Agenda

Consolidated



Community Development and Recreation Committee


Meeting No. 28   Contact Nancy Martins, Committee Administrator
Meeting Date Thursday, April 17, 2014
  Phone 416-397-4579
Start Time 9:30 AM
  E-mail cdrc@toronto.ca
Location Committee Room 1, City Hall
  Chair   Councillor Anthony Perruzza  


 Community Development and Recreation Committee

Councillor Anthony Perruzza, Chair

Councillor Joe Mihevc, Vice Chair 

Councillor Maria Augimeri

Councillor Paula Fletcher

Councillor Josh Matlow

Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam

 

Members of Council and Staff: Please keep this agenda and the accompanying material until the City Council meeting dealing with these matters has ended.

 

Special Assistance for Members of the Public: City staff can arrange for special assistance with some advance notice.  If you need special assistance, please call 416-397-4579, TTY 416-338-0889 or e-mail cdrc@toronto.ca.

 

Closed Meeting Requirements: If the Community Development and Recreation Committee wants to meet in closed session (privately), a member of the Committee must make a motion to do so and give the reason why the Committee has to meet privately (City of Toronto Act, 2006).

 

Notice to people writing or making presentations to the Community Development and Recreation Committee: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it - such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address - available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

 

The City makes a video record of committee and community council meetings. If you make a presentation to a committee or community council, the City will be video-recording you and City staff may make the video record available to the public.

 

If you want to learn more about why and how the City collects your information, write to the City Clerk's Office, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto ON M5H 2N2 or by calling 416-397-4579. 


toronto.ca/council

This agenda and any supplementary materials submitted to the City Clerk can be found online at www.toronto.ca/council. Visit the website for access to all agendas, reports, decisions and minutes of City Council and its committees. 

 

 

 

Declarations of Interest under the Municipal Conflict of Interest Act

 

Confirmation of Minutes: March 17, 2014

 

Speakers/Presentations: A complete list will be distributed at the meeting

 

Communications/Reports

CD28.1

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

2013 Year-End Report on Housing Stabilization Fund
Origin
(April 2, 2014) Report from the General Manager, Employment and Social Services
Recommendations

The General Manager of Toronto Employment and Social Services recommends that:

 

1.         City Council direct the General Manager of Toronto Employment and Social Services to re-examine Housing Stabilization Fund (HSF) funding levels through the 2015 budget process and address future funding strategies for the Housing Stabilization Fund based on two years of experience with the allocation of the fund; and

 

2.         City Council request the General Managers of Toronto Employment and Social Services and Shelter, Support and Housing Administration to include an update on the use and role of the Housing Stabilization Funds (HSF) in the report on the status of implementation of the Housing Stability Service Planning Framework that is scheduled to be provided to the Community Development and Recreation Committee in early 2015.

Summary

As part of the 2014 budget process, Council directed Toronto Employment and Social Services (TESS) to report back on the utilization and projected expenditures of the Housing Stabilization Fund (HSF), including the findings of a consultation with community agencies and an update on the number of ineligible applications, reviews requested and staff-identified funding strategies.

 

Council previously directed the use of a portion of Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative (CHPI) funding to establish the Housing Stabilization Fund (HSF), which provides assistance to Ontario Works (OW) and Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) clients in obtaining and/or retaining their housing, or relocating to more appropriate or affordable accommodation. This report provides an update on HSF spending from January to December 2013, including ineligible applications and appeals data, issues raised during the consultations conducted with stakeholders and improvements to the delivery of the HSF. It is recommended that funding levels for the HSF be re-examined through the 2015 budget process.

Financial Impact

There is no financial impact associated with this report in 2014. Funding of $27.957 million for the Housing Stabilization Fund (HSF) is provided in the 2014 Operating Budget for Toronto Employment and Social Services (TESS). TESS will carefully monitor expenditure levels throughout the year and will report back to City Council through the quarterly variance process on any major variances to budget. Future funding strategies for the HSF will be examined through the 2015 budget process.

