Agenda

Consolidated



City Council


Meeting No. 35   Contact Marilyn Toft, Manager
Meeting Date Tuesday, December 5, 2017
Wednesday, December 6, 2017
Thursday, December 7, 2017
Friday, December 8, 2017
  Phone 416-392-7032
Start Time 9:30 AM
  E-mail clerk@toronto.ca
Location Council Chamber, City Hall
     


The Agenda and related materials for this meeting are enclosed. The details of the meeting are noted at the top of the Agenda.

 

Members of Council and Staff: Please keep this agenda and the accompanying material until the City Council meeting dealing with these matters has ended. The City Clerk’s Office will not provide additional copies.

 

Notice to People Writing to Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees.

 

The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it – such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address – available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

 

The City video records Council, committee and community council meetings. If you make a presentation to a committee or community council, the City will be video recording you and City staff may make the video recordings available to the public. If you want to learn more about why and how the City collects your information, write to the City Clerk's Office, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto ON M5H 2N2 or call 416-392-7032.

 

Closed Meeting Requirements: If Council wants to meet in closed session (privately), a member of Council must make a motion to do so and give the reason why Council has to meet privately (City of Toronto Act, 2006).

 

November 30, 2017


toronto.ca/council

This agenda and any supplementary materials submitted to the City Clerk can be found online at www.toronto.ca/council. Visit the website for access to all agendas, reports, decisions and minutes of City Council and its committees.

Routine Matters - Meeting 35
RM35.1

Presentation 

 

 

Ward:All 

Call to Order
City Council voted to recess at 6:00pm on Tuesday, December 5.

Council will consider the Mayor's Key Matter, EX29.1 - Smart Track Project Update and Next Steps, as the first item of business.

Council will consider the Mayor's Key Matter, EX29.2 - Rail Deck Park – Results of Feasibility Analysis and Next Steps for Implementation, as the second item of business.

Council voted to consider EX29.10 - Enhanced Security Measures at Toronto City Hall, as the first item of business after the Mayor’s Key Matters;

Council voted to consider the following items on Wednesday, December 6:
  1. CD24.7 - 2018 Shelter Infrastructure Plan and Progress Report
  2. AU10.7 - 2018 Audit Work Plan
  3. GM23.16 - Expropriation of 1269 Danforth Road, Scarborough Subway Extension
  4. EX29.36 - Establishment of an Indigenous Affairs Office at the City of Toronto, as the first item after the lunch recess

Council voted to consider the following items on Thursday, December 7:
  1. LS23.1 - Licensing and Registration Regulations for Short-Term Rentals, and PG24.8 - Zoning By-law and Zoning By-law Amendments to Permit Short-term Rentals
  2. EX29.18 - 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Water and 2018 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees
  3. EX29.19 - 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2018 Solid Waste Rates and Fees
  4. EX29.20 - 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Parking Authority
  5. MM35.42 - Purchase of 915 and 945 Lake Shore Boulevard East (Showline Studios) by the Toronto Port Lands Company and Sale of 675 Commissioners Street by the Toronto Port Lands Company

Council voted to consider the following items on Friday, December 8:
  1. EX29.10 - Enhanced Security Measures at Toronto City Hall
  2. EX29.19 - 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2018 Solid Waste Rates and Fees
  3. PG24.6 - Port Lands Planning Initiatives - Final Report

Summary

- O Canada
- Moment of Silence
- Declarations of Interest under the Municipal Conflict of Interest Act

Background Information
Condolence Motion for The Honourable Tobias C. Enverga, Jr.
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/rm/bgrd/backgroundfile-109771.pdf)

Condolence Motion for Maureen Prinsloo
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/rm/bgrd/backgroundfile-109772.pdf)


RM35.2

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Confirmation of Minutes
Summary

City Council will confirm the Minutes from the regular meeting on November 7, 8 and 9, 2017.


RM35.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Introduction of Committee Reports, New Business and Business Previously Requested from City Officials
Summary

Deferred Items:

Audit Committee Item AU10.7

Community Development and Recreation Committee Item CD23.10

Planning and Growth Management Committee Item PG23.9

Public Works and Infrastructure Committee Item PW24.3

Public Works and Infrastructure Committee Item PW24.4

Public Works and Infrastructure Committee Item PW24.5

Striking Committee Item ST14.5

Striking Committee Item ST14.11

Toronto and East York Community Council Item TE27.46

 

Report of the Executive Committee from Meeting 29 on November 28, 2017

Submitted by Mayor John Tory, Chair

 

Report of the Board of Health from Meeting 22 on October 30, 2017

Submitted by Councillor Joe Mihevc, Chair

 

Report of the Community Development and Recreation Committee from Meeting 24 on November 20, 2017

Submitted by Councillor James Pasternak, Chair

 

Report of the Economic Development Committee from Meeting 25 on November 17, 2017

Submitted by Councillor Michael Thompson, Chair

 

Report of the Government Management Committee from Meeting 23 on November 13, 2017

Submitted by Councillor Paul Ainslie, Chair

 

Report of the Licensing and Standards Committee from Meeting 23 on November 16, 2017

Submitted by Councillor Cesar Palacio, Chair

 

Report of the Parks and Environment Committee from Meeting 23 on November 17, 2017

Submitted by Councillor Mary-Margaret McMahon, Chair

 

Report of the Planning and Growth Management Committee from Meeting 24 on November 15, 2017

Submitted by Councillor David Shiner, Chair

 

Report of the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee from Meeting 25 on November 29, 2017

Submitted by Councillor Jaye Robinson, Chair

 

Report of the Etobicoke York Community Council from Meeting 26 on November 14, 2017

Submitted by Councillor Mark Grimes, Chair

 

Report of the North York Community Council from Meeting 26 on November 14, 2017

Submitted by Councillor Maria Augimeri, Chair

 

Report of the Scarborough Community Council from Meeting 26 on November 14, 2017

Submitted by Councillor Michelle Holland, Chair

 

Report of the Toronto and East York Community Council from Meeting 28 on November 14, 2017

Submitted by Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, Chair

 

New Business and Business Previously Requested submitted by City Officials

 


RM35.4

Information 

 

 

Ward:All 

Petitions
Summary

Members of Council may file petitions.


RM35.5

Presentation 

 

 

Ward:All 

Presentations, Introductions and Announcements
Summary

Various presentations and announcements will be made at the City Council meeting.


RM35.6

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Review of the Order Paper
Summary

City Council will review the Order Paper.

Background Information
Order Paper December 5, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/rm/bgrd/backgroundfile-109913.pdf)

Order Paper December 6, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/rm/bgrd/backgroundfile-109893.pdf)

Order Paper December 7, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/rm/bgrd/backgroundfile-109894.pdf)

Order Paper December 8, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/rm/bgrd/backgroundfile-109895.pdf)


Administrative Inquiry and Answer - Meeting 35
IA35.1

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Cost of Preventing Information Being Released at Toronto Hydro
The City Manager has submitted an answer to this Inquiry (IA35.1a).

