Agenda

Consolidated



Economic and Community Development Committee


Meeting No. 28   Contact Matthew Green, Committee Administrator
Meeting Date Thursday, March 24, 2022
  Phone 416-392-4666
Start Time 9:30 AM
  E-mail ecdc@toronto.ca
Location Council Chamber, City Hall/Video Conference
     


Economic and Community Development Committee

Councillor Michael Thompson, Chair

Councillor Mark Grimes, Vice Chair

Councillor Shelley Carroll

Councillor Joe Cressy

Councillor Michael Ford

Councillor Cynthia Lai

 

This meeting of the Economic and Community Development Committee will be conducted with members participating in person and remotely.  

Members of Council, City Officials, and members of the public who register to speak will be provided with the video conference details closer to the meeting date.

To provide comments or make a presentation to the Economic and Community Development Committee:

The public may submit written comments or register to speak to the Committee on any item on the agenda. The public may speak to the Committee in person or by video conference.

Written comments may be submitted by writing to ecdc@toronto.ca.

To speak to the Committee, please register by e-mail to ecdc@toronto.ca or by phone at 416-397-4592. Members of the public who register to speak will be provided with instructions on how to participate in the meeting.

 

Special Assistance for Members of the Public: City staff can arrange for special assistance with some advance notice. If you need special assistance, please call 416-397-4592, TTY 416-338-0889 or e-mail ecdc@toronto.ca.

 

Closed Meeting Requirements: If the Economic and Community Development Committee wants to meet in closed session (privately), a member of the Committee must make a motion to do so and give the reason why the Committee has to meet privately (City of Toronto Act, 2006).

 

Notice to People Writing or Making Presentations to the Economic and Community Development Committee: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its Committees and Boards. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City's website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it - such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address - available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

 

Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view. If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast. Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

 

If you want to learn more about why and how the City collects your information, write to the City Clerk's Office, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto ON M5H 2N2 or call 416-397-4592.


toronto.ca/council

 

This agenda and any supplementary materials submitted to the City Clerk can be found online at toronto.ca/council. Visit the website for access to all agendas, reports, decisions, and minutes of City Council and its Committees and Boards.

 

Declarations of Interest under the Municipal Conflict of Interest Act

 

Confirmation of Minutes - January 21, 2022

 

Speakers/Presentations - The speakers list will be posted online at 8:30 a.m. on March 24, 2022

 

Communications/Reports

 

EC28.1

Presentation 

 

 

Ward: All 

Economic Development and Culture - Quarterly Economic Outlook Update Presentation
Summary

The Economic Research Supervisor, Economic Development and Culture, will present an economic update to the Economic and Community Development Committee.

Background Information
Presentation from Adrienne Warren, PhD, Economic Research Supervisor, Economic Development on Economic Development and Culture - Quarterly Economic Outlook Update Presentation
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222845.pdf)


EC28.2

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Supporting Restaurants in Toronto - Recovery and Renewal
Origin
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Recommendations

The Interim General Manager Economic Development and Culture recommends that:

 

1. City Council amend Municipal Code Chapter 742, Sidewalk Cafés, Parklets and Marketing Displays, to extend the live music on cafes pilot for 2022 by adding a new subsection 742-9.9C as follows:

 

C. Despite Subsection A, from May 1, 2022 to November 7, 2022, inclusive, amplified sound on a sidewalk café is permitted if:

 

(1) the permit area is located in Ward 9, 10, 14 or 19;

(2) the amplified sound is played only between the hours of:

 

            (i) 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. on Thursday or Friday;

            (ii) Noon to 10:00 p.m. on Saturday; or

            (iii) Noon to 6:00 p.m. on Sunday;

 

(3) the permit area is not located on a local road;

(4) the permit holder complies with Chapter 591, Noise, at all times.

 

2. City Council direct the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, in consultation with the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards and General Manager, Transportation Services, to report back to City Council on the results of the pilot and the feasibility of expanding the program city-wide, including considerations for enforcement resources.

 

3. City Council direct the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture to report to the Economic and Community Development Committee on the results of the restaurant and hospitality industry survey and any implications for the City's support for the restaurant industry and future programs in the first quarter of 2023.

 

4. City Council authorize the General Manager, Transportation Services, in consultation with the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, to extend the CaféTO program until August 31, 2022 for cafés on the sidewalk which have already been approved under the program for a term ending on April 14, 2022; and amend Municipal Code Chapter 742, Sidewalk Cafés, Parklets and Marketing Displays, to add the following term to the definition for 2020/22 Café:

 

(6) a curbside café or frontage café which was also approved during the term described in Subsection (3) from no earlier than April 15, 2022 to no later than August 31, 2022, inclusive.

Summary

The restaurant industry has been disproportionally impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the past two years, the City has sought to both strengthen existing programs and to create enhanced supports for this struggling industry. The Economic Development and Culture division has been directed to create numerous new industry focused initiatives with the goal of understanding:

 

- How to best support the restaurant and hospitality sector through the COVID-19 pandemic;


- How to expand the geographic reach of restaurant industry support programs.
 

This report provides updates to key program activities including:

 

- CaféTO


- Amplified music on patios pilot


- Supporting the restaurant and hospitality industry outside downtown


- Marketing and financial supports available to the sector

Financial Impact

There are no financial implications arising from the recommendation in this report.

 

The continuation of the CaféTO program is supported through the 2022 Council Approved Operating Budgets for Economic Development and Culture, Transportation and Municipal Licensing and Standards.

 

Program funding to support small business and main street recovery as part of the Main Street Recovery and Renewal Initiative is also included in the 2022 Council Approved Operating Budget for Economic Development and Culture.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the statement as identified in the Financial Impact section.

Background Information
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Supporting Restaurants in Toronto - Recovery and Renewal
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222793.pdf)

Communications
(March 17, 2022) Letter from Albert Stortchak, Board Chair and Philip Kocev, Board Treasurer, Broadview Danforth Business Improvement Area (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146556.pdf)

(March 14, 2022) Letter from Billy Dertilis, Chair, Danforth Mosaic Business Improvement Area (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146557.pdf)

(March 10, 2022) Letter from Christiane Tetreault, Board Chair, Leslieville Business Improvement Area (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146576.pdf)

(March 24, 2022) Letter from Councillor Mike Layton, Ward 11, University - Rosedale (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146579.pdf)

(March 23, 2022) Letter from Clorraine Dennie, Coordinator, Pape Village Business Improvement Area (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146580.pdf)

(March 14, 2022) Letter from Jennifer Lay, Executive Director, Riverside Business Improvement Area (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146581.pdf)

(March 22, 2022) Letter from Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, Ward 25, Scarborough-Rouge Park (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146560.pdf)

(March 14, 2022) Letter from Tasneem Bandukwala, Manager, Gerrard India Bazaar Business Improvement Area (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146564.pdf)


EC28.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23 

Business Improvement Areas - 2022 Operating Budgets - Report 2
Origin
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
Recommendations

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer recommends that:  

 

1. City Council adopt and certify the 2022 recommended Operating Budgets and Levy requirements of the following Business Improvement Areas:

 

Business Improvement Area

2022 Operating Budget ($)

2022 Levy Funds Required ($)

Baby Point Gates

62,485

59,091

Bloor-Yorkville

4,400,815

4,171,580

CityPlace and Fort York

614,606

447,299

Corso Italia

289,553

228,581

Danforth Mosaic

748,112

365,883

Danforth Village

260,773

-

Dovercourt Village

23,743

7,909

Eglinton Hill

85,779

25,779

Emery Village

3,260,546

2,446,753

Harbord Street

33,449

13,024

Kennedy Road

283,048

256,135

Korea Town

156,527

77,163

Long Branch

180,072

160,292

MarkeTO District

256,188

106,039

Mimico by the Lake

64,744

52,812

Mimico Village

58,019

35,888

Mirvish Village

86,908

79,408

Mount Dennis

151,909

30,132

Queen Street West

799,308

306,733

Regal Heights Village

72,036

-

Rogers Road

71,321

39,996

Sheppard East Village

215,241

191,599

The Beach

444,396

384,487

Trinity Bellwoods

114,728

57,574

Upper Village

141,981

111,299

Uptown Yonge

335,546

251,040

Willowdale

1,112,073

1,003,664

Wilson Village

467,260

288,061

Wychwood Heights

185,063

29,039

York-Eglinton

435,948

115,777

Total

15,412,177

11,343,037

 

2. City Council adopt and certify the 2022 recommended Operating Budgets and Levy requirements for Bloor Annex Business Improvement Area, subject to approval by the Business Improvement Area's General Membership at its Annual General Meeting scheduled for March 24, 2022:

 

Business Improvement Area

2022 Operating Budget ($)

2022 Levy Funds Required ($)

Bloor Annex

311,306

276,826

Total

311,306

276,826

Summary

This report brings forward Business Improvement Area annual Operating Budgets for approval by City Council as required by the City of Toronto Act, 2006.  City Council approval is required to permit the City to collect funds through a special tax levy on the commercial and industrial properties within the respective Business Improvement Area boundaries.