 

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(April 2, 2014) Report and Attachments 1-4 from the General Manager, Employment and Social Services on the 2013 Year-End Report on Housing Stabilization Fund
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68220.pdf)

Communications
(April 16, 2014) E-mail from Ahmed Shoo (CD.New.CD28.1.1)
(April 17, 2014) Letter from Eric Cashmore (CD.New.CD28.1.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46890.pdf)

(April 16, 2014) Letter from Nicola Holness, Community Outreach Counsellor, Community and Legal Aid Services Programme, Adjunct Faculty, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University (CD.New.CD28.1.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46891.pdf)

(April 17, 2014) Letter from Lindsay MacPhee, Manager, Toronto Drop-In Network (CD.New.CD28.1.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46902.pdf)

(April 17, 2014) Submission from Naomi Ives Peak, Community Legal Worker and Lisa Leinveer, Law Student Caseworker (CD.New.CD28.1.5)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46903.pdf)

(April 17, 2014) Submission from Said Dirie, Housing Action Now (CD.New.CD28.1.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46897.pdf)

(April 17, 2014) Letter from Michael Blair, Co-Chair, Housing Working Group, Toronto HIV/AIDS Network (THN) and Director of Residential Programs, Fife House (CD.New.CD28.1.7)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46904.pdf)

(April 16, 2014) Letter from Nicola Holness, Social Work Division, Community and Legal Aid Services Programme, Osgoode Law School (CD.New.CD28.1.8)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46896.pdf)


CD28.2

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Feasibility of 24-Hour Drop-in Service for Women
Origin
(April 3, 2014) Report from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration
Recommendations

The General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration (SSHA), recommends that:

 

1.         City Council authorize the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to issue a Request for Expression of Interest (REOI) in 2014 to establish community interest in operating up to two 24-hour low-barrier drop-ins for women, one in the east end and one in the west end of the city; and

 

2.         City Council direct the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to prepare a report to Budget Committee during the 2015 Operating Budget process for their consideration on the results of the REOI, feasibility of the service, and estimated program costs and tax impacts.

Summary

This report provides recommendations on the feasibility of establishing a 24-hour drop-in for women, based upon consultations conducted with service users and providers from December to March 2014.

 

An update report on the need and consultation process for developing a safe overnight space for women was received by Community Development and Recreation Committee on January 21, 2014. Currently, there are very few places for women to go overnight, particularly if they will not go to shelters, or if they need respite for a short period of time.

 

A majority of those consulted agreed that there is a need for a low-threshold overnight or 24-hour service for women.  A drop-in that is open during the most dangerous times for street-involved women, when other services are closed, will meet basic safety needs and provide identified essential service needs including showers, laundry, provision of healthy food and snacks, counselling and referrals. The recent consultations indicate the service philosophy must incorporate low-barrier, harm reduction, trauma-informed care.

 

A majority suggest that a 24-hour drop-in will best meet the need for a low-barrier overnight service for women.  While a stand-alone 24-hour drop-in is the most appropriate service model to meet the needs of the most vulnerable street-involved women, enhancing a current drop-in to provide overnight services represents another viable option.

 

Regardless of the option to be pursued, however, there will be a cost impact to expanding services that will be a challenge to implement if there is a desire or expectation to keep property tax increases at or around the rate of inflation.

Financial Impact

There are no financial implications for the 2014 Operating Budget for Shelter, Support and Housing Administration resulting from the recommendations in this report.

 

The 2014 Approved Operating Budget for SSHA includes $16.406 million of funding for 196, 061 bednights of women's only shelter beds. This includes $9.644 million for 158,158 bednights in purchased shelter services and $6.762 million for 37,903 bednights in directly operated shelters. In addition, funding of $47.698 million for a combined 683,678 bednights in purchased and directly operated shelters is available to women participating in mixed use programs such as youth, co-ed and family shelters.

 

Preliminary estimates suggest that a new stand-alone 24-hour drop-in could require up to $2 million in annual funding. Expansion of an existing service could cost less than that. The costs will become clearer with the results of the proposed REOI and, subject to City Council adoption of the recommendations in this report, will be reported to Budget Committee for consideration as part of the 2015 budget process.

 

The implementation of an overnight drop-in service for women, whether through the creation of a new stand-alone 24-hour service or the expansion of an existing service to include overnight hours would represent an enhancement to existing service levels in SSHA and would add a cost pressure to the division's operating budget. It should be noted that the estimated outlook pressure for 2015 and 2016 is $125.150 million and $56.330 million respectively to maintain 2014 service levels in SSHA, primarily due to reductions in provincial and federal funding for social housing programs.

