on Relocation of the Etobicoke Civic Centre - Update and Next Steps
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140635.pdf)

(November 15, 2019) Report from the Chief Executive Officer, CreateTO on the Relocation of the Etobicoke Civic Centre - Update and Next Steps
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140636.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Schematic Design/Built Form Rendering
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140637.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Westwood Theatre Lands Block Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140638.pdf)


EX11.25

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

St. Lawrence Centre Redevelopment
Confidential Attachment - A plan to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the Board of Directors of TO Live
Origin
(November 19, 2019) Letter from the Board of Directors of TO Live
Recommendations

The Board of Directors of TO Live recommends that:

 

1.  City Council support the redevelopment concept for the St. Lawrence Centre, described as Option 2 in Confidential Attachment 1 to the report (November 7, 2019) from the President and Chief Executive Officer, TO Live.

Summary

At its meeting of November 19, 2019, the Board of Directors of TO Live considered Item CT7.6 and among other things, recommended that City Council support the redevelopment concept for the St. Lawrence Centre, described as Option 2 in Confidential Attachment 1 to the report (November 7, 2019) from the President and Chief Executive Officer, TO Live.

 

The purpose of the report (November 7, 2019) from the President and Chief Executive Officer, TO Live is to provide the Board of Directors of TO Live with an update on the options considered for the redevelopment of the St Lawrence Centre for the Arts and recommend a full redevelopment and seek instructions on the process and next steps.

Background Information
(November 19, 2019) Letter from the Board of Directors of TO Live on St. Lawrence Centre Redevelopment - Options Review
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140416.pdf)

(November 7, 2019) Report from the President and Chief Executive Officer, TO Live on St. Lawrence Centre Redevelopment - Options Review
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140417.pdf)

Confidential Attachment 1 - St. Lawrence Centre Redevelopment Options Review
Communications
(December 9, 2019) Letter from Clyde Wagner, TO Live (EX.Supp.EX11.25.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/comm/communicationfile-99667.pdf)


EX11.26

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

City Building Fund
Origin
(December 11, 2019) Letter from Mayor John Tory
Recommendations

Mayor John Tory recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct the City Manager and Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer to develop the 2020 to 2029 tax-supported capital plan incorporating the additional revenue generated by an increase to the City Building Levy for priority transit and housing capital projects.  The increase to the City Building Levy would start by adding 1 percent in 2020 and 2021 to the existing 0.5 percent increment, and an additional 1.5 percent annually from 2022-2025, inclusively.

Summary

I write to you today ahead of what I expect to be another tough budget year for our city.

 

Toronto is booming – we are the fastest growing city in North America. But over the last year, it has become clear as we have examined our long-term transit and affordable housing needs and finalized our plans to build up Toronto, that we need to invest in our future to accommodate that growth and to protect our city's success.

 

Just a few months ago, for the first time, Toronto Transit Commission staff determined that the Toronto Transit Commission State of Good Repair needs and capital requirements necessary to support ridership growth to be $33 billion over the next 15 years – over $20 billion of which is just to upgrade and maintain our existing subway system.

 

We also know that over the next 10 years, through our HousingTO Action Plan, the City, the province and the federal government will all be asked to contribute $8 billion each to ensure we are building more affordable housing – homes for young professionals, families, and seniors who want to live here in our city, as well as supportive housing for those who need it.

 

Each and every year that I have been Mayor, we have worked to find efficiencies to keep the cost of the City government low so we can invest in key services like transit, recreation and community safety, while keeping the annual property tax increase for the operating budget at or below the rate of inflation, particularly out of deference to issues of affordability for lower income residents and seniors.

 

Three years ago we introduced a separate City Building Levy to help invest directly and only in major transit and housing capital initiatives, while limiting property tax increases for the day-to-day operating budget at inflation.

 

This dedicated levy ensured we have the funding to partner with the other governments to build SmartTrack stations within the city and transform Yonge-Bloor station for increased passenger capacity – something we need to do as we expand our transit system and make up for years of inattention.

 

But we know the work to make sure our house is kept in good order is never done.

 

The Ernst & Young study before Executive Committee today identifies millions in efficiencies that we will be implementing in the 2020 Budget, and that will lead to tens of millions in repeated and expanded savings in the following years for our operating budget. These include measures such as contract compliance and changes to procurement.

 

But what the EY report also shows and what we are hearing from our professional City staff is that despite our continuing efforts to run an efficient, well-managed and responsible government, we need to do more to make sure we are actually building up our city.

 

We are saving millions a year – over the last five years we have saved $891 million - but we still need billions to build for the future and to invest in maintaining what we have built so far.

 

Building up the city will take investments from the federal and provincial governments. I have successfully secured billions from both those governments and I am committed to continuing to work to secure billions more over time from those governments to move our city forward - but it will also take us doing what we can at the municipal level to make these necessary additional investments.

 

The City of Toronto simply cannot wait for road tolls nor can we wait for a return of additional gas tax funding, both of which were denied us by successive provincial governments.

 

We cannot lament the current political climate as a reason for inaction in our city.

 

That is why I am proposing to extend the City Building Levy further into the future to raise approximately $6.6 billion to invest directly in our transit system – including new subway cars, new streetcars, station improvements, and signal upgrades – and in building more affordable housing across our city.

 

This is the right thing to do to build up our city and protect its prosperity.

 

By approving an extension of this levy – which would translate to a 1.5 per cent City Building Levy per year for the next six years - we can raise needed funds that will be

dedicated to improving our existing transit system and building more affordable housing across our city.

 

Ensuring this is dedicated funding, unlike our general property tax revenue, will protect it through this term and beyond so that it is collected and spent for one purpose and one purpose only - building up and investing in our transit and housing infrastructure.

 

You know I have not made this recommendation lightly but you also know that this funding is absolutely needed. It is the only way given the limited current tools available to us and the current political climate, that we can raise the billions of dollars we need to invest in the future of this city.

 

This funding will help raise the approximately $5 billion we need to invest in new subways, new subway signal systems, new streetcars, and station upgrades as our share of the almost $30 billion transit agreement with the province.

 

It will help fund affordable housing projects so that we hit our target of approving 40,000 housing units within the next 10 years.

 

I believe City Council is ready to move forward to build up our transit and our affordable housing.

 

I am confident that this is the best way forward to protect Toronto’s economic success which - given our economic power and the need for that prosperity to continue - is good for our city, our province and our country.

Background Information
(December 11, 2019) Letter from Mayor John Tory on City Building Fund
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-140989.pdf)

Communications
(December 11, 2019) E-mail from Elin Goulden (EX.New.EX11.26.1)