Under Council's Procedures, City Council can receive or refer an Administrative Inquiry, without debate.
Summary

 Councillor Gord Perks has submitted the following Administrative Inquiry:

 

"I wish to file an administrative inquiry into the cost of preventing information being released at Toronto Hydro.

 

The Toronto Star has reported that it has filed freedom of information inquiries related to privatization consultants and to the hiring of two former members of Mayor Tory's campaign staff. I wish to know how much money has been spent on legal fees to prevent the information from being released.

 

I look forward to your timely response at the next meeting of City Council."

Background Information
(November 22, 2017) Administrative Inquiry from Councillor Gord Perks, Ward 14, Parkdale-High Park into the Cost of Preventing Information being Released at Toronto Hydro (IA35.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ia/bgrd/backgroundfile-109363.pdf)

(December 4, 2017) Answer from the City Manager (IA35.1a)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ia/bgrd/backgroundfile-109756.pdf)


Deferred Items - Meeting 35
(Deferred by City Council from November 7, 2017 - 2017.AU10.7)
AU10.7

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

2018 Audit Work Plan
Second Item on Wednesday, December 6th

Requires 30 votes to amend the Auditor General's work plan.

Communications AU10.7.1 to AU10.7.3 have been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Audit Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council receive the Auditor General’s 2018 Audit Work Plan, attached to the report (October 12, 2017) from the Auditor General.

Origin
(October 12, 2017) Report from the Auditor General
Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide City Council with an overview of the work the Auditor General plans to conduct in 2018.

 

The Auditor General’s annual Audit Work Plan is based on projects identified from the latest risk assessment, as well as consultations with City Councillors and City management.

 

In response to the Council approved increase of $1.0 million to the Auditor General's 2017 Operating Budget, five new audits were added to the 2017 Audit Work Plan. Additional audits have been planned for 2018 in anticipation of a further funding increase of $1.5 million in 2018. These audits are described in Attachment 1. Planning activities for some of the audits on the 2018 Audit Work Plan will start as early as November 2017.

 

With the additional funding, the Auditor General can now address the high priority projects on a timelier basis by including more projects in her annual Audit Work Plan. This will result in a gradual decline of backlogged projects that have been constrained by prior years’ operating budgets.

 

The Auditor General’s Forensic Unit will also be undertaking more major investigations with the additional resources. Further, the Auditor General intends to continue with her focus on critical information technology risks across the City and its agencies and corporations. The Office will expand the use of data analytics in applicable audits and transition high-risk areas identified to its Continuous Controls Monitoring Program to provide ongoing reporting to management and City Council.

 

The additional funding will enable the Auditor General to acquire services of specialists on audits and investigations where subject matter expertise is required.

 

According to Chapter 3 of the Municipal Code, City Council may add to the annual audit plan by a two-thirds vote of all Council members. The Auditor General may amend the Audit Work Plan if new priorities arise.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 12, 2017) Report from the Auditor General - 2018 Audit Work Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/au/bgrd/backgroundfile-107812.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Auditor General's Office - 2018 Audit Work Plan; Attachment 2 - Audit and Investigation Reports Issued from 2013 to 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/au/bgrd/backgroundfile-107813.pdf)

Speakers

Councillor Glenn De Baeremaeker

Communications (City Council)
(December 2, 2017) E-mail from Hamish Wilson (CC.Supp.AU10.7.1)
(December 4, 2017) E-mail from Faiza Waheed (CC.Supp.AU10.7.2)
(December 4, 2017) E-mail from Rose Kudlac (CC.New.AU10.7.3)
(December 5, 2017) Petition from Councillor Paul Ainslie, Ward 43, Scarborough East, regarding a value-for-money analysis of the Scarborough Subway Extension, containing the names and signatures of approximately 375 persons, filed during the Routine Matters portion of the meeting (CC.New)

(Deferred by City Council from November 7, 2017 - 2017.CD23.10)
CD23.10

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Review and Identification of Resources for Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy 2020
Committee Recommendations

The Community Development and Recreation Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration to enter into a development and construction agreement with the Thorncliffe Park Neighbourhood Office for the construction of community space in the Thorncliffe Park Hub at the East York Town Centre Mall, which agreement shall have terms and conditions acceptable to the Deputy City Manager, Internal Services and be in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

 

2.  City Council direct the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration to develop Neighbourhood Action Plans for all wards and neighbourhoods:

 

a.  noting that the clear priority will be the Neighbourhood Action Plans developed by staff; and

 

b.  searching for and identifying opportunities to strengthen capacity and resilience, and to manage growth.

 

3.  City Council request the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration to report to the Budget Committee on the resources necessary to undertake this work in 2018.

Origin
(October 6, 2017) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration
Summary

At its meeting of March 28 and 29, 2017, City Council approved the staff report: Activating People, Resources and Policies: Progress on Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy (TSNS) 2020 and requested the Executive Director of Social Development, Finance and Administration (SDFA) to report on recommendations for the resourcing of the TSNS 2020 prior to the 2018 budget process.

 

This report outlines the additional resources required to fully implement the TSNS 2020 strategy, summarizes the City resources that have been allocated to Neighbourhood Improvement Areas (NIAs), identifies neighbourhood planning tables that have economic opportunities as a priority and provides an update on reinvigorating the Emerging Neighbourhoods strategy, including funding opportunities.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 6, 2017) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration on Review and Identification of Resources for Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy 2020
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-107703.pdf)

Revised Appendix 1 - Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy 2020: Neighbourhood Action Plans
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-108051.pdf)

Speakers

Alex Dow, Director, Neighbourhood Initiatives, United Way Toronto and York Region
Councillor Janet Davis

Communications (Committee)
(October 20, 2017) Submission from Canadian Union of Public Employees CUPE Local 79 (CD.New.CD23.10.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/comm/communicationfile-73134.pdf)


(Deferred by City Council from November 7, 2017 - 2017.PG23.9)
PG23.9

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Toronto Green Standard Review and Update
Committee Recommendations

The Planning and Growth Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council amend the Toronto Green Standard Version 3 to:

 

a.  require all non-residential building types to provide diversion space

b.  require developers to file a construction and demolition waste recycling plan with the city on the same basis as is required by the Province.

 

2.  City Council adopt the Toronto Green Standard Version 3 performance measures as shown in Attachment 2:  Mid to High-Rise Residential and All Non-Residential to the report (September 28, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, as amended by Recommendation 1 above, to be applied to new development applications under the Planning Act commencing May 1, 2018. 