 

More importantly, the 2015 and 2016 Operating Budget Forecasts for the City estimate net budget pressures of $333 million and $204 million, respectively.  This would represent a potential residential tax increase of 14 percent and the corresponding one-third non-residential property tax increase in 2015 and 8 percent residential tax increase and the corresponding one-third non-residential property tax increase in 2016.  Given this level of funding pressures, it will be increasingly difficult and a significant challenge to implement service enhancements AND keep tax increases at the rate of inflation.

 

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(April 3, 2014) Report and Attachments 1 and 2 from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration on the Feasibility of 24-Hour Drop-in Service for Women
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68348.pdf)

(April 2, 2014) Attachment 3 - 24/7 Drop-in Service for Women: Stakeholder Consultations Executive Summary
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68392.pdf)

Communications
(April 14, 2014) Letter from Dr. Kara Santonkie, Project Director, Toronto Women's City Alliance (CD.New.CD28.2.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46877.pdf)

(April 17, 2014) Letter from Wendy Komiotis, Executive Director, METRAC (CD.New.CD28.2.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46901.pdf)

(April 16, 2014) E-mail from Eric Cashmore (CD.New.CD28.2.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46892.pdf)

(April 16, 2014) Letter from Tina Haynes, c/o Toronto Community Addiction Team (CD.New.CD28.2.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46893.pdf)

(April 17, 2014) Letter from Linsey MacPhee, Manager, Toronto Drop in Network (CD.New.CD28.2.5)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46895.pdf)

(April 17, 2014) Submission from Norma Neal, Regent Park Community Health Centre (CD.New.CD28.2.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46905.pdf)


CD28.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Contract Award - Request for Proposal No. 0513-13-7010 for the Toronto Preschool Speech and Language Program
Origin
(April 3, 2014) Report from the Medical Officer of Health and Acting Director, Purchasing and Materials Management
Recommendations

The Medical Officer of Health and the Acting Director of Purchasing and Materials Management recommend that:

 

1.         City Council, in accordance with Section 195-15 of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 195 (Purchasing By-Law), grant the Medical Officer of Health authority to negotiate and enter into service agreements in a form acceptable to the City Solicitor with the following five proponents being the highest scoring proponents per geographic service area and meeting the requirements of Request for Proposal No. 0513-13-7010, for a period of fifteen (15) months from January 1, 2015 to March 31, 2016 with the option to renew for four (4) additional one (1) year periods at the sole discretion of the Medical Officer of Health and subject to 100% Ministry of Children and Youth Services (MCYS) funding, based on the terms in the RFP for the potential costs as stated below.

 

Geographic Service Area

Proponent

Cost

West

The George Hull Centre for Children and Families

$1,107,427.00

Northwest

Macaulay Child Development Centre

$   970,724.00

Northeast

Adventure Place

$1,079,872.15

East

Aisling Discoveries Child and Family Centre

$1,060,000.00

South

The Hanen Centre

$1,145,503.00

 

2.         City Council grant the Medical Officer of Health authority to negotiate with Ministry of Children and Youth Services to secure additional funds to support transition costs, and to negotiate any necessary modifications to the terms of the service agreements to support the transition, subject to additional MCYS funding.

Summary

The purpose of this report is to obtain authority to enter into agreements with five recommended proponents based on the results of the Request for Proposal (RFP) No. 0513-13-7010, for Toronto Preschool Speech and Language Program service delivery on behalf of Toronto Public Health (TPH).

Financial Impact

There is no financial impact to the Toronto Public Health's 2014 Approved Operating Budget, as the Preschool Speech and Language (PSL) service agreements are scheduled to start on January 1, 2015.  The PSL is 100 per cent provincially-funded by MCYS. Contracts will be awarded within the funding allocation for community-based PSL services of $5.600 million gross and $0 net in ongoing operating costs and will be included for TPH's 2015 Operating Budget Submission and subsequent Operating Budget Submissions.

 

In addition, a total of $0.413 million of one-time start up costs has been identified in the proposal responses.  Recommended proponents were clearly informed in the RFP that payment for these one-time costs was not guaranteed, and would only be honoured dependent on funding from MCYS, posing no risk to the City for these costs.  Start-up costs will be negotiated with the recommended proponents accordingly.