 

There are currently 85 established Business Improvement Areas in the City of Toronto. City Council previously approved the 2022 Operating Budgets for 52 Business Improvement Areas through Report 1 at its meeting on February 2-3, 2022 (Item EC27.2). Included in this Report 2 is the 2022 Operating Budgets for 31 Business Improvement Areas for City Council approval. One Business Improvement Area, Historic Queen East, is inactive and one Business Improvement Area, Bloor Street, will not require an operating budget as the Business Improvement Area will be dissolved. A separate report entitled "Bloor Street Business Improvement Area - Dissolution of Board of Management and Repeal of Designating By-law" prepared by Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture is presented at the same Economic and Community Development Committee meeting scheduled for March 24, 2022. No City funding is required since the financing of Business Improvement Area Operating Budgets is raised by a special levy on the commercial and industrial properties within the respective Business Improvement Area boundaries.

 

The recommendation in this report reflects the board-adopted 2022 Operating Budgets by the respective Business Improvement Area Boards of Management and General Membership. Complete budgets and supporting documentation have been reviewed by City staff to ensure that the 2022 Operating Budgets for Business Improvement Areas reflect Council’s approved policies and practices.

 

It is noted that the 2022 recommended Operating Budget for the Bloor Annex Business Improvement Area is yet to be adopted by the General Membership. The Annual General Membership meeting is scheduled for March 24, 2022. In the event that the General Membership disagrees, City staff will bring forward a final report at the next opportunity to seek City Council approval of the 2022 Operating Budget for this particular Business Improvement Area.

Covid-19 impacts, including reduced levels of activity/expenditures, resulted in significantly increased net contributions to accumulated surplus reserves for most Business Improvement Areas during 2021. Accordingly, most Business Improvement Areas have been able to budget for withdrawals from the same reserves to minimize or eliminate Business Improvement Area levy increases for 2022.

Financial Impact

No City funding is required since the financing of Business Improvement Area Operating Budgets is raised by a special levy on the commercial and industrial properties within the respective Business Improvement Area boundaries. The 2022 Operating Budgets for the 31 Business Improvement Areas total $15,723,483 which requires a special tax levy in the amount of $11,619,863, reflecting a $543,508 or 5 percent increase in the special tax levy from 2021. All of the 2022 Business Improvement Area Operating Budgets submitted for consideration are balanced budgets which are funded by levies, funds from the Business Improvement Area's accumulated surplus, grants, donations, sponsorships, festival revenues, and other third party revenues. Detailed budgets of individual Business Improvement Areas discussed in this report are set out in Appendix A.

 

The Business Improvement Area Operating Budgets have provisions set aside for required capital cost-sharing contributions for those capital projects approved in 2021 or prior and carried forward into 2022, as well as new capital cost-share projects in the 2022-2031 Council Approved Capital Budget and Plan for Economic Development and Culture.

 

The dates at which the 2022 Operating Budgets were adopted by the respective Business Improvement Areas' Boards of Management and General Membership are provided in Appendix B.

Background Information
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer on Business Improvement Areas - 2022 Operating Budgets - Report 2
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222735.pdf)

Appendix A - Summary of 2022 Operating Budget by Business Improvement Area
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222736.pdf)

Appendix B - Status of Business Improvement Area 2022 Operating Budget Approvals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222737.pdf)


EC28.4

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 11 

Bloor Street Business Improvement Area - Dissolution of Board of Management and Repeal of Designating By-law
Origin
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Recommendations

The Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, recommends that:

 

1. City Council dissolve the Bloor Street Business Improvement Area Board of Management, and repeal By-law 69-2007, which established the Board of Management.

 

2. City Council repeal By-law 4519-2006, which designated the Bloor Street Business Improvement Area as defined by the boundaries described in Attachment 1.

 

3. City Council amend Municipal Code Chapter 19, Business Improvement Areas to delete all references to the Bloor Street Business Improvement Area.

 

4. City Council authorize the City Solicitor to prepare the by-laws necessary to dissolve the Bloor Street Business Improvement Area Board of Management; repeal the by-laws noted above and make the necessary amendments to Municipal Code Chapter 19.

 

5. City Council authorize the transfer of all Bloor Street Business Improvement Area assets and liabilities to the Bloor-Yorkville Business Improvement Area.

 

6. City Council direct the General Manager of Economic Development and Culture to negotiate and sign on behalf of the City, an agreement with Bloor-Yorkville Business Improvement Area to manage the Bloor Street Business Improvement Area's residual funds to cover the costs of the preparation of their 2021 audit, any assessment appeal overruns and any other financial liability of the Business Improvement Area.

Summary

The purpose of this report is to recommend the dissolution of the Bloor Street Business Improvement Area Board of Management and the repeal of the By-laws 519-2006 and 69-2007, which established the Bloor Street Business Improvement Area and the Board of Management, respectively. The report also recommends that City Council direct the City to enter into an agreement with Bloor-Yorkville Business Improvement Area authorizing the use of the Bloor Street Business Improvement Area residual funds for completion of the 2021 audit, potential appeal provision deficit and to cover outstanding Business Improvement Area financial liabilities, if any.

Financial Impact

The recommendations will have no financial impact on the City.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(March 10, 2022) Report and Attachment 1 from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Bloor Street Business Improvement Area - Dissolution of Board of Management and Repeal of Designating By-law
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222794.pdf)


EC28.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Updating Toronto's Business Incubation and Commercialization Grant Program
Origin
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Recommendations

The Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture recommends that:

 

1. City Council approve the updated program design for Toronto's Business Incubation and Commercialization Grant Program, substantially in accordance with the City of Toronto Business Incubation Grant Program Guidelines in Attachment 4 to this report, with implementation commencing in the second quarter of 2022.

 

2. City Council authorize the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture to negotiate and execute on behalf of the City grant agreements related to the Business Incubation and Commercialization Grant Program, for a term of no more than three years, in a form acceptable to the City Solicitor.

 

3. City Council authorize the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture to periodically review and, when necessary, revise the Business Incubation and Commercialization Grant Program Guidelines to ensure alignment with the City of Toronto's Community Grants Policy and any other applicable City policy, as may be amended from time to time, or reflect changing industry needs and best practices.

Summary

The primary purpose of this report is to propose updates to Toronto's Business Incubation and Commercialization Grant Program for non-profit incubators and accelerators. Informed by research and consultation with partners in Toronto's innovation ecosystem, these proposed changes will ensure that grants are awarded in a transparent, open and accountable manner in accordance with the City of Toronto's Community Grants Policy (2019) and the Economic Development and Culture Divisional Strategy 2018-2022 and Equity Plan.

 

The recommended changes to the Business Incubation and Commercialization Grant Program are designed to increase access to funding, clarify eligibility and evaluation criteria, and offer more predictable support to recipients through a multi-year grant stream. Together, these updates should result in administrative efficiencies, improved accountability, and increased support for equity-enhancing programs and services within Toronto's business start-up and innovation eco-system.

 

A secondary purpose of this report is to advise on broader mechanisms of municipal government support – historic, current and for future consideration – Toronto has or could make available to accelerators, incubators and the city's wider innovation ecosystem.

 

The following attachments accompany this report:

 

Attachment 1 – overview of the history of Toronto's support for accelerators and incubators;

Attachment 2 – summary of stakeholder feedback with staff recommendations on program improvements;

Attachment 3 – stakeholder engagement report; and

Attachment 4 – the proposed Business Incubation and Commercialization Grant Program Guidelines.