 

3.  City Council adopt the Toronto Green Standard Version 3 performance measures as shown in Attachment 3: Low-Rise Residential to the report (September 28, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, to be applied to new development applications under the Planning Act commencing May 1, 2018. 

 

4.  City Council adopt the Toronto Green Standard Version 3 performance measures as shown in Attachment 4: City Agency, Corporation and Division-Owned Facilities (Non-Residential Uses) to the report (September 28, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, as amended by Recommendation 1 above, to be applied to new development applications under the Planning Act commencing May 1, 2018. 

 

5.  City Council direct the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning to explore additional financial and non-financial incentives to encourage developers to meet Tier 2 of the Toronto Green Standard Version 3 and report back to the Planning and Growth Management Committee before the end of the second quarter of 2018.

 

6.  City Council request Build Toronto and the Toronto Realty Agency to consider the application of, at minimum, Tier 2 of the Toronto Green Standard Version 3 standards as part of their development agreements with future owners of land.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Planning and Growth Management Committee considered Items PG23.9 and PG23.10 together.

 

The Acting Project Manager, Environmental Planning, Strategic Initiatives, Policy and Analysis, City Planning and the Deputy Chief Building Official and Director, North York District, Toronto Building gave a presentation on Pathway to a Low Carbon Future.

Origin
(September 28, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning
Summary

This report presents the updated Toronto Green Standard Version 3 which proposes a four-tiered framework for development to achieve near-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 in support of Council's adoption of TransformTO and goal to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent of 1990 levels by 2050.

 

The Toronto Green Standard is a set of environmental performance measures that facilitate sustainable new development in Toronto and is a key component of the City's commitment to the achievement of a healthy and prosperous City. The Toronto Green Standard plays a critical role in transforming and influencing the market and provincial regulation by consistently raising the bar for performance. It has been responsible for developing capacity amongst developers and demonstrating that the industry can and will build higher performance buildings.

 

The Toronto Green Standard Version 3 is proposed to come into effect on May 1, 2018. Key changes include:

 

- new requirements for Tier 1 including an option to use absolute performance targets for energy;

- new core measures for Tier 2 including using absolute performance targets for energy, solar readiness, connection to district energy, stormwater retention and a resilience checklist;

- new Tier 3 performance measures;

- new Tier 4 absolute performance targets for energy; and

- a separate standard for City agency, corporation and division-owned non-residential developments.
 

The recommended revised and updated Toronto Green Standard reflects consultation with a number of stakeholders. An Advisory Committee and a workshop with energy modellers provided advice with respect to the development of the Zero Emissions Buildings Framework. Industry stakeholders, including the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD), provided valuable input into the preparation of the Toronto Green Standard Version 3 through workshops and meetings. The Toronto

 

Green Standard Version 3 reflects the updated environmental policies of the Official Plan, incorporates improvements resulting from direct experiences in applying the Toronto Green Standard and reflects new and updated City guidelines, policies and regulations.

 

This report was prepared in consultation with Toronto Building, Environment and Energy, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, Toronto Water, Transportation Services, Solid Waste, Legal Services and Corporate Finance Divisions as well as the Chief Resilience Officer..

Background Information (Committee)
(September 28, 2017) Report and Attachment 1 from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on Toronto Green Standard Review and Update
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107359.pdf)

Attachment 2: Toronto Green Standard v3- Sustainability Requirements for New Development in Toronto: Mid to High-Rise Residential and All Non-Residential
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107487.pdf)

Attachment 3: Toronto Green Standard v3- Sustainability Requirements for New Development in Toronto: Low-Rise Residential
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107488.pdf)

Attachment 4: Toronto Green Standard v3- Sustainability Requirements for New Development in Toronto: City Agency, Corporation and Division-Owned Facilities (Non-Residential Uses)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107489.pdf)

Presentation on Pathway to a Low Carbon Future
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107789.pdf)

Speakers

Bryan Purcell, The Atmospheric Fund
Gabriella Kalapos, Clean Air Partnership and Chair of the Clean Air Council
Emily J. Alfred, Waste Campaigner, Toronto Environmental Alliance
Sheena Sharpe, Councillor, Ontario Association of Architects

Communications (Committee)
(October 6, 2017) Letter from Andy Schonberger, Chair, Leadership Board, The Greater Toronto Chapter of the Canada Green Building Council (PG.New.PG23.9.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72581.pdf)

(October 10, 2017) Letter from Janet Rosenberg, Janet Rosenberg & Studio (PG.New.PG23.9.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72633.pdf)

(October 10, 2017) Letter from Andrew Bowerbank, Global Director, Sustainable Building Services, EllisDon  (PG.New.PG23.9.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72634.pdf)

(October 10, 2017) Letter from John Stephenson, Architect, President, Ontario Association of Architects (PG.New.PG23.9.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72635.pdf)

(October 10, 2017) E-mail from Mike Williams, Principal, Sustainability RWDI (PG.New.PW23.9.5)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72636.pdf)

(October 10, 2017) Letter from Andrew Peel, President, OntarioPH  (PG.New.PG23.9.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72637.pdf)

(October 11, 2017) Letter from Danielle Chin, Senior Manager, Policy & Government Relations, Building Industry and Land Development Association (PG.New.PG23.9.7)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72638.pdf)

(October 11, 2017) E-mail from Marianne Touchie, Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering and Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto (PG.New.PG23.9.8)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72614.pdf)

(October 11, 2017) Letter from Agnieszka Wloch, Vice President, Development, Minto Communities -Canada (PG.New.PG23.9.9)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72615.pdf)

(October 11, 2017) E-mail from Hamish Wilson (PG.New.PG23.9.10)
(October 11, 2017) Letter from Bryan Purcell, Director of Policy and Programs, Toronto Atmospheric Fund (PG.New.PG23.9.11)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72646.pdf)

(October 11, 2017) Letter from Keith Brooks, Programs Director, Environmental Defence (PG.New.PG23.9.12)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72647.pdf)

(October 11, 2017) E-mail from David Lewis (PG.New.PG23.9.13)
(October 11, 2017) E-mail from Brigit Siber (PG.New.PG23.9.14)
(October 11, 2017) Letter from Michael Black, Walk Toronto Steering Committee (PG.New.PG23.9.15)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72682.pdf)

(October 10, 2017) Letter from Michael Singleton, Executive Director, Sustainable Building Canada (PG.New.PG23.9.16)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72683.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(November 1, 2017) Letter from Mike Williams (CC.Supp.PG23.9.17)
(October 10, 2017) Letter from John Stephenson, Architect, Ontario Association of Architects (CC.Supp.PG23.9.18)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74004.pdf)

(October 31, 2017) Letter from Doris Chee, President, Ontario Association of Landscape Architects (CC.Supp.PG23.9.19)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74005.pdf)

(November 3, 2017) E-mail from Michael Mesure, Executive Director, Fatal Light Awareness Program (FLAP) Canada (CC.Supp.PG23.9.20)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74003.pdf)


(Deferred by City Council from November 7, 2017 - 2017.PW24.3)
PW24.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Utility Locate Services for Business Improvement Areas as Required by the Ontario Underground Infrastructure Notification Act (ON1Call)
Communications PW24.3.1 and PW24.3.2 have been submitted on this Item.
Confidential Attachment - The receiving of advice that is subject to solicitor-client privilege
Committee Recommendations

The Public Works and Infrastructure Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct that the City of Toronto assume ownership of BIA underground infrastructure assets and include BIA locate services to be managed and administered by the General Manager, Transportation Services, as of February 1, 2018, or such earlier or later date(s) as the General Manager of Transportation Services considers appropriate in the circumstances, and that the BIAs continue to maintain the infrastructure.