 

 

January 2015 - March 2016

April 2016

 - March 2017 Fiscal

April 2017

 - March 2018 Fiscal

April 2018

 - March 2019 Fiscal

April 2019

 - March 2020 Fiscal

 

Annual Funding

$7.000 million

$5.600 million

$5.600 million

$5.600 million

$5.600 million

 

The Deputy City Manager and City Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(April 3, 2014) Report and Attachment 1 from the Medical Officer of Health and the Acting Director, Purchasing and Materials Management Division on the Contract Award - Request for Proposal No. 0513-13-7010 for the Toronto Preschool Speech and Language Program
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68349.pdf)


CD28.4

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Provision of Proprietary Toronto Fire Services Information and Technology Systems
Origin
(April 2, 2014) Report from the Fire Chief/General Manager and Acting Director, Purchasing and Materials Management
Recommendations

The Fire Chief and General Manager, Toronto Fire Services and the Acting Director, Purchasing and Materials Management, recommend that:

 

1.         City Council authorize the Fire Chief, to negotiate and enter into a contract with Intergraph Canada Limited for the amount of $508,800.00 net of HST, $517,754.88, net of HST recoveries, to provide for professional services and additional licences for existing Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) and Business Intelligence (BI) systems for a period of 5 years from the effective date of the agreement, on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Fire Chief, and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

 

2.         City Council authorize the Fire Chief, to negotiate and enter into a contract with Quatro Group Software Systems Inc. for the amount of $381,600.00 net of HST, $388,316.16, net of HST recoveries, to provide for professional services and additional licences for the existing Payroll/Time Entry system for a period of 5 years from the effective date of the agreement, on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Fire Chief, and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

Summary

The purpose of this report is to request authority to enter into single source contracts with Intergraph Canada Limited, who is the current vendor providing Toronto Fire Services (TFS) with the Computer Aided Dispatch System, and with Quatro Group Software Systems Inc., who is the current vendor providing the Payroll/Time Entry System, in the total amount of $890,400.00 net of HST, $906,071.04 net of HST recoveries, for a period of 5 years from the effective date of the agreements.

 

City Council approval is required in accordance with Municipal Code By-law Chapter 195- Purchasing, where the current request has exceeded the Chief Purchasing Official's authority of the cumulative five year commitment limit under Section 1 of the Purchasing By-Law and also exceeds the threshold of $500,000, net of HST, allowed under staff authority as per the Toronto Municipal Code By-law, Chapter 71 – Financial Control.

Financial Impact

Funding in the amount of $178,080.00 net of HST, $181,214.21 net of HST recoveries, is available in the 2014 Approved Operating Budget for Toronto Fire Services, and funding for the years 2015-2018 will be included in future years' Operating Budget Submissions for Toronto Fire Services. Funding details are as follows:

 

 

Cost Centres

 

Account

Jan 1, 2014

to Dec. 31, 2014

(net of HST recoveries)

Jan. 1, 2015 to Dec 31, 2015

(net of HST recoveries)

Jan. 1, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016

(net of HST recoveries)

Jan. 1, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017

(net of HST recoveries)

Jan. 1, 2018   to Dec 31, 2018

(net of HST recoveries)

Grand Total

(net of HST recoveries)

FR0014

4474

$129,438.72

$129,438.72

$129,438.72

$129,438.72

$129,438.72

$647,193.60

FR0027

4474

  $51,775.49

  $51,775.49

  $51,775.49

  $51,775.49

  $51,775.49

$258,877.44

 

 

$181,214.21

$181,214.21

$181,214.21

$181,214.21

$181,214.21

$906,071.04

 

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(April 2, 2014) Report from the Fire Chief and General Manager, Fire Services and Acting Director, Purchasing and Materials Management on the Provision of Proprietary Toronto Fire Services Information and Technology Systems
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68374.pdf)


CD28.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Toronto Fire Services Update
Origin
(April 3, 2014) Report from the Fire Chief and General Manager
Recommendations

The Fire Chief and General Manager, Toronto Fire Services, recommend that:

 

1.         The Community Development and Recreation Committee receive this report for information.

Summary

This report responds to Council's request for the Fire Chief and General Manager, Toronto Fire Services (TFS) to report to the Community Development and Recreation Committee with regards to the Master Fire Plan, an enhanced Fire Prevention and Education Program, technology improvements, the consolidation of Fire Services and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and alternatives to the 24 hour shift model.