Financial Impact

Base funding to support the recommended updates to the Business Incubation and Commercialization Grant program, included in the Council Approved 2022 Operating Budget for Economic Development and Culture, is $1.501 million gross and net. Of this amount, it is expected that up to $1.245 million will be made available for grants to non-profit organizations, with the balance of $0.256 million supporting City administrative and operational expenses.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(March 10, 2022) Report and Attachment 1 from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Updating Toronto's Business Incubation and Commercialization Grant Program
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222738.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Summary of Stakeholder Feedback with Staff Recommendations on Program Improvement
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222739.pdf)

Attachment 3 - Business Incubation and Commercialization Program 2.0 - Research Summary Report, Code for Canada (December 2021)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222740.pdf)

Attachment 4 - City of Toronto Business Incubation and Commercialization Grant Program Guidelines
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222741.pdf)


EC28.6

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Authorization to Enter into a Funding Agreement for Enterprise Toronto
Origin
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Recommendations

The Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture recommends that:

 

1. City Council authorize the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture to negotiate and execute a two-year, plus possible one-year extension, Transfer Payment Agreement with the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade for the delivery of Enterprise Toronto programming, including funding from the Government of Ontario in the amount of $1,000,175 in each of 2022, 2023 and possibly 2024.

 

2. City Council increase the 2022 Approved Operating Budget for Economic Development and Culture by $1,000,175 gross, zero net, fully funded by a grant from the Government of Ontario, conditional upon conclusion of a Transfer Payment Agreement with the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade.

 

3. City Council direct the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture to include the Government of Ontario funding of $1,000,175 gross, zero net, towards the delivery of Enterprise Toronto programming in the 2023 and possibly 2024 Operating Budget submissions for Council consideration.

Summary

This report seeks City Council's authorization to enter into a two-year funding agreement plus possible one-year extension with the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade for Enterprise Toronto programming. Enterprise Toronto offers resources for residents and entrepreneurs wishing to start and grow a small business, and is one of 47 provincially funded Small Business Enterprise Centres across Ontario. Enterprise Toronto services are operated by the City of Toronto's Economic Development and Culture Division. The annual funding of $1,000,175 in each of 2022, 2023 and, potentially, 2024 made available through this agreement will enable the City to provide Enterprise Toronto services to small businesses and start-up companies across the city and support inclusive economic recovery and growth.

Financial Impact

The City's existing three year agreement with the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade for the expanded delivery of the Starter Company Program through Enterprise Toronto expires on March 31, 2022.

 

Under the new terms of agreement, the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade will provide the same level of annual funding to the City as the existing agreement. 

 

Accordingly, the 2022 Approved Operating Budget for Economic Development and Culture will increase by $1,000,175 gross, zero net, fully funded by the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade to provide funding for small business and start-up companies to start and grow their businesses. This annual funding will be part of the base operating budget for Economic Development and Culture in 2023 and potentially 2024 should a one-year extension option be exercised. 

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information

Background Information
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Authorization to Enter into a Funding Agreement for Enterprise Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222742.pdf)


EC28.7

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Review of the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation, Technology Financial Incentive Program
Origin
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning and the Controller
Recommendations

The Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, and the Controller, Finance and Treasury Services recommend that:

 

1. City Council direct the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, in consultation with the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer, the Chief Planner and Executive Director City Planning, and the City Solicitor, to initiate a review of the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Financial Incentive Program in 2022, based on the Terms of Reference as set out in Attachment 1.

 

2. City Council direct staff to report back to the Economic and Community Development Committee on the results of the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program Review and any recommended changes to the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program in the first quarter of 2023.

Summary

The Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Financial Incentive Program (the "Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program") provides incentives in the form of property tax increment grants to support the renovation or construction of buildings in targeted employment sectors and uses throughout Toronto. This report provides an overview of the economic and financial impacts of the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program and proposed Terms of Reference for the upcoming review of the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program.

 

Since the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program commenced in 2008, there have been 63 Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology applications approved in a wide range of employment sectors, representing almost $5.8 billion in total construction investment, 14.5 million square feet of new commercial/industrial space and the creation or retention of 70,000 jobs. In total, these new developments are expected to result in about $1.1 billion in new municipal taxes during the period in which the successful applicants receive grants. Of this amount, about $664 million will be returned to the property owners and tenants in the form of development grants, while about $436 million will be retained by the City. After each ten year payment term is complete the City then receives the full municipal tax on the property.

 

The Community Improvement Plans that implement the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program are reviewed periodically, typically four years after the by-law comes into full force and effect. In 2018, the previous review of the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program resulted in a new Community Improvement Plans by-law that consolidated the three previous Community Improvement Plans into a single city-wide by-law (By-law 1207-2018). The 2018 by-law remains under appeal and as such, the three previously adopted Community Improvement Plans by-laws remain in effect. The City continues to receive and review Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology applications under the 2012 Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology by-laws on a regular basis.

 

Despite the appeal of the 2018 by-law, it is recommended that a new review be initiated to ensure the mandate and objectives of the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program are being achieved in an efficient manner given the magnitude of the grant money being expended, and an altered investment and city-building context shaped by the COVID-19 pandemic, emergent markets and technology, and provincial policy changes among other factors. The review will result in recommendations for Council regarding whether the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Development Grant and related Brownfield Remediation Tax Assistance Grant programs should continue, be modified or terminated.

Financial Impact

The currently applicable Community Improvement Plan that enables the provision of financial incentives for economic development through the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program are By-Laws Numbers 1323-2012, 1324-2012 and 1325-2012. By-law Number 1207-2018 adopted by City Council in July 2018, remains under appeal to the Ontario Land Tribunal. Under the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology by-laws, the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program as a whole is required to be reviewed every four years.

 

As of the end of 2021, the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program has provided $207 million in grants since its inception. In addition, the estimated amount of grants that the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology Program is committed to provide until 2036 is $457 million. The total cumulative estimated value of Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation and Technology grants approved to date is therefore $664 million. Annual funding to provide incentives in the form of grants is included in the Non-Program Expenditure Operating Budget.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(March 10, 2022) Report and Attachment 1 from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning and the Controller, Finance and Treasury Services on Review of the Imagination, Manufacturing, Innovation, Technology Financial Incentive Program
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222792.pdf)


EC28.8

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 5, 8, 9, 12 

Little Jamaica Initiative - Master Plan and Aligned Initiatives - Introduction and Status Report
Origin
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture and the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning
Recommendations

The Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture and the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning recommend that:

 

1. The Economic and Community Development Committee receive this report for information.

Summary

The purpose of this report is to introduce the Little Jamaica Initiative, a multifaceted response to 26 City Council recommendations resulting from six Member's motions and provide a status update.

 

Approximately 50 years ago, the area along Eglinton Avenue West, also known as Little Jamaica, became an immigration settlement neighbourhood for newcomers from Jamaica and other Caribbean islands, and continues to serve as a distinct ethnic and cultural hub. The area is recognized for the clusters of Black-owned and operated businesses of cultural relevance and is internationally known for its contribution to the reggae genre of music. Similar to many neighbourhoods in Toronto, the area has enjoyed settlement from other newcomers, and has a rich Indigenous history closely connected to the numerous ravines and water tributaries that traverse through it.

 

Black community leaders and activists have called upon the City to formally recognize this area for its cultural heritage significance and to respond to years of underinvestment in the community and to address a number of challenges including a substantial loss of Black-owned and operated businesses and a lack of affordable retail/commercial spaces and residential rental units.

 

In response to Council's directions and calls to action from the community, an Interdivisional Team was established with membership from a number of City divisions with current mandates in Little Jamaica including actions to address anti-Black racism measures, mobility, housing, development review, and social development services. The Interdivisional Team has worked together to develop an approach that intends to align inclusive economic development, culture, people and place-making initiatives with an engagement process, using an equity, anti-Black racism and cultural lens.

 

The Interdivisional Team supports this work and coordinates a number of Aligned Initiatives. The Aligned Initiatives include specific work directed by Council and current on-going city-wide or area specific work, programs or initiatives that specifically impact Little Jamaica. The goal is to align all identified initiatives for a more impactful, relevant and effective response through the Little Jamaica Initiative. Some of the Aligned Initiatives include, support for Black-owned businesses in Little Jamaica through the Business Improvement Areas, advancing affordable housing initiatives including 20 Shortt Street, Economic Development and Culture's Cultural Hotspot, Youth Cultural Incubators Stabilization Initiative and ArtworxTO programs.

 

City Council also requested staff to develop a new Cultural Districts Program for Toronto. The city-wide Cultural Districts Program is currently being developed. The Cultural Districts Program will provide a set of tools to support cultural activities and small businesses that occupy all types of buildings and landscapes.

 

The engagement and work to develop the Little Jamaica Master Plan will begin prior to the finalization of the Cultural Districts Program. The Little Jamaica Master Plan and engagement strategy will be led by a Program Advisor and will result in the implementation of culturally responsive tools and policies that support and contribute to the cultural identity and significance of the area, manage growth and development, advance social equity and economic inclusion for current and future residents to grow in place and guide investment in infrastructure and services.