 

2.  City Council direct the General Manager, Transportation Services to administer BIA utility locate services on a cost-sharing basis, charging back the BIAs 50 percent of the actual costs attributed to each BIA on an annual basis and setting a provision for the City share as part of the 2018 budget process.

 

3.  City Council direct that, effective as of the date the City assumes ownership of BIA underground infrastructure, Municipal Code Chapter 19, Business Improvement Areas, be amended to include a new section 5.6 to allow the City to impose a special charge on any unpaid amounts owing to the City, and to include a new Article 7 deeming the City to be the owner of the underground infrastructure and requiring the BIAs to maintain the infrastructure, as set out in Appendix 1 to the report (October 16, 2017) from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, the General Manager, Transportation Services and the City Solicitor, subject to any necessary minor substantive or stylistic refinements as may be identified by the General Manager of Economic Development and Culture or the City Solicitor.

 

4. City Council direct that the confidential information contained in Confidential Attachment 1 to the report (October 16, 2017) from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, the General Manager, Transportation Services and the City Solicitor remain confidential in its entirety, as it contains advice which is subject to solicitor-client privilege.

Origin
(October 16, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, the General Manager, Transportation Services and the City Solicitor
Summary

The purpose of this report is to recommend that the City assume ownership of all underground infrastructure assets owned by the Business Improvement Area (the "BIAs") boards of management and assume responsibility for BIA utility locate services through the City's existing service contract, as of February 1, 2018 or such earlier or later date(s) as may be determined by the General Manager of Transportation Services.  This would facilitate compliance with Ontario Underground Infrastructure Notification Act, 2012 (the "Act") and safe and timely responses to utility locate requests.  The City would perform this work on behalf of the BIAs on a cost-sharing basis, charging back the BIAs 50 percent of the actual costs attributed to their BIA.  It is estimated that the total additional costs associated with BIA locate requests could range from $331,000 to $553,000 (gross) annually.

 

Providing utility locate services has proven to be a financial and administrative burden to BIAs resulting in the inconsistent provision of locate services and which may also result in delays to utility infrastructure projects.  ON1Call advises that some BIAs are refusing to provide these services or are not meeting required timelines, and therefore are in breach of the Act.  Failure to meet these requirements may result in enforcement action by ON1Call.

 

While this report recommends the City assume this responsibility on a 50 percent cost-recovery basis, BIAs will be relieved of the costly and time-consuming administration of the service and should benefit from lower locate costs as a result of being part of the larger City contract.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 2, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Utility Locate Services for Business Improvement Areas as Required by the Ontario Underground Infrastructure Notification Act (ON1Call) - Notice of Pending Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/bgrd/backgroundfile-107585.pdf)

(October 16, 2017) Report and Appendix 1 from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Utility Locate Services for Business Improvement Areas as Required by the Ontario Underground Infrastructure Notification Act (ON1Call)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/bgrd/backgroundfile-107966.pdf)

Confidential Attachment 1 - Confidential Information and Advice from the City Solicitor
Communications (City Council)
(November 18, 2017) E-mail from Buzz Brackenreid (CC.Main.PW24.3.1)
(December 5, 2017) Letter from Peter McClelland, Chair, Forest Hill Village Business Improvement Area (CC.New.PW24.3.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74382.pdf)


(Deferred by City Council from November 7, 2017 - 2017.PW24.4)
PW24.4

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Improving Accountability in the Utility Cut Process
The General Manager, Transportation Services has submitted a supplementary report on this Item (PW24.4a with recommendations)

Communications PW24.4.10 and PW24.4.11 have been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Public Works and Infrastructure Committee recommends that:  

 

1.   City Council approve the incorporation of the Universal Equipment Placement Guidelines, set out in Attachment 1 to the report (October 3, 2017) from the General Manager, Transportation Services into the Municipal Consent Requirements adhered to by all Utility companies.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Public Works and Infrastructure Committee:

 

1.  Requested the General Manager, Transportation Services to consult with ABC Residents Association and the Federation of North Toronto Residents' Associations (FoNTRA) and report directly to City Council on November 7, 2017 with this feedback.

Origin
(October 3, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Transportation Services
Summary

The City of Toronto is currently experiencing an unprecedented period of growth --with the GTA expected to grow from 6.7 million in 2016 to 9.6 million on 2041. In order to keep pace with this growth, upgrades to below-ground utilities are frequently required, impacting the surface of the Toronto's 5,600 kilometres of roads.

 

Typically, utility companies conduct work and then make temporary pavement repairs so that the area is passable until a permanent restoration can be completed. Although the utility companies fund all permanent restorations, the paving work is conducted by Transportation Services staff or their contractors within two (2) years after the utility cut permit has been issued.  Due to the long lead time between when the temporary and permanent pavement repairs occur, utility cuts have long been a concern to communities who want final restoration to the pavement, curbs, sidewalks, and sod in their neighborhoods as quickly as possible.

 

Transportation Services has revised the process for completing utility cut repairs in order to provider a higher quality of service to communities and a more straightforward final restoration process for the utilities. This report provides an overview of these recent process changes by City staff, defines a plan to eliminate the backlog of utility cut repairs that have developed, and improves the accountability of utility companies to complete their permanent restorations quickly and to a high quality standard.

 

In particular, this report provides an overview of the:

 

-   historic utility cut process;
-   challenges encountered with the current process; and
-   the process improvements developed in response, including:


-   allowing utility companies to carry out permanent repairs;
-   improvements to the manner in which residents are notified of pending work;
-   initiation of a consultant assignment in Q1 2018 to address the repair backlog;
-   modifications to the inspection process;
-   the development of Universal Equipment Placement Guidelines; and
-   implementation of a short-stream utility fee and maintenance fees for pavers.
 