 

Throughout 2012 and 2013, numerous studies of TFS were conducted, including an organizational and service review of TFS and Toronto Emergency Medical Services (TEMS), a review of training and recruitment by the Auditor General, and a study by the Fire Underwriters Survey (FUS). The recommendations and strategies in these studies focused on a multi-year plan (2014 to 2017) to improve service through enhanced deployment of resources, training, aggressive fire inspection and enforcement, improved fire prevention, enhanced supporting technologies and a revised Master Fire Plan.

 

In alignment with the recommendations and strategies presented in the studies and adopted by Council, TFS was requested to provide an update on the implementation status of numerous initiatives. These include the new Master Fire Plan, the development of enhanced fire prevention and public education programs, and the implementation of Dynamic Staging, Predictive Modeling, GPS-Based Dispatch and Traffic Signal Pre-Emption.  Council direction also required TFS to further evaluate the consolidation of the TFS and TEMS Communication Centres as well as to evaluate alternate staffing and deployment models with the Operations Division.

 

TFS has commenced work on the implementation of these initiatives which will ultimately lead to positive changes in the way TFS delivers all hazards response and crucial services to the public.

Financial Impact

There are no financial implications associated with this report.

 

Any financial implications associated with the implementation of the Master Fire Plan and other changes that may be implemented as highlighted in this report will be considered either through separate reporting to the Standing Committee, or considered as part of the 2015 and future-year Operating Budget processes.

 

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

 

Background Information
(April 3, 2014) Report from the Fire Chief and General Manager on Toronto Fire Services Update
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68266.pdf)


CD28.6

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Authority to Dispose of End-of-Life, Surplus Fire Fighting Equipment
Origin
(March 31, 2014) Report from the Fire Chief and General Manager
Recommendations

The Fire Chief and General Manager recommends that:

 

1.         City Council grant the Fire Chief and General Manager, Fire Services, the authority to declare personal protective equipment utilized by Toronto Fire Services as surplus to present and future divisional and corporate requirements, and to dispose of the personal protective equipment by donation where: the Fire Chief is satisfied the surplus personal protective equipment has no appreciable resale value; the personal protective equipment does not meet the applicable North American standard; the recipient is not governed by North American standards; the recipient undertakes to bear all costs and liabilities associated with the donation, and executes indemnity and waiver agreements with the City, such agreements to be in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor; and

 

2.         City Council authorize the Fire Chief and General Manager, Fire Services to execute indemnity and waiver agreements with the appropriate officials receiving the donated items, on behalf of the City, such agreements to be in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

Summary

This report seeks City Council approval to authorize the Fire Chief to dispose of, through donation, end-of-life, surplus firefighting equipment, which no longer meets the guidelines applicable to Toronto Fire Services operations. This surplus inventory consists of bunker suits, helmets and fire fighting boots, and has no residual value in North America.

 

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Guideline 1851 regulates the lifecycle of the Toronto Fire Services' personal protective equipment, such as bunker suits, helmets and fire fighting boots. Under NFPA Guideline 1851, the Toronto Fire Services like all other fire services which follow NFPA guidelines, are required to retire personal protective equipment from service no more than ten years from the date of manufacture.

 

The surplus inventory of personal protective equipment has no residual value in North America.  However, the City often receives requests from non-profit groups, agencies or municipal officials in other jurisdictions not subject to NFPA Guideline 1851 for donations of surplus personal protective equipment. Many fire services in developing countries have trained staff, but may have very limited resources to provide personal protective equipment to fire fighters.

 

The City of Toronto will not be responsible for any costs associated with any donation of used or end-of-life firefighting equipment. Recipients of these donations will be responsible for all costs and liabilities associated with the donation and transporting of the items.

Financial Impact

There are no financial implications associated with the approval of this report.  All costs and liabilities associated with the donation of any end-of-life equipment will be borne by the recipient of the donated gear. The donated equipment has no residual value in North America.

 

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(March 31, 2014) Report from the Fire Chief and General Manager on the Authority to Dispose of End-of-Life, Surplus Fire Fighting Equipment
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68211.pdf)

Communications
(April 17, 2014) Letter from Mayor of Municipality of Plovdiv and Governor of Plovkiv District, Bulgaria addressed to the Mayor, City Manager and Fire Chief, submitted by Richard Majkot, Executive Director of COTAPSA (CD.New.CD28.6.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46894.pdf)


CD28.7

Information 

 

 

Ward: All 

After-School Pool Use in Toronto District School Board (TDSB) Pools
Origin
(March 31, 2014) Report from the Acting General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation
Summary

This report responds to City Council's direction from its meeting of July 16, 2013 to report back to the Community Development and Recreation Committee regarding the expanded use of school pools during the 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. "after-school" period by Parks, Forestry and Recreation.