 

This report provides an introduction and a status update on the Little Jamaica Initiative and its two streams of work – the Master Plan and Aligned Initiatives.

Financial Impact

There are no immediate financial impacts arising from the actions contained in this report. Funding is included for the development of the Little Jamaica Master Plan in the 2022 Approved Operating Budgets for Economic Development and Culture and City Planning. There may be financial implications associated with Little Jamaica initiatives in future years and staff will report back to identify these costs and include them as part of the future budget processes for consideration.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(March 10, 2022) Report and Attachments 1 - 8 from the Interim General Manager, Economic Development and Culture and the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on Little Jamaica Initiative - Master Plan and Aligned Initiatives - Introduction and Status Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222764.pdf)

Communications
(March 23, 2022) Letter from Councillor Josh Matlow, Ward 12, Toronto - St. Paul's (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146582.pdf)


EC28.9

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

COVID-19 Shelter Transition and Relocation Plan Update
Confidential Attachment - Refers to a position, plan or instruction to be applied to negotiations carried out or to be carried out by or on behalf of the City of Toronto
Origin
(March 14, 2022) Report from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management and the Chief Procurement Officer, Purchasing and Materials Management
Recommendations

The General Manager Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management, and the Chief Procurement Officer, Purchasing and Materials Management recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management, in consultation with the General Manager of Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to exercise any options to extend currently included in the existing lease and licence agreements for the properties identified in Attachment 1, Table 1, and on such other or amended terms and conditions as may be deemed appropriate by the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management, in consultation with the General Manager of Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, and in a form acceptable to the City Solicitor.

 

2.  City Council authorize the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management, in consultation with the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to negotiate and approve further lease/licence extensions in relation to any property identified in Attachment 1, Table 1, in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor, provided that the proposed business terms for any such future lease/licence extensions generally reflect the terms and conditions contemplated for that property in Confidential Attachment 1, and on such other or amended terms and conditions as may be deemed appropriate by the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management, in consultation with the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, provided that required funding is available in an approved budget and that no such extension shall extend later than April 30, 2023 without securing further City Council approval.

 

3.  City Council authorize the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management, in consultation with the General Manager of Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to negotiate and settle the terms and amount of restoration costs, as may be required for any of the 13 leases and license agreements listed in Confidential Attachment 1, and on such other or amended terms and conditions as may be deemed appropriate by the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management, in consultation with the General Manager of Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, and in a form acceptable to the City Solicitor, provided that funding is available in an approved budget, subject to the instructions to staff for such costs, as set out in Confidential Attachment 1.

 

4.  City Council authorize the public release of Confidential Attachment 1 to the report upon the expiration of the last agreement of the leased and/or licensed premises, as Confidential Attachment 1 contains instructions to be applied to negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the City of Toronto.

 

5.  City Council authorize the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration and/or the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management to enter into the necessary amending agreements on terms and conditions satisfactory to the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration and/or Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor to increase the value and extend the term of the fifteen (15) existing non-competitive blanket contracts/purchase orders and five (5) existing competitive blanket contracts outlined in Attachment 1, Table 3, 4 and 5.

 

6.  City Council, in accordance with Section 195-8.5E of City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 195, Purchasing, authorize the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration to enter into and execute an agreement with the successful proponent below who has satisfied all requirements set out in Request for Proposal Document Number 3002340572 for the provision of short-term accommodations for shelter clients through the use of hotel/motel services for operated shelters, on terms and conditions set out in the Request for Proposal and satisfactory to the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor, as follows:

 

a.  Kingston Residence Incorporated (formerly New Lido Incorporated) for an initial term of one year from the date of award in the amount of $1,000,000 excluding all taxes ($1,017,600 net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries), with the option to renew for four separate additional one-year periods in the amount of $1,000,000 each excluding all taxes ($1,017,600 net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries), for a total potential contract value of $5,000,000 excluding all taxes ($5,088,000 net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries)

 

7. City Council, in accordance with Section 71-11.1C of City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 71, Financial Control, authorize the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management to enter into the necessary amending agreements on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management,  and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor to increase the value (and extend the term, as outlined in Recommendations 7.a to 7.b below) of the following contracts:

 

a.  Blanket Contract Number 47023936 with Star Security Inc. in the amount of $19,543,536 net of all taxes ($19,887,502 net of Harmonized Sales Tax Recoveries) for the provision of contracted security guard services, increasing and extending the contract value from $9,957,677 to $29,141,213 net of all taxes ($29,647,098 net of Harmonized Sales Tax Recoveries) for the period ending October 10, 2023;

 

b.  Blanket Contract Number 47023937 with Garda Canada Security Corporation in the amount of $8,134,715 net of Harmonized Sales Tax ($8,277,886 net of Harmonized Sales Tax Recoveries) for the provision of contracted security guard services, increasing and extending the contract value from $6,255,564 to $14,390,279 net of all taxes ($14,643,548 net of Harmonized Sales Tax Recoveries) for the period ending October 10, 2023.

 

8.  City Council authorize the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to enter into grant agreements as needed with at least three non-profit organizations to provide temporary accommodation and related supports for approximately 750 refugee claimants outside of the base City’s emergency shelter system, with a total expenditure of up to $15,169,745, on such terms and conditions as are satisfactory to the General Manager, and in a form approved by the City Solicitor. 

 

9.  City Council direct the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to report back to Economic and Community Development Committee in the first quarter of 2023 with an update on phase 1 of the Shelter Transition and Relocation Plan outlined in this report and next steps for phase 2 of the plan in 2023.

 

10.  City Council direct the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration to amend the Toronto Shelter Standards Directive related to physical distancing to introduce safe, moderate increase of capacity in base shelter sites where feasible, while maintaining public health measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

 

11.  City Council direct the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration to update and implement changes to the Toronto Shelter Standards as needed to strengthen safety and quality in the shelter system with a lens on equity and inclusion.

 

12.  City Council reiterate its requests to the Federal and Provincial Governments to:

 

a.  continue to provide funding to deliver the COVID-19 response for people experiencing homelessness to allow for the implementation of the phased implementation of the transition plan while ensuring stabilization of the homelessness service system through to recovery;

 

b.  provide ongoing and sustainable funding to ensure that appropriate primary health care, harm reduction, overdose prevention and mental health case management services are available to adequately support individuals who are homeless and implement the shelter health services framework to provide a coordinated and consistent approach to health services across the shelter system;

 

c.  establish and implement an immediate federal and provincial intergovernmental strategy for large scale arrivals of refugee claimants to ensure appropriate supports are in place across Ontario, including reception programs and facilities outside of Toronto (especially near ports of entry), coordination to refer new arrivals across the province, and providing direct funding to refugee houses and refugee specific shelter providers in strategic locations across Ontario, including Toronto; and

 

d.  recognize that permanent solutions to ending chronic homelessness are not possible without increased, long-term funding commitments and provide the capital and ongoing operating funding needed to meet the City of Toronto's supportive housing targets of 1,800 new supportive housing units every year for 10 years.

Summary

This report provides an update on the COVID-19 Shelter Transition and Relocation Plan and outlines a phased workplan over the next 24 months. It requests the authorities required to implement this plan for 2022 and 2023, including the authority to enter into lease/licence extensions and agreements at emergency shelter program hotels and services to support those programs.

 

Over the past two years, the shelter system has undergone significant and dramatic transformation to respond to the unprecedented situation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. These actions have undoubtedly saved the lives of people experiencing homelessness, some of the most vulnerable people in our community.

 

While many of the pandemic measures introduced in the broader community are now lifting as a result of the provincial re-opening plan, or are anticipated to change in the coming months, in high-risk congregate settings like emergency shelters, similar to Long-Term Care Homes, continued measures are still recommended and a cautious approach is needed both to ensure continued vigilance against any future resurgence of COVID-19 and to ensure that learning from the pandemic contributes to a stronger and more effective shelter system going forward.

 

The significant changes introduced within the shelter system to respond to the pandemic while maintaining capacity – including opening of 27 new shelter locations for physical distancing - were implemented over the past two years and are not possible to suddenly reverse overnight but will require a planned and gradual transition. The events of the past two years have also created significant resource and staffing capacity challenges across the sector, similar to those challenges facing many other sectors, and further change, while required as part of the transition, needs to ensure the homelessness sector is not further destabilized. For these reasons, the transition plan outlined in this report is recommended to be phased in over the next 24 months.