The combination of these process changes will improve the condition of Toronto's roads, ensure proper notification to residents impacted by work, provide greater clarity to industry, and enhance staff's ability to manage the utility cut process.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 3, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Transportation Services on Improving Accountability in the Utility Cut Process
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/bgrd/backgroundfile-107510.pdf)

Attachment 1: Universal Equipment Placement Guidelines
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/bgrd/backgroundfile-107730.pdf)

Background Information (City Council)
(November 6, 2017) Supplementary report from the General Manager, Transportation Services on Improving Accountability in the Utility Cut Process (PW24.4a)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109274.pdf)

Attachment 1: Revised Universal Equipment Placement Guidelines
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109275.pdf)

Attachment 2: Comments from Lianne Miller, ABC Residents Association
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109276.pdf)

Attachment 3: Comments from the Federation of North Toronto Residents Association
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109277.pdf)

Speakers

Cathie Macdonald, Co-Chair, Federation of North Toronto Residents' Associations
M.H. Spence, ABC Residents Association
Lianne Miller, ABC Residents Association
Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam

Communications (Committee)
(October 11, 2017) E-mail from David S. Crawford, Streetscape, St. Lawrence Neighbourhood Association (PW.Supp.PW24.4.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/comm/communicationfile-72905.pdf)

(October 16, 2017) Letter from Linda McCarthy, Vice-President, Lytton Park Residents Association (PW.Supp.PW24.4.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/comm/communicationfile-72900.pdf)

(October 17, 2017) Letter from Geoff Kettel, Co-Chair, Federation of North Toronto Residents' Associations (FoNTRA) and Cathie Macdonald Co-Chair, Federation of North Toronto Residents' Associations (FoNTRA) (PW.New.PW24.4.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/comm/communicationfile-72932.pdf)

(October 17, 2017) Letter from Lianne Miller and Mary Helen Spence on behalf of ABC Residents Association (PW.New.PW24.4.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/comm/communicationfile-72945.pdf)

(October 18, 2017) Submission from Mary Helen Spence, ABC Residents Association (PW.New.PW24.4.5)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/comm/communicationfile-72967.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(November 4, 2017) Letter from Lianne Miller, Director, ABC Residents Association (CC.Supp.PW24.4.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74007.pdf)

(November 6, 2017) Letter from Geoff Kettel and Cathie Macdonald, Co-Chairs, Federation of North Toronto Residents' Association (CC.Supp.PW24.4.7)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74006.pdf)

(November 6, 2017) E-mail from David S. Crawford, Streetscape Coordinator, St. Lawrence Neighbourhood Association (CC.New.PW24.4.8)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74008.pdf)

(November 7, 2017) E-mail from Ron Palmer, Bloor-Yorkville Business Improvement Area (CC.New.PW24.4.9)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74009.pdf)

(November 26, 2017) Letter from Lianne Miller, Director, ABC Residents Association, John Caliendo and Ian Carmichael, Co-Presidents, ABC Residents Association, Cathie MacDonald and Geoff Kettel, Co-Chairs, Federation of North Toronto Residents Associations and Ron Palmer, Vice-Chair, Bloor-Yorkville Business Improvement Area (CC.Main.PW24.4.10)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74223.pdf)

(November 26, 2017) Letter from Linda McCarthy, Vice-President, Lytton Park Residents' Organization Inc. (CC.Main.PW24.4.11)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74224.pdf)


(Deferred by City Council from November 7, 2017 - 2017.PW24.5)
PW24.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:26, 27, 28, 29 

Speed Limit on Bayview Avenue from Pottery Road (Northerly Intersection) to River Street Ramp
Communications PW24.5.10 to PW24.5.12 have been submitted on this Item.

Bill 1410 has been submitted on this Item

Second Item on Friday, December 8th
Committee Recommendations

The Public Works and Infrastructure Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council designate a 60 km/h speed limit on Bayview Avenue, from Pottery Road (southerly intersection) to River Street Ramp.

Origin
(October 3, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Transportation Services
Summary

In July 2016, City Council unanimously endorsed the Vision Zero Road Safety Plan (RSP) 2017-2021, which included the reduction of the regulatory speed limit on various streets including Bayview Avenue, between Pottery Road (northerly intersection) and River Street Ramp, from 60 km/h to 50 km/h. 

 

While this speed limit reduction was made as part of the Road Safety Plan, this section was one of 18 road segments identified where changes were recommended not from a collision history perspective, but to improve consistency with adjacent sections of the same road.

 

Following installation of 50 km/h speed limit signs on June 6, 2017, concerns have been expressed about the disparity between the speed limit and the speeds at which drivers are travelling.

 

Based on a speed study and a review of the design of the roadway, collision history, and the existing road environment, staff have determined that a speed limit of 60 km/h is more appropriate for Bayview Avenue from Pottery Road to River Street Ramp. 

Background Information (Committee)
(October 3, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Transportation Services on Speed Limit on Bayview Avenue from Pottery Road (Northerly Intersection) to River Street Ramp
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/bgrd/backgroundfile-107509.pdf)

Attachment 1: Map of Speed and Volume Counts on Bayview Avenue
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/bgrd/backgroundfile-107512.pdf)

Communications (Committee)
(October 13, 2017) E-mail from Edmund Hogan (PW.Supp.PW24.5.1)
(October 16, 2017) Letter from Geoff Kettel and Lois Fliss, Co-Captains, Cycle 26 (PW.Supp.PW24.5.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/comm/communicationfile-72907.pdf)

(October 11, 2017) E-mail from Briar Riddell (PW.New.PW24.5.3)
(October 17, 2017) E-mail from Sylvia Slaughter Co-Chair Ward 30 Bikes  (PW.New.PW24.5.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/comm/communicationfile-72944.pdf)

(October 11, 2017) E-mail from Lucinda Glenny (PW.New.PW24.5.5)
(October 17, 2017) E-mail from Vivien Leong and Adam Cohoon on behalf of Walk Toronto (Steering Committee) (PW.New.PW24.5.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pw/comm/communicationfile-72963.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(October 23, 2017) E-mail from Fiona Donoghue-Paylor (CC.Main.PW24.5.7)
(November 2, 2017) Letter from Kathy Chung, Ward 29 Bikes (CC.Supp.PW24.5.8)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-73983.pdf)

(November 6, 2017) Letter from Robin Buxton Potts, Officer, Government and Stakeholder Relations, Evergreen (CC.New.PW24.5.9)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-73984.pdf)

(December 1, 2017) E-mail from Arthur Klimowicz (CC.Supp.PW24.5.10)
(December 3, 2017) Letter from Vivien Leong and Adam Cohoon on behalf of Walk Toronto (Steering Committee) (CC.Supp.PW24.5.11)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74326.pdf)

(December 8, 2017) E-mail from Robert Pylypiw (CC.New.PW24.5.12)

(Deferred by City Council from November 7, 2017 - 2017.ST14.5)
ST14.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Appointment to fill a vacancy on the Federation of Canadian Municipalities Board of Directors
Committee Recommendations

The Striking Committee recommends that:

 

1.   City Council appoint Councillor Norman Kelly to the Federation of Canadian Municipalities Board of Directors for a term ending at the Annual Meeting in May 2018.