 

The Agreement between the City of Toronto (The City) and the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) For Use of School Pools was approved by Council at its meeting of May 8 and 9, 2012. The Agreement outlines the designated hours of exclusive use by each party, as well as the financial commitments required from the City to access 33 TDSB pools for the purpose of delivering Parks, Forestry and Recreation (PFR) programs to the public. In 2013, the City's financial commitment under the terms of the agreement was $5.96M. Although the Agreement does not include a formal process to request additional times should the pool be available, in 2013 the City was able to informally negotiate access to pools between 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. in 26 of the 33 TDSB pools included in the Agreement.

Financial Impact

This report is for information purposes only and has no direct financial impact. There are no additional TDSB rental costs to the City for the use of pools between 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. Further, there would be no net financial impact as a result of running instructional programs during these times, as instructional programs are run on a cost recovery basis.

 

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(March 31, 2014) Report from the Acting General Manager: Parks, Forestry and Recreation on After-School Pool Use in TDSB Pools
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68213.pdf)

(March 31, 2014) Appendix A - TDSB School Pool Locations
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68214.pdf)


CD28.8

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 2, 7, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19, 38 

Etobicoke Olympium Anchor Sport Clubs: Hardship and Loss from Toronto 2015 Upgrade Closure
Origin
(April 1, 2014) Report from the Acting General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation
Recommendations

The General Manager of Parks, Forestry and Recreation and the Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer recommend that:

 

1.         City Council authorize the General Manager of Parks, Forestry and Recreation to provide $0.181 million dollars in permit credits at the Etobicoke Olympium as follows  for the Etobicoke Diving Club, Etobicoke Swimming, and the Olympium Synchronized Swimming Club.

 

Anchor Club

2014 Credit

2015 Credit

Etobicoke Diving Club

$38,500

$38,500

Olympium Synchronized Swim Club

$22,000

$22,000

Etobicoke Swimming

$30,000

$30,000

Annual Total

$90,500

$90,500

Table 1 - Permit Credit Annual Distribution

Summary

This report responds to separate and unsolicited requests from three anchor sport clubs operating out of the Etobicoke Olympium (EO), requesting relief for losses incurred as a result of the year-long closure for Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games facility upgrades.

 

To prepare the Etobicoke Olympium as a practice facility for the 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games, numerous renovations and upgrades are underway. Full closure of the facility was required to allow for the work to be completed. The upgrades and renovations at the site include a new competition pool; an upgraded dive tower; improved mechanical and electrical systems; and a redesigned and renovated lobby. The Etobicoke Olympium closed in July of 2013 and is scheduled to re-open in the summer of 2014.

 

The temporary closure of the Etobicoke Olympium as a training facility had a detrimental impact on the EO anchor clubs leading into the most critical training season for the 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games themselves. The Etobicoke Diving Club, Etobicoke Swimming, and the Olympium Synchronized Swimming Club have demonstrated hardship including loss of members, loss of fundraising opportunities and difficulty in securing adequate training facilities within reasonable proximity to the Etobicoke Olympium. The hardship faced by the clubs as a result of the EO closure has had significant impact on the Clubs' operations for the year and will extend into the future.

 

This report was informed by consultations with respective board representatives from each of the anchor clubs, as well as a review of financial and membership data submitted by each club. Representatives from the anchor clubs are in agreement with the recommendation in this report.

Financial Impact

In 2013, Parks, Forestry and Recreation realised savings from staffing costs and utilities related to the closure of the Etobicoke Olympium. As the facility remains closed for six months in 2014, further savings are anticipated in the 2014 operating budget. In 2014, the allocation of permit credits will be partially offset by an estimated savings of $46,600 with a net impact of $43,900 to be absorbed within the Parks, Forestry and Recreation budget.

 

The net financial impact of $90,500 in 2015 will be submitted for consideration as part of the 2015 operating budget process.