 

There are currently 27 temporary shelter sites supporting the City's emergency COVID-19 response, serving approximately 3,200 people nightly to support physical distancing and to provide spaces for people to move indoors from encampments. These temporary sites are now providing approximately 40% of the total spaces in the City's shelter system. Approval of the recommendations in this report will ensure that these critical emergency shelter spaces are available for those in need beyond April 30, 2022, while the phased transition plan is implemented.

 

Along with the need for a gradual transition from the temporary sites, this report is not recommending a full return to the pre-COVID situation in the shelter system. While many of the restrictions in the broader community are being lifted, within congregate living settings like shelters, continued measures to protect against the spread of COVID-19 and other diseases is needed to protect vulnerable people. A vision for the future of the shelter system, based on learning from the experience of the pandemic and building on the Shelter Design and Technical Guidelines and the housing-focused service model set out in the Homelessness Solutions Service Plan will guide this transition, and capitalize on the opportunity to shape a housing and equity focused recovery. Investments in new affordable and supportive homes through the 24-Month Housing and Homelessness Plan are a significant opportunity to provide better outcomes for people, and shift from emergency responses to more permanent solutions.

 

At the same time, the shelter system continues to face significant pressures. The anticipated number of new arrivals of refugee claimants may surpass what was seen in 2018 and 2019. Ongoing uncoordinated release of people from provincial institutions like correctional and health facilities without adequate housing plans in place contribute to these pressures. In addition, economic uncertainty, eviction rates and a continuing worsening in housing affordability are putting more people at risk of homelessness.

 

This report identifies a recommended approach to transition that includes six core components of work which are currently underway and form the basis for the transition workplan. The report seeks City Council approval to extend the use of  sites currently serving as temporary shelters for COVID-19 response that have lease or agreement end dates in 2022. Another 10 temporary shelter sites that have existing authorities will continue operating as needed in 2023 and beyond. As part of phase 1 of the transition plan over the next 12 months, up to five temporary sites will be decommissioned. Based on learning from the first phase, decommissioning more sites is planned for phase 2 in 2023. If current projections change, the timelines for the plan will be revisited.

 

As part of the first phase, key indicators will be monitored and tracked to measure shelter demand and progress in implementing the transition plan. As new supportive and affordable housing opportunities become available for people experiencing chronic homelessness, existing shelter capacity will be freed up to be used for its originally intended purpose of short-term, emergency shelter, and advancing the City's goal of ensuring homelessness is rare, brief and non-recurring.

Financial Impact

This report requests Council authority to:

 

Amend and extend leases and licences at twelve (12) emergency shelter program hotels to support the City's COVID-19 shelter response at a total estimated cost of up to $49.13 million net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries in 2022 and up to $26.84 million net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries in 2023;

 
Amend fifteen (15) existing non-competitive blanket contracts and purchase orders for various services supporting the operation of the City's COVID-19 shelter response at a total estimated cost of up to $45.86 million net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries in 2022 and up to $22.93 million net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries in 2023;

 
Amend three (3) existing competitive blanket contracts for various services supporting the operations of the City's COVID-19 shelter response at a total estimated cost of up to $4.75 million net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries in 2022 and up to $2.37 million net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries in 2023; and
         

Amend two (2) existing competitive blanket contracts for security services supporting the operations of the City's COVID-19 response initiative at a total estimated cost of up to $14.36 million net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries in 2022 and up to $13.81 million net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries in 2023.

 
Enter into and execute an agreement with the successful proponent below who has satisfied all requirements set out in Request for Proposal Document Number 3002340572 for the provision of short-term accommodations for shelter clients through the use of hotel/motel services for operated shelters

 

Enter into grant agreements with three (3) not-for-profit entities and/or organizations to provide the temporary accommodation of up to 750 refugee claimants who are experiencing homelessness in Toronto in an effort to avoid needing to utilize the emergency shelter system, for a total expenditure of up to $15.17 million net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries in 2022. There are no added costs in 2023.

 

The total cost for 2022 is up to an estimated $130.29 million net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries and up to an estimated $66.97 million net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries in 2023. See Table 1 below for details.  

 

Table 1 - Total Estimated Costs of Requested Extensions, Should All Options be Exercised

 

Cost in Millions

 

 

Total Costs for 2022 Net of Harmonized Sales Tax Recoveries

Total Costs for 2023 Net of Harmonized Sales Tax Recoveries

Extending Lease and Licences for 12 Temporary Shelter Sites

49.13

26.84

Amending 15 Non-Competitive Blanket Contracts/Purchase Orders

45.86

22.93

Amending and Extending 3 Competitive Blanket Contracts

4.75

2.37

Amending 2 Competitive Contracted Security Guard Blanket Contracts

14.73

13.81

Enter into 1 Competitive Contract for the provision of short-term accommodations for shelter clients through the use of hotel/motel services

1.02

1.02

Enter into grant agreements with three (3) not-for-profit entities and/or organizations to support new refugee program

15.17

0

Total

130.29

66.97

 

Funding of $288.34 million is included in the 2022 Shelter, Support and Housing Administration Approved Operating Budget to support the City's COVID-19 shelter response operations and has been allocated to the various cost items summarized in Table 2. Accordingly, the request to extend twelve (12) hotel leases and to extend fifteen (15) non-co0mpletive blanket contracts and five (5) competitive contracts and three (3) grant agreements estimated up to $130.29million is covered by Shelter, Support and Housing Administration's remaining uncommitted 2022 budget of $192.22 million.

 

Table 2 - Total Estimated Costs of 2022 COVID-19 Shelter Response Operations

 

Cost in Millions

 

2022 Budget

 

January 1st to April 30th Committed

May 1st to Dec 31st 2022 Uncommitted

Staffing

             24.56

                     8.19

                   16.37

Room Rent

           110.77

                   36.92

                   73.85

Food

             26.28

                     8.76

                   17.52

Security*

             24.87

                     10.51

                   14.36

Others (Personal Protective Equipment, rental of equipment, laundry, etc.)

           101.86

                   31.74

                   70.12

Total

           288.34

                   96.12

                 192.22

  

The extension of the twelve (12) hotel leases and the extension and amendment of the fifteen (15) non-competitive blanket contracts and five (5) competitive contracts into 2023, if required, will result in $66.97 million  net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries impact in 2023 if all options are exercised. The financial implications of continuing the City's COVID-19 Shelter Response will be considered for funding along with other City priorities, public health requirements and available federal-provincial funding through the 2023 budget process.

 

Refer to Confidential Attachment 1 and Attachment 1 for additional details on the extension agreements and non-competitive blanket contracts/purchase orders and competitive blanket contract amendments.

 

Refer to Attachment 1 for additional details on the award of Request for Proposal Number 3002340572.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impacts associated with this report as contained in the Financial Impact Section, Confidential Attachment 1, and Attachment 1 to this report.

Background Information
(March 24, 2022) Presentation from Gord Tanner, Director, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration on COVID-19 Shelter Transition and Relocation Plan Update
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-223143.pdf)

(March 14, 2022) Report from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, the Executive Director, Corporate Real Estate Management and the Chief Procurement Officer, Purchasing and Materials Management on COVID-19 Shelter Transition and Relocation Plan Update
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222833.pdf)

Attachments 1 - 5
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222834.pdf)

Confidential Attachment 1
Communications
(March 18, 2022) E-mail from Mary Mitar (EC.Supp)
(March 18, 2022) E-mail from Adil Dharssi (EC.Supp)
(March 18, 2022) E-mail from Dr. Albert Tan (EC.Supp)
(March 19, 2022) E-mail from Rachel Pomedli (EC.Supp)
(March 20, 2022) E-mail from Peter Hinton (EC.Supp)
(March 20, 2022) E-mail from Susan Rodgers (EC.Supp)
(March 21, 2022) E-mail from Min Liu (EC.Supp)
(March 21, 2022) E-mail from Nicole Caty (EC.Supp)
(March 21, 2022) Submission from Ansuya Pachai (EC.Supp)
(March 21, 2022) E-mail from Min Liu (EC.Supp)
(March 21, 2022) E-mail from Sonia Brar (EC.Supp)
(March 22, 2022) E-mail from Annette Robertson (EC.Supp)
(March 23, 2022) E-mail from Carolyn Shaw (EC.Supp)
(March 23, 2022) E-mail from Jerry Hammack (EC.Supp)
(March 23, 2022) Letter from Cathy Crowe (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146540.pdf)

(March 23, 2022) Letter from Amarjeet Kaur Chhabra, UNITE HERE Local 75 (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146541.pdf)