Origin
(October 17, 2017) Report from the City Clerk
Summary

The purpose of this report is to fill a vacancy on the Federation of Canadian Municipalities Board of Directors resulting from the passing of Councillor Pam McConnell.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 17, 2017) Report from the City Clerk on Appointment to fill a vacancy on the Federation of Canadian Municipalities Board of Directors
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/st/bgrd/backgroundfile-108000.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Members' preferences for appointment to the Federation of Canadian Municipalities Board of Directors
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/st/bgrd/backgroundfile-108001.pdf)

Communications (Committee)
(October 26, 2017) Letter from Councillor Neethan Shan, Ward 42 Scarborough-Rouge River (ST.Supp.ST14.5.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/st/comm/communicationfile-73199.pdf)


(Deferred by City Council from November 7, 2017 - 2017.ST14.11)
ST14.11

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Council Member Appointment to the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority Regional Watershed Alliance
Committee Recommendations

The Striking Committee submits the Item to City Council without recommendation as all motions lost on tie votes.

Origin
(October 17, 2017) Report from the City Clerk
Summary

The purpose of this report is to recommend the appointment of a Member of Council to the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority Regional Watershed Alliance.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 17, 2017) Report form the City Clerk on Council Member Appointment to the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority Regional Watershed Alliance
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/st/bgrd/backgroundfile-108014.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Members' preferences for appointment to the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority Regional Watershed Alliance
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/st/bgrd/backgroundfile-108015.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Draft Terms of Reference for the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority Regional Watershed Alliance
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/st/bgrd/backgroundfile-108016.pdf)

Speakers

Councillor Janet Davis

Communications (Committee)
(October 26, 2017) Letter from Councillor Janet Davis, Ward 31 Beaches-East York (ST.New.ST.14.11.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/st/comm/communicationfile-73221.pdf)


(Deferred by City Council from November 7, 2017 - 2017.TE27.46)
TE27.46

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:20 

Construction Staging Area - 4 Avenue Road
Bill 1387 has been submitted on this Item.
Community Council Recommendations

The Toronto and East York Community Council recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the closure of the west sidewalk and a 2.9 metres wide portion of the southbound curb lane on Avenue Road, between a point 52.5 metres north of Bloor Street West and a point 56.4 metres further north and the provision of a sidewalk within the closed lane from January 8, 2018 to January 31, 2019.

 

2.  City Council approve the closure of the west sidewalk and a 2.9 metres wide portion of the southbound curb lane on Avenue Road, between a point 52.5 metres north of Bloor Street West to Prince Arthur Avenue and the provision of a sidewalk within the closed lane from February 1, 2019 to March 31, 2019.

 

3.  City Council approve the closure of the west sidewalk and a 2.9 metres wide portion of the southbound curb lane on Avenue Road, between a point 75.7 metres north of Bloor Street West and Prince Arthur Avenue and the provision of a sidewalk within the closed lane from April 1, 2019 to July 31, 2019.

 

4.  City Council prohibit stopping all times on the west side of Avenue Road, between a point 17.5 metres north of Bloor Street West and Prince Arthur Avenue.

 

5.  City Council direct the applicant to post a 24-hour monitored construction hotline number on the hoarding board, which must be prominently placed and legible from 20 metres and on all elevations from the construction site.

 

6.  City Council direct the applicant to work with the STEPS Initiative to provide and install public art, including mural artwork, on every elevation of the hoarding board with adequate spotlighting for night-time illumination, at sole cost to the applicant and to the satisfaction of the Ward Councillor.

 

7.  City Council direct that Avenue Road be returned to its pre-construction traffic regulations and lane configurations when the project is completed.

Origin
(September 27, 2017) Report from Acting Director, Transportation Services, Toronto and East York District
Summary

As the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) operates a transit service on Avenue Road, City Council approval of this report is required.

 

PCL Constructors Canada Incorporated is redeveloping the existing Park Hyatt hotel at 4 Avenue Road, located in the north-west corner of Avenue Road and Bloor Street West.

 

Transportation Services is requesting approval to close the sidewalk and a portion of the southbound curb lane on the west side of Avenue Road fronting the site for a period of 19 months in order to enable construction of the above mentioned redevelopment. Pedestrian operations will be maintained within the closed portion of the southbound curb lane.

Background Information (Community Council)
(September 27, 2017) Report and Drawings from the Acting Director, Transportation Services, Toronto and East York District - Construction Staging Area - 4 Avenue Road
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/te/bgrd/backgroundfile-107547.pdf)


Executive Committee - Meeting 29
EX29.1

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

SmartTrack Project Update and Next Steps
Mayor's Key Matter and first Item of business on Tuesday, December 5th.

Communications EX29.1.8 to EX29.1.10 have been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the concepts for the SmartTrack stations outlined in Attachment 1 to the report (November 17, 2017) from the City Manager and the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, as the basis for completing station design work, and authorize the City to act as co-proponents with Metrolinx for, and together commence, the Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP) for the SmartTrack stations, which will consider the following station-specific design elements:

            

a.  St. Clair-Old Weston SmartTrack station will be coordinated with the ongoing work on the St. Clair Avenue West Transportation Master Plan, and all efforts made to advance aspects of that Master Plan concurrently with the station;

 
b.  King-Liberty SmartTrack station will include the consideration of strong connections for pedestrians and cyclists directly into Liberty Village, provision for the King High Line crossing and other enhancements to cycling infrastructure in and through the area;

 
c.  East Harbour SmartTrack station will be fully integrated into the broader Unilever Precinct planning process to support the development of this area as a major employment area;

 
d.  Gerrard-Carlaw SmartTrack station will include entrances that optimize connections with the planned Relief Line station, other transit lines and the broader station area;

 
e.  Lawrence-Kennedy SmartTrack station will feature direct access from the Lawrence Avenue overpass, and will allow for the continued operation of Line 3 until the opening of the Scarborough Subway Extension while optimizing connections to areas of potential future development north of Lawrence Avenue; and

 
f.  Finch-Kennedy SmartTrack station will be integrated with a road-under-rail grade separation being constructed as part of Regional Express Rail, feature direct access from station entrances on Finch Avenue, include new local access roads at the north end of the station to provide for passenger pick up/drop off and consideration of improved access from areas south of the station.

 
2.  City Council request that Metrolinx include strong connections to Bloor Street and all provisions required to improve the network of pedestrian/cycling pathways along the GO corridor that were initiated through the Davenport Diamond Grade Separation project as part of the Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP) or addenda for the Bloor-Lansdowne GO Regional Express Rail station.