 

($000's)

2014 Impact

2015 Impact

Total

Net Expenditure Savings

46.6

0.0

46.6

Proposed Credits

90.5

90.5

181.0

Net Expenditure Impact

43.9

90.5

134.4

Table 2 - Financial Impact Summary

 

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer has reviewed this report and agrees with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(April 1, 2014) Report from the Acting General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation on the Etobicoke Olympium Anchor Sport Clubs: Hardship and Loss from Toronto 2015 Upgrade Closure
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68212.pdf)


CD28.9

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: All 

Toronto Newcomer Strategy, 2014 - 2016 Implementation
Origin
(April 2, 2014) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration
Recommendations

The Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration recommends that:

 

1.         City Council adopt the Integrating Cities Charter (Attachment 2) and direct that Toronto become a signatory of the Charter;

 

2.         City Council declare the day of the signing ceremony as Newcomer Day in Toronto;

 

3.         City Council approve the implementation of the new activities outlined in this report, including an anti-rumour campaign in Toronto and annual Newcomer Fair; and

 

4.         City Council direct the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration to continue monitoring the implementation of the Toronto Newcomer Strategy and providing annual progress reports to the Community Development and Recreation Committee.

 

Summary

Toronto City Council approved the mission, vision and guiding principles of the Toronto Newcomer Strategy, and set policy direction concerning a number of other immigration related issues in 2013. The release of the Strategy has brought the successful integration of newcomers into focus.  Its vision is that "all newcomers reach their full potential to thrive and contribute to their local neighbourhood, community and city, ensuring Toronto’s continued success and prosperity."

 

This report provides information and progress updates on a number of City Council decisions, including those related to the implementation of the Toronto Newcomer Strategy, Social Development Open Dialogue Sessions, Integrating Cities Charter, municipal franchise, welfare of immigrant children and access to City services for newcomers.

 

The report highlights major achievements to date, relevant trends and issues, and outlines recommendations for new activities.

Financial Impact

The Toronto Newcomer Office is fully funded by a federal grant with a term of April through March. As Social Development, Finance and Administration (SDFA) has recently received notice of the extension of the federal funding through 2016, the program will be reporting the availability of an additional $285 thousand for 2014 programming and funding through an in-year adjustment in the 1'st quarter operating variance report.

 

Once this adjustment has been approved by Council, the 2014 Operating Budget for SDFA will include the full-year programming and funding, adjusting the 2014 Approved Operating Budget for SDFA to include $386 thousand gross and $0 net to deliver the Toronto Newcomer Strategy.

Background Information
(April 2, 2014) Report and Attachments 1-3 from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration on the Toronto Newcomer Strategy, 2014 - 2016 Implementation
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68223.pdf)

Communications
(April 1, 2014) Letter from Tim Maguire, President, CUPE Local 79 and Sean Meager, President, Public Interest (CD.New.CD28.9.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/comm/communicationfile-46879.pdf)


CD28.10

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 28 

Regent Park Legacy Funds
Origin
(April 3, 2014) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration
Recommendations

The Executive Director of Social Development, Finance and Administration recommends that:

 

1.         City Council authorize the creation of a trust fund called the Regent Park Legacy Trust Fund to support community development, capacity building in the community and sponsor special events.

 

2.         The funds held in the Regent Park Residents' Association Reserve Fund ( XR3013) be transferred to the new Regent Park Legacy Trust Fund and that the Regent Park Residents' Reserve Fund be closed and deleted from Municipal Code Chapter 227.  City Council authorize the Executive Director of SDFA to receive $408,390.56 from Toronto Community Housing Corporation as a contribution to the new Regent Park Legacy Fund Trust.

 

3.         City Council direct the Executive Director of Social Development, Finance and Administration to work with appropriate staff at Toronto Community Housing Corporation to develop a Request for Proposal to select an organization to manage an annual grant from the Regent Park Legacy Fund Trust.

 

4.         City Council authorize Executive Director of Social Development, Finance and Administration to release the interest from the Trust on an annual basis through the Social Development, Finance and Administration operating budget to a third party organization as a grant for purposes consistent with the objects of the Trust.

 

5.         Council authority be required should the Regent Park Community Reference Group wish to access any of the principle for disbursement.

 

6.         Staff be authorized to introduce any necessary bills in Council.

Summary

This report explains the history of the Legacy Funds (officially known as the Regent Park Resident's Association (Reserve Fund XR3013)), and current opportunity to use these funds in a manner that will continue to build community capacity.