(March 23, 2022) Letter from Jessica Hales, Nurse Practitioner, Regent Park Community Health Centre (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146545.pdf)

(March 23, 2022) E-mail from Carol Hood (EC.Supp)
(March 23, 2022) Letter from Dr. A.J. Withers for the Shelter and Housing Justice Network Adjunct Faculty (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146525.pdf)

(March 23, 2022) E-mail from Stephan Goslinski (EC.New)
(March 23, 2022) E-mail from Kenneth Smith (EC.New)
(March 24, 2022) Letter from Diana Chan McNally, Training and Engagement Coordinator, Toronto Drop-in Network (EC.New)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146562.pdf)

(March 24, 2022) Letter from Sonja Nerad, Interim Executive Director, Toronto Shelter Network  (EC.New)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146563.pdf)

(March 24, 2022) Letter from Kira Heineck, Executive Director, Toronto Alliance to End Homelessness (EC.New)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146566.pdf)

(March 24, 2022) E-mail from Jennifer Fultz (EC.New)
(March 24, 2022) Submission from Melissa Goldstein (EC.New)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146584.pdf)

(March 24, 2022) E-mail from Christopher Brown (EC.New)
(March 23, 2022) E-mail from Andy Do (EC.New)

EC28.10

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Final Recommendations on the UrbanHensTO Backyard Hens Pilot Program
Public Notice Given
Origin
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards
Recommendations

The Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards recommends that:  

 

1. City Council amend City of Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 349, Animals, as follows:

 

Creating a permanent city-wide UrbanHensTO program

 

1. Add the following definitions to Section 349-1:

 

a. COOP: a fully-enclosed weatherproof structure where hens are kept and the interior of which includes enough nest boxes for egg laying, perches for hens to roost on and food and water containers for the number of hens being housed.

 

b. HEN: Means a domesticated female chicken that is at least four months old.

 

2. Amend section 349-4.1 as follows:

 

a. Replace "pilot program" with the word "program" throughout.

 

b. Replace current wording in subsection A that established the pilot program with "The Executive Director is authorized to establish a program to permit the keeping of hens in accordance with this section".

 

3. Remove the restricted zones for the hens program, and remove Schedule B - ZONES FOR HENS PILOT PROJECT

 

Enhanced program requirements

 

4. Amend section 349-4.1B to specify that participants in the program must either be the owner or lawful occupant of the property where the hens are to be kept or have written approval from the owner of the land where the hens will be kept, and amend the section's requirements to recognize both kinds of program participants.

 

5. Amend section 349-4.1B(3) to clarify that apartment or condominium units or properties without sufficient outdoor space to house hens as determined by the Executive Director are not permitted to register or participate in the program.

 

6. Amend section 349-4.1B(5), which permits City staff to attend and inspect a property registered in the program, to require that registered participants  pay a re-inspection fee in accordance with Municipal Code Chapter 441, Fees and Charges for any re-inspection of their hen enclosure property.

 

7. Add a new subsection to 349-4.1, B.1 Registration, that contains the following registration and program requirements for participation in the permanent UrbanHensTO program:

 

a. No person shall keep hens in the City unless they have registered in accordance with this section.

 

b. A person wishing to keep hens shall register for each property where hens are to be kept every 12 months and shall pay the specified registration or renewal fee.

 

c. Require that a registration application contain the following information:

 

i.  the applicant's name and contact information, including the address where the hens will be kept, e-mail address and telephone number;

 

ii. where the applicant is not the owner or lawful occupant of the property where the hens are to be kept, written approval from the property owner permitting hens to be kept at the property;

 

iii. the number of hens to be kept at the property;

 

iv. whether the hens kept at the property are rented, and if so, the name of the rental company and contact information for the rental company and the duration that the hens will be rented;

 

v. a site-plan showing the dimensions and location of the outdoor hen enclosure including a coop, on the property, the distance between the outdoor hen enclosure and other buildings and property boundaries, and any other information required by the Executive Director;

 

vi. proof of completion of a hen keeping education course approved by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs to the satisfaction of the Executive Director;

 

vii. any other information required by the Executive Director.

 

d. Require that registered participants  update the City immediately with respect to any change to information provided in their registration application.

 

e. Require that on receipt of a registration application, an inspection of the property as required by the Executive Director shall be completed prior to the applicant being permitted to keep any hens.

 

f. Allow the Executive Director to refuse an application if the application does not comply with section 349-4.1, the  requirements or the standards established by the Executive Director are not met, the applicant has not paid the required fees,  the application contains false or misleading information, or if approval would jeopardize public health, the health of the hen or cause community disruption.

 

Seizure, impoundment and redemption of hens

 

8. Add a new sub-section, 349-4.1F to include the following  seizure and impoundment provisions:

 

a. Any hen found at large contrary to the provisions of this chapter may be seized and impounded by the Executive Director.

 

b. Where, in the opinion of the Executive Director, a hen seized under Subsection (1) is injured or ill and should be euthanized without delay for humane reasons or the safety of persons, the hen may be euthanized by the Executive Director without permitting any person to reclaim the hen.

 

c. Any hen seized by the Executive Director under Subsection (1) shall be impounded for a minimum period of 24 hours from the time of its impoundment, exclusive of the day on which the hen was impounded, and days on which the animal centre is closed, during which time the owner shall be entitled to redeem the hen.

 

d. If a hen is not redeemed within the time period referred to in Subsection (3),  the hen shall become the property of the City and the City may:

 

i. Transfer ownership of the hen; or

 

ii. Euthanize the hen.

 

e. Where a hen is seized and impounded by the Executive Director under Subsection (1), a daily impoundment fee for daily care, feeding and sheltering shall be paid by the owner to the Executive Director, in advance of redeeming the hen, for the amount specified in Chapter 441, Fees and Charges;

 

f. Where a hen seized and impounded by the Executive Director under Subsection (1) is injured or ill and receives veterinary care necessary for the well-being of the hen, the Executive Director shall, in addition to any amount charged pursuant to Subsection (5), be entitled to charge the person claiming the hen under this article the cost of the veterinary care to the Executive Director.

 

Suspension of permits

 

9. Amend section 349-4.1D to authorize the Executive Director to suspend any participant from the program for the duration of their current registration period who, in the opinion of the Executive Director, is not in compliance with section 349-4.1, the program or standards established by the Executive Director and/or has taken any action or failed to take any action that has jeopardized public health, or the health of a hen, or caused community disruption. 

 

Extending the current pilot program until Bylaw changes come into effect

 

10. Add a provision that any person registered under the current hens pilot program may continue to keep hens provided they register under the new hens program by April 1, 2023, and have a site inspection completed by Toronto Animal Services, and complete the education course by April 1, 2024.

 

2. City Council direct the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards to establish standards for community hen keeping projects (where the program participant is not the owner or lawful occupant of the property where the hens are to be kept, is not keeping hens in a backyard, and is keeping hens to support community goals. The project may be associated with a community or non-profit organization.) under the Executive Director's authority in section 349-4.1C and direct that registration and inspection fees not be charged for such registered properties.

 

3. City Council amend City of Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 441, Fees and Charges, as follows:

 

Table 1 - Recommended hen keeping licensing fees be included in Chapter 441

 

Reference Number

Service Fee

Description

 

Category

 

Fee Basis

 

Fee

 

Annual Adjustment

New

Pet Licence Issuance

Amount for registration of a backyard hen flock.

Full Cost Recovery

Per application

$151.00

Yes

New

Pet Licence Issuance

Amount for backyard hen flock renewal

Full Cost Recovery

Per renewal

$34.00

Yes

New

Pet Licence Issuance

Re-Inspection fee: backyard hen enclosure

Full Cost Recovery

Per inspection

$111.50

Yes

New

Pet Licence Issuance

Impound fee hen. The first day of care in the animal shelter

Market Based

1st 24 Hours Or Part thereof per animal

$30.00

Yes

New

Pet Licence Issuance

Impound fee hen. The daily care, food and board of animal.

Market Based

Subsequent per Diem per animal

$10.00

Yes

New

Shelter and Care

Protective Care hen

City Policy

1st 24 Hours Or Part thereof per flock

$40.00

Yes

New

Shelter and Care

Protective Care hen

City Policy

Subsequent per Diem per flock

$10.00

Yes

 

4. City Council direct that the amendments to City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 349, Animals, and Chapter 441, Fees and Charges, described in recommendations 1 to 3 come into effect April 1, 2023, and that the current pilot project in section 349-4.1 be extended until March 31, 2023. 