 
3.  City Council request that Metrolinx work in partnership with the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B to advance the Spadina-Front GO Regional Express Rail station, the Rail Deck Park proposal and other aligned capital projects in the rail corridor, and request consideration of a decking structure in the planning, design and engineering work for the Spadina-Front GO Regional Express Rail station, including but not limited to the station's Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP) or addenda.

 

4.  City Council direct staff to continue planning the Eglinton West LRT transit extension concept for the Toronto Segment between Mount Dennis Station and Renforth Station, including:


a. Ten stops as described in Attachment 2 to the report (November 17, 2017) from the City Manager and the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B; and


b. Direct staff to form a working group of community stakeholders in consultation with local councillors, to investigate further grade separation and or tunnelling options to further develop traffic modelling and an enhanced framework that places additional consideration on local community interest.

 
5.  City Council request Metrolinx to engage in discussions with the City on required resources to support timely implementation of the Metrolinx Regional Express Rail program and authorize the City Manager and any other relevant City officials to execute an agreement with Metrolinx to have Metrolinx fund:

 

a.  Dedicated City staff resources in support of Regional Express Rail implementation in Toronto; and

 
b.  The City's Property Acquisition Unit to provide property acquisition services for transit expansion initiatives to Metrolinx, including the Light Rail Transit and Regional Express Rail programs in Toronto.

 
6.  City Council forward the City's submission on Metrolinx's draft Regional Transportation Plan as outlined in Attachment 5 to the report (November 17, 2017) from the City Manager and the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, to Metrolinx and the Ministry of Transportation.

Origin
(November 17, 2017) Report from the City Manager and the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B
Summary

In July 2016, City Council conditionally approved the SmartTrack concept, based on initial business cases included in the report EX16.1 Developing Toronto's Transit Network Plan to 2031. The SmartTrack concept includes two components. The first component is an integrated SmartTrack/Regional Express Rail (RER) service on the Kitchener and Stouffville/Lakeshore East GO corridors with service frequencies of 6-10 minute peak service and 15-minute off-peak service at fourteen stations, which includes six new SmartTrack stations. The second component is an extension of the Eglinton West Light Rail Transit (LRT) line from Mount Dennis Station to Renforth (at Commerce Boulevard) with between 8 and 12 stops. The potential for a further extension of the Light Rail Transit to Toronto Pearson International Airport is also under review.

 

In November 2016, City Council committed funding to advance the planning and design of the SmartTrack concept to a Class 3 cost estimate (approximately 15-30 percent design), at which time City Council will decide whether to commit funding to procurement and construction of SmartTrack. The staged decision-making process for SmartTrack is outlined in the "Stage Gate Process" agreed to by the City and the Province in the report EX19.1 Transit Network Plan Update and Financial Strategy. This report provides recommendations to advance both components of the SmartTrack project.

 

SmartTrack/Regional Express Rail Integration

 

The planning and design of the six new SmartTrack stations to be incorporated into the overall SmartTrack/Regional Express Rail integration concept have been further advanced to address the City's policy and planning objectives. Attachment 1 includes the emerging station concepts that have resulted from stakeholder and community consultation and collaboration with Metrolinx. The concepts in Attachment 1 will inform the Environmental Project Reports for each station. The report recommends City Council approve the concepts for the new SmartTrack and GO Regional Express Rail stations, and authorize the City to act as co-proponents with Metrolinx in the Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP) for the SmartTrack stations, which will commence in the first quarter 2018. This recommendation allows the SmartTrack stations to proceed to the next stage of work. Staff will report to City Council in the second quarter of 2018 to seek authority to proceed to procurement and construction of the new stations. A Class 3 cost estimate and updated funding and financing strategy for the stations will be included in the next report. 

 

Eglinton West Light Rail Transit Extension

 

The Eglinton West Light Rail Transit extension includes two components which are currently in different stages of development. The extension from Mount Dennis Station to Renforth (at Commerce Boulevard), which is the segment located in Toronto (i.e., the "Toronto Segment"), is the furthest advanced. In 2016, City Council requested staff to undertake further analysis of potential stop locations included in the approved 2010 Environmental Assessment (EA)/Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP), and to also review potential grade separations for the Toronto Segment. The results of this analysis are outlined in Attachment 2. It is recommended that City Council approve a 10-stop at-grade Light Rail Transit concept for the Toronto Segment of the project and no longer consider grade separations as staff finalize the alignment for the full Light Rail Transit extension.

 

The City is supporting Metrolinx in its study of a potential extension of the Light Rail Transit from Renforth to Toronto Pearson International Airport (i.e., the "Airport Segment") in partnership with the City of Mississauga and the Greater Toronto Airport Authority (GTAA). Further direction on potential alignment options for the Airport Segment is required to finalize the full alignment of the Light Rail Transit project. The City has also initiated a comprehensive traffic modelling study in the Martin Grove Road area to address traffic management concerns. The outcomes of this study may result in further refinement of the Light Rail Transit alignment west of Martin Grove Road. Further public and stakeholder consultation will be undertaken as this work develops. A final alignment for the Light Rail Transit will be recommended to City Council in the second quarter of 2018, at which time staff will seek authority to amend the approved Environment Assessment/Transit Project Assessment Process in partnership with Metrolinx.

 

Regional Express Rail

 

Attachment 3 of the report provides an update from Metrolinx on the implementation of Metrolinx's Regional Express Rail program, which is foundational to the SmartTrack/Regional Express Rail integration concept described above. Regional Express Rail is a transformational program to provide increased service on core portions of the GO Rail network. This report recommends City Council request Metrolinx to engage in discussions with the City on required resources to support timely implementation of the Regional Express Rail program and authorize the City Manager to execute an agreement with Metrolinx to have Metrolinx fund City positions to provide services in support of Regional Express Rail implementation in Toronto.