 

During the early 1980's, Regent Park residents had a vision for a community centre run by residents. To support this vision, Ontario Housing Corporation (OHC) households voluntarily committed $2 per month for three years, totalling $10,000. As well, the City of Toronto, Metro Toronto and Ontario Housing Corporation (now Toronto Community Housing Corporation – TCHC) provided an additional $160,000 of funding (Legacy Funds). Interest earned on these funds has continued to accumulate over the years.

 

The South Regent Community Centre was built a decade later by the federal and provincial governments, and the original funds donated remained with the City of Toronto and TCHC. While Council is under no obligation to release these funds, it is recommended that these funds be used to benefit the Regent Park community.   The community would like to repurpose the funds held by the City and TCHC, given that the original purpose has been fulfilled in another way.  The funds should remain in Regent Park and their use should honour the intent of the original funds because funds were garnered as a result of fundraising efforts by local residents.

 

Over the past year, the City and TCHC have worked closely with the Regent Park Community Reference Group (RPCRG), a group of local residents, to undertake a community engagement process to determine how the Legacy Funds can support the newly revitalized Regent Park community in a manner that honours the original spirit of the fund.

 

This report seeks Council direction to create the Regent Park Legacy Funds Trust, and to release the interest generated annually to a third party organization to manage a community grant specifically for the Regent Park community. TCHC has agreed to release the Legacy Funds it is holding for this purpose.

Financial Impact

As noted in the following table, there is currently $296,400 in the Regent Park Residents' Association Reserve Fund.  Funds available from TCHC total $408,390, which combined with the City funds in XR3103, comprise a total of $704,790 for investment.

 

Source of Funds

City of Toronto

TCHC

Total

Principle ($)

50,000

80,000

130,000

Accumulated Interest ($)

246,400

328,390

574,790

TOTAL

296,400

408,390

704,790

 

The Deputy City Manager and Chief Financial Officer have reviewed this report and agree with the financial impact information.

Background Information
(April 3, 2014) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration on Regent Park Legacy Funds
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68344.pdf)

Communications
(April 15, 2014) E-mail from Dianne MacLean (CD.New.CD28.10.1)

CD28.11

ACTION 

 

 

Ward: 30 

City Support for the Red Door Shelter
Origin
(April 10, 2014) Letter from Councillor Paula Fletcher
Recommendations

Councillor Paula Fletcher recommends to the Community Development and Recreation Committee that:

 

1)         City Council support the Red Door Shelter in its efforts should it seek to establish its new home within any development of the property; relocate to a new property on Queen Street East; or undertake to establish a title claim to the property

 

2)         The City Manager and Deputy City Managers explore all mechanisms, including financial options, which can be used to maintain the continuity of the services provided by the Red Door Shelter on Queen Street East

 

3)         Assist the Red Door Shelter in finding a temporary location should the redevelopment include the shelter at 875 Queen Street East

Summary

The Red Door Shelter has been providing support to families in need of emergency shelter for over 30 years. Due to a real estate deal gone wrong the shelter is now in danger of losing its home. The property has been put into receivership with a mandate to be sold, with no provisions in place to guarantee the shelter is maintained within any new development.

 

Family shelters provide critical services to women and children fleeing abuse, to refugees in need of assistance, and to families fallen on hard times. The Red Door Shelter is very important to the City of Toronto's family shelter network, and its 106 beds are much needed. Deputy City Manager Brenda Patterson has been very helpful in working with the shelter to provide assistance in trying to resolve this issue, and the City has shown great commitment to this stellar service provider in our community.

 

On April 7th, over 300 residents gathered at an emergency meeting in support of the Red Door Shelter, voicing full support for keeping the shelter in its home. Many communities fight against shelters in their neighbourhoods, and I am so proud of my community for rallying to keep the shelter in their backyard. Everyone feels the Red Door is an important part of our community and over 16,000 people have signed a petition in support of the shelter.

 

Former Mayor David Crombie attended the emergency meeting and heard from residents how important this shelter is to them. Mr. Crombie has volunteered his services to work with all parties to come to a positive resolution that keeps the shelter at this site.

 

The community asked me to express their strong desire for City to continue to assist the Red Door in any way possible, including with financial assistance.

Background Information
(April 10, 2014) Letter from Councillor Paula Fletcher, Ward 30, Toronto-Danforth on the City Support for the Red Door Shelter
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2014/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-68536.pdf)