 

5. City Council direct the City Solicitor to prepare the necessary bill(s) required to give effect to Council's decision and to make any necessary minor substantive or stylistic refinements as may be identified by the City Solicitor.

Summary

This report outlines findings from a final review of the UrbanHensTO backyard hens pilot program. The report recommends that the program be made permanent and expanded city-wide based on the successful results of the pilot. Overall, there have been no significant issues with the pilot program and complaints related to the pilot and hen keeping city-wide have been low. The program has provided benefits to participants such as access to fresh local eggs, educational opportunities related to food systems and urban agriculture, and has supported mental health, as noted by program participants.

 

There is public support for hen keeping among Toronto residents and the majority of stakeholders consulted support program expansion. Additional resources and enhanced registration requirements for hen owners (for example, annual flock registration and cost recovery fees, a pro-active site inspection, and required education) are recommended in this report. It is anticipated that the proposed additional requirements, in addition to the existing terms and conditions of the pilot program, will mitigate nuisance, public health, and animal welfare concerns related to expansion.

 

Expanding the program city-wide will increase equitable geographic access and allow more diverse neighbourhoods to participate. To further improve equitable access, staff are also recommending community hen keeping projects be considered on a case-by-case basis, in partnership with other City divisions and community organizations to help address individual cost barriers and allow residents without sufficient private outdoor space to participate in the program.

 

Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 349, Animals, currently prohibits animals in the order Galliformes (which includes hens), with the exception of hens registered under the UrbanHensTO pilot program. The UrbanHensTO pilot program began on March 2, 2018 and allows registered households to have up to four hens for the purposes of enjoyment and personal egg production; roosters are prohibited and hens cannot be raised as livestock to eat. The pilot program applies to four former City of Toronto wards (Wards 5, 13, 21, and 32). As a result of ward changes in 2018, the program currently applies to some parts of Wards 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, 14, and 19. Following City Council's decision in December 2020 to extend the pilot for one additional year, the pilot will expire on March 31, 2022.

 

City staff undertook a final review of the pilot program beginning in late fall 2021. The review included consultations with various City divisions as well as food policy and animal health and welfare stakeholders. Public opinion research and a public survey to solicit feedback on the future of the program were also conducted. Key considerations during the review included impacts on food security and food sovereignty, access to veterinary care, animal health and welfare, public health and nuisance, and equity impacts.

 

Staff recommend that bylaw amendments come into effect as of April 1, 2023 to implement the city-wide permanent backyard hen-keeping program, and that the current pilot program be extended until this date.

 

This report was developed in consultation with Toronto Public Health.

Financial Impact

The recommendations contained in this report have no financial impacts on the 2022 budget; however, recommendations related to the expansion and enhancement of the UrbanHensTO program will have future financial impacts.

 

Municipal Licensing and Standards projects that program implementation costs in 2023 may have a total annualized impacts of up to $347,000 on the operating budget. These costs are associated with hiring up to three additional Animal Control Officers.

 

Municipal Licensing and Standards projects that in the first two years of the program, registration revenues will be $211,400, with $62,440 additional revenue from re-inspection fees. After the first two years, Municipal Licensing and Standards projects annual revenue of $47,600 from licensing renewal fees based on the proposed fees and projected program uptake.

 

Municipal Licensing and Standards will request the funding required to implement the program through the 2023 operating budget process for consideration. This request may be combined with any budget requests for additional staff resources arising from the review of Chapter 349, Animals report expected at an upcoming 2022 Economic and Community Development Committee meeting.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards on Final Recommendations on the UrbanHensTO Backyard Hens Pilot Program
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222783.pdf)

Attachment 1 - UrbanHensTO Pilot Program Terms and Conditions
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222784.pdf)

Attachment 2 - UrbanHensTO Public Opinion Research Final Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222785.pdf)

Attachment 3 - Summary of UrbanHensTO Review Research and Consultations
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222786.pdf)

Public Notice
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-223028.pdf)

Communications
(March 16, 2022) E-mail from L. McNaughton (EC.Supp)
(March 21, 2022) E-mail from Rachel Yanchyshyn (EC.Supp)
(March 22, 2022) E-mail from Kathy Bocsi (EC.Supp)
(March 23, 2022) E-mail from Kaila Newby (EC.Supp)
(March 23, 2022) Letter from Liz White, Director, Animal Alliance of Canada (EC.Supp)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/comm/communicationfile-146539.pdf)

(March 23, 2022) E-mail from Hella Comat (EC.New)

EC28.11

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Dangerous Dog Review Tribunal 2021 Annual Report
Origin
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards
Recommendations

The Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards recommends that: 

 

1. The Economic and Community Development Committee receive the 2021 Annual Report from the Chair, Dangerous Dog Review Tribunal, for information.

 

2. That City Council amend Municipal Code Chapter 349, Animals, to add the following as subsections 349-15C(3) and (4):

 

(3) Where an officer has concluded that a dog was acting in self-defence and elected not to issue an order to comply under Subsection C(2), that dangerous act will not be counted when determining if a subsequent dangerous act is the second or subsequent on record with the City under Subsection B(3).

 

(4) Where the Dangerous Dog Review Tribunal concludes that a dog was acting in self-defence at the time a dangerous act occurred and rescinded the determination of a dangerous dog on that basis, that dangerous act will not be counted when determining if a subsequent dangerous act is the second or subsequent on record with the City under Subsection B(3).

Summary

The Chair of the Dangerous Dog Review Tribunal must submit an annual report on the Tribunal's activities to the appropriate standing committee in accordance with its governance structure. Attached to this report is the Tribunal Chair's 2021 Annual Report.

 

The Tribunal is an adjudicative board and city and local board of the City of Toronto under the authority of the City of Toronto Act, 2006. Tribunal hearings are conducted in accordance with the Statutory Powers Procedure Act, 1990 and the Tribunal's rules of procedure. The Tribunal provides an independent consideration of appeals to Dangerous Dog Orders issued by Municipal Licensing and Standards under the authority of Section 349-15 of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 349, Animals. The Tribunal has the authority to either confirm the dangerous dog designation or rescind the dangerous dog designation and exempt the owner from requirements of a Dangerous Dog Order.

 

In 2021, Municipal Licensing and Standards responded to 1,994 service requests related to a dog's potential dangerous act and issued 103 Dangerous Dog Orders. Twelve Dangerous Dog Orders were appealed to the Dangerous Dog Review Tribunal in 2021, with three Orders being rescinded by the Tribunal. The Tribunal also received eight Requests for Review of its earlier decisions and reheard four appeals, resulting in two Tribunal decisions being reversed.

 

This report also responds to the recommendations in the Chair's Annual Report to amend Chapter 349, Animals, to allow for the appeal of a first non-severe dangerous dog act that results in written warning, to not issue a Dangerous Dog Order when a dangerous dog act is found by the Tribunal to be in self-defence, and to allow the Dangerous Dog Review Tribunal to customize the conditions attached to a license as it sees fit when confirming an Order.

 

Staff are recommending an amendment to Chapter 349, Animals, to clarify the language around how dangerous dog acts determined to have been done in self-defence are counted when combined with a second or subsequent act. This amendment would specify that a dangerous act done in self-defence would not "count" against a dog when determining whether to issue a dangerous dog order if coupled with a subsequent dangerous act. This aligns with the Chair's second recommendation and will provide greater clarity to Animal Services staff should this situation arise.

 

Staff have reviewed the other recommendations made by the Chair and, at this time, do not recommend amending Chapter 349, Animals, to allow for the appeal of written warnings or customize the conditions of a Dangerous Dog Order as they would fundamentally change the scope and purpose of the Tribunal.

Financial Impact

There is no financial impact arising from the recommendation contained in this report.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards on Dangerous Dog Review Tribunal 2021 Annual Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222767.pdf)

Attachment 1 - 2021 Annual Chairís Report for the Dangerous Dog Review Tribunal
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222768.pdf)

Communications
(March 21, 2022) E-mail from Rick Ross (EC.Supp)

EC28.12

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Communication Techniques for the Toronto East Community Awareness and Emergency Response Association's Siren Test Communications Plan
Origin
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Acting Fire Chief and General Manager - Emergency Management, Toronto Fire Services
Recommendations

The Acting Fire Chief and General Manager - Emergency Management, Toronto Fire Services recommends that:

 

1. The Economic and Community Development Committee receive this report for information.

Summary

This report responds to a request from the Economic and Community Development Committee that the Fire Chief and General Manager - Emergency Management, Toronto Fire Services report back on the progress made addressing the suggestions provided during the October 21, 2021 meeting of the Economic and Community Development Committee regarding the Toronto East Community Awareness and Emergency Response Association's and City of Toronto's Siren Test Communications Plan.

 

The Toronto East Community Awareness and Emergency Response Association maintains a siren system to alert residents of potential chemical hazards. The siren system is tested three times per year to ensure optimum performance and to increase public awareness of protective actions to be taken in the event of an environmental emergency. The Toronto East Community Awareness and Emergency Response Association worked with the City's' Office of Emergency Management and Strategic Public and Employee Communications to develop a Siren Test Communication Plan. The Toronto East Community Awareness and Emergency Response Association and Office of Emergency Management welcomed input and suggestions from the Economic and Community Development Committee to improve the Plan and have updated the Plan to incorporate the feedback provided during the October 21 2021 meeting.

Financial Impact

There is no financial impact resulting from the adoption of the recommendation in this report as any costs associated with improvements will be fully funded by the Toronto East Community Awareness and Emergency Response Association.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(March 10, 2022) Report from the Acting Fire Chief and General Manager - Emergency Management, Toronto Fire Services on Communication Techniques for the Toronto East Community Awareness and Emergency Response Association's Siren Test Communications Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222733.pdf)


EC28.13

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Amendment to Non-Competitive Purchase Order Number 6051977 with Ian Martin Information Technology Incorporated for the Provision of Administrative Services Required to Support the City's COVID-19 Response for Toronto Public Health
Origin
(March 9, 2022) Report from the Medical Officer of Health and Chief Procurement Officer, Purchasing and Materials Management
Recommendations

The Medical Officer of Health and the Chief Procurement Officer, Purchasing and Materials Management recommend that:

 

1. The Economic and Community Development Committee, in accordance with Section 71-11.1.C of the City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 71 (Financial Control), authorize the Medical Officer of Health to amend Purchase Order Number 6051977 with Ian Martin Information Technology Incorporated and increase the contract value by $250,000 net of all applicable taxes and charges ($254,400 net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries), increasing the current Purchase Order value from $400,000 net of all applicable taxes and charges ($407,040 net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries) to $650,000 net of all applicable taxes and charges ($661,440 net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries).

Summary

The purpose of this report is to request authority from the Economic and Community Development Committee to amend Purchase Order Number 6051977 issued to Ian Martin Information Technology Incorporated for the provision of administrative services required by Toronto Public Health to support the City's COVID-19 response. This report requests an amendment to increase the contract value by $250,000 net of all applicable taxes and charges ($254,400 net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries), increasing the contract value from $400,000 net of all applicable taxes and charges ($407,040 net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries) to $650,000 net of all applicable taxes and charges ($661,440 net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries).

 

Purchase Order Number 6051977 was previously initiated to support a number of rapidly evolving and changing administrative needs with the COVID-19 and Mass Immunization Response. Toronto Public Health continues to require these administrative services as public health units are expected to take all necessary measures to continue to respond to COVID-19 in their catchment areas and to maintain critical public health programs and services as identified in Board of Health approved pandemic plans.

 

Economic and Community Development Committee approval is required in accordance with Municipal Code Chapter 195, Purchasing, where the current request exceeds the threshold of $500,000 net of Harmonized Sales Tax allowed under staff authority as per the Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 71, Financial Control, Section 71-11.1(C).

Financial Impact

Funding for the requested Purchase Order Amendment in the amount of $250,000 net of all applicable taxes and charges ($254,400 net of Harmonized Sales Tax recoveries) is available in the 2022 Approved Operating Budget for Toronto Public Health. Additional funding details follow in Table 1.

 

Table 1 -  Financial Impact Summary

 

Cost Centre/ Cost Element

2022 (net of Harmonized Sales Tax Recoveries

PH4082/ C/E 4424 and 4995

$254,400

 

Toronto Public Health will seek reimbursement of the full cost incurred for administrative support services from the Ministry of Health as part of the Ministry's Extraordinary Cost Recovery Program.

 

The Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial implications as identified in the Financial Impact section.

Background Information
(March 9, 2022) Report from the Medical Officer of Health and the Chief Procurement Officer on Amendment to Non-Competitive Purchase Order Number 6051977 with Ian Martin Information Technology Incorporated for the Provision of Administrative Services Required to Support the City's COVID-19 Response for Toronto Public Health
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222763.pdf)


EC28.14

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Toronto Music Strategy
Origin
(March 10, 2022) Letter from the Toronto Music Advisory Committee
Recommendations

The Toronto Music Advisory Committee recommends that:

 

1. City Council adopt the Toronto Music Industry Strategy 2022-2026.

Summary

At its meeting on March 10, 2022, the Toronto Music Advisory Committee considered Item MA12.1 and made recommendation to City Council.

Background Information
(March 10, 2022) Letter from the Toronto Music Advisory Committee on Toronto Music Strategy
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222775.pdf)

Draft Toronto Music Industry Strategy 2022-2026
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-222776.pdf)


EC28.15

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 10 

Updating Toronto's Food Charter for All
Origin
(March 24, 2022) Letter from Councillor Joe Cressy, Ward 10, Spadina-Fort York
Recommendations

Councillor Joe Cressy recommends that:

 

1. City Council request the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration, to engage and work with residents disproportionately impacted by food insecurity, poverty, and other inequities in our food system, and with community groups working to defend the food rights of their communities, to update Toronto's Food Charter and report back on revisions to Toronto's Food Charter with plans for implementation, accountability, and resourcing as part of the Toronto Poverty Reduction Strategy 2023-2026 Term Action Plan.

Summary

In 1976, Canada signed the United Nations Covenant on Social, Economic, and Cultural Rights, including "the right to be free from hunger." Unfortunately, hunger and food insecurity are still a daily challenge for too many Torontonians, who struggle to access affordable, nutritious, culturally-appropriate food. Two years of the COVID-19 pandemic have only worsened these challenges and highlighted the ways in which food insecurity is linked to injustice and inequity, including poverty and racism.

 

One in five households in Toronto are food insecure, and for Black and Indigenous households, that number is one in three. During the pandemic, calls to 211 for emergency food services increased 600%, and we experienced our City's highest month of demand ever for food bank assistance.

 

The status of food insecurity could be even worse, if not for the long history of organizing, advocacy, and action in our city. Toronto has been at the forefront of global work on urban food policy, establishing the Toronto Food Policy Council in 1991, and with the unanimous approval of Toronto's Food Charter by City Council in 2001. The Toronto Food Strategy, led by Toronto Public Health, was established in 2010. And when the pandemic struck, emergency support programs were rapidly rolled out including opening libraries to food banks and distributing food hampers to thousands of Toronto families in partnership with the Red Cross and United Way.

 

With the benefit of a world-leading vaccination rate, we can begin to turn our attention and collective resources more fully toward learning from the pandemic, addressing its effects on our communities, and planning for a stronger, healthier, more equitable city. City staff are currently working to create the Poverty Reduction Strategy 2023-2026 Term Action Plan, which is planned to incorporate the City's food security objectives, in coordination with the Black Food Sovereignty Plan and the Reconciliation Action Plan.

 

One critical piece to add to this work plan, as identified by organizations active on food policy and the right to food, including Food Share, is to update Toronto's Food Charter, which is now more than 20 years old. A renewed charter will be the foundation and guiding document to ensure that our collective actions are coordinated toward shared goals, and a measuring stick to be certain that we are seeing through our commitments with the necessary work and accomplishments.

 

This motion requests that City of Toronto staff update Toronto's Food Charter as an integral part of the ongoing work on the Toronto Poverty Reduction Strategy 2023-2026 Term Action Plan, starting fundamentally by engaging and working with residents and community groups working actively on these issues, and those who are disproportionately affected by food insecurity, poverty and other inequities in our food system. The new version of Toronto's Food Charter should include plans for implementation, mechanisms to ensure City Council's accountability, and resourcing to put these plans into effect.

 

A lot has changed in our City since the original charter was approved in 2001. Our population is 20 percent larger, our recognition of the necessity for serious work toward anti-racism and reconciliation has deepened, we have adopted new forms of communication and community, and we are recovering from a global pandemic unprecedented in living memory. It is time for Toronto's Food Charter to reflect the Toronto of 2022, for all of us.

Background Information
(March 24, 2022) Letter from Councillor Joe Cressy, Ward 10, Spadina-Fort York on Updating Toronto's Food Charter for All
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2022/ec/bgrd/backgroundfile-223123.pdf)