 

Regional Transportation Plan

 

In September 2017, Metrolinx released the Draft 2041 Regional Transportation Plan (the "Draft Plan") for public consultation. The City is working closely with Metrolinx to ensure the elements of the Draft Plan align with the City's transit and transportation policies and priorities. The City and Toronto Transit Commission are key partners in delivering improved mobility outcomes in the region and should be considered a key partner in the next iteration of the Draft Plan. The City has prepared a submission to Metrolinx in response to the Draft Plan which is included as Attachment 5. This report requests City Council forward the contents of the submission to Metrolinx and the Ministry of Transportation. Metrolinx will be reporting back to their Board in December 2017 with a Draft Final Plan.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 17, 2017) Report from the City Manager and the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B on SmartTrack Project Update and Next Steps
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109125.pdf)

Attachment 1 - New SmartTrack/GO Regional Express Rail Stations Technical and Planning Update
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109249.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Eglinton West Light Rail Transit Extension Technical and Planning Update
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109250.pdf)

Attachment 3 - Metrolinx Update on Regional Express Rail
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109251.pdf)

Attachment 4 - City response to Metrolinx re: additional information on the proposed Lawrence East station
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109252.pdf)

Attachment 5 - City response to Metrolinx re: Draft 2041 Regional Transportation Plan for the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109253.pdf)

Speakers

Raymond Shen
Hamish Wilson
Brenda  Thompson , Scarborough Transit Action
John Di Salvo, Richmond Gardens Ratepayers Association RGRRA
Councillor Janet Davis
Councillor John Campbell
Councillor Stephen Holyday
Councillor Gord Perks
Councillor Paula Flecther

Communications (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) E-mail from Hamish Wilson (EX.Supp.EX29.1.1)
(November 27, 2017) E-mail from Sharon Yetman (EX.Supp.EX29.1.2)
(November 27, 2017) E-mail from Emily Hanna, President, NAIOP Greater Toronto Chapter (EX.Supp.EX29.1.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74104.pdf)

(November 27, 2017) E-mail from Arjun Chowdhury, Director, Asset Management, the Airport Corporate Centre Landowners' Committee  (EX.Supp.EX29.1.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74108.pdf)

(November 28, 2017) Submission from Raymond Shen (EX.New.EX29.1.5)
(November 28, 2017) Letter from Howard Eng, President and Chief Executive Officer, Greater Toronto Airports Authority GTAA (EX.New.EX29.1.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74143.pdf)

(November 28, 2017) E-mail from Joseph Lorinez (EX.New.EX29.1.7)
Communications (City Council)
(November 28, 2017) Letter from Jennifer Huntley, Director of Leasing, Retail Division, Davpart Inc. (CC.Main.EX29.1.8)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74229.pdf)

(November 29, 2017) Submission from Sharon Yetman (CC.Main.EX29.1.9)
(November 30, 2017) Submission from Sharon Yetman (CC.Supp.EX29.1.10)

EX29.2

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Rail Deck Park - Results of Feasibility Analysis and Next Steps for Implementation
Mayor's Key Matter and second Item of business on Tuesday, December 5th.

See also Item TE28.7
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A, the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the Acting Chief Financial Officer, in consultation with City Solicitor to:

 

i.  advance the Stage Two Work Plan for Rail Deck Park in 2018 and 2019 as described in this report, and

 

ii.  utilize the City-owned lands in the rail corridor only in a manner consistent with the future establishment of a comprehensive park and open space development in the rail corridor area.

 

2.  City Council request Metrolinx to work in partnership with the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, to advance the Spadina-Front GO station, the Rail Deck Park proposal and other aligned capital projects in the rail corridor, and request consideration of a decking structure in the planning, design and engineering work for the Spadina-Front GO station, including but not limited to the station's Transit Project Assessment Process ("TPAP") or addenda.

 

3.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Acting Chief Financial Officer to advance the development of a growth-focused financial strategy for Rail Deck Park based on the following principles:

 

a.  a portion of Section 42 cash-in-lieu of parkland ("Section 42 CIL") contributions and other growth-related funds previously collected from development activity in Downtown Toronto will be applied towards project costs in a way that does not negatively impact on any parkland revenues generated for other areas of the city, and in accordance with existing allocation policies;

 

b.  incremental revenues from future rate increases to existing and/or new growth-related revenue tools, including Section 42 Cash-in-Lieu of parkland contributions, Section 37 contributions, Development Charges, and appropriate value capture tools, will be applied in such a manner that benefits all projects including the Rail Deck Park project and other parkland priorities across the city;

 

c.  commercial contributions will be sought that reflect the proportional benefit for properties and businesses in areas surrounding the project site resulting from the investment in Rail Deck Park;

 

d.  Federal and/or Provincial contributions will be sought through upcoming intergovernmental negotiations taking into account an assessment of potential economic and fiscal impacts; and

 

e.  a phased approach for implementation and construction of Rail Deck Park will be established consistent with projected revenues and contributions anticipated through Recommendations 3a, 3b, 3c, and 3d above.

 

4.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B and the Acting Chief Financial Officer to proactively consult with the development and business communities concerning the principles of the financial strategy, including potential funding options, and any additional options to improve the development review process emanating from the End to End Review.

 

5.  City Council direct the Acting Chief Financial Officer to:

 

a.  engage land development, capital market and legal expertise in assessing the appropriate financing strategy for the project as required; and

 

b.  report back to Council with the implementation of this recommended strategy once the cost for securing the use and/or ownership of necessary properties is known and capital cost estimates have been refined in order for Council to confirm its definitive commitment to the project.

 

6.  City Council direct the Acting Chief Financial Officer to include eligible components of the Rail Deck Park project costs in the City's development charges by-law review currently underway.

 

7. City Council request the Province of Ontario to amend the Development Charges Act, 1997 ("DCA"), and to make any necessary regulation in order to:

 

a. exempt the Rail Deck Park project from the use of the service level cap;

 

b. include Rail Deck Park in the list of services not subject to a 10 percent reduction; and

 

c. deem any potential Federal/Provincial contributions towards the project to be used to benefit existing development.

 

8.  City Council request the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, the General Manager of Parks, Forestry and Recreation and the Director, Toronto Office of Partnerships and other staff as appropriate to:

 

a.  undertake a public and stakeholder engagement process to inform early-stage design, including the formation of a Community Stakeholder Advisory Group;

 

b.  undertake a public ideas competition;

 

c.  develop a fundraising strategy and evaluate the potential for sponsorship and donations to support the project; and

 

d.  evaluate governance options for long-term programming, operations, and maintenance for Rail Deck Park.

 

9.  City Council request the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, and the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A, in consultation with the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and the Acting Chief Financial Officer, to ensure that the Rail Deck Park Implementation Strategy be developed consistent with the principles and directions of the Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan and that this be addressed in the next report to Council.

 

10.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, and the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A, in consultation with the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and the Acting Chief Financial Officer, to assess the opportunities to create new connections to Rail Deck Park as part of the Stage Two Work Plan, including the Green Line along the hydro lands and the northern and southern extensions of the West Toronto Railpath, for the purpose of creating an inter-connected network of parks, with the next report to Council to include feasibility and funding options.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Deputy City Manager, Cluster B and the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning gave a presentation on Update on Rail Deck Park, Parkland Strategy and Section 42 Review.

 

The Executive Committee considered items EX29.2, EX29.3 and EX29.4 together.

Origin
(November 20, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A, the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the Acting Chief Financial Officer
Summary

This report provides an update on the implementation strategy for the "Rail Deck Park" project approved by Council in October 2016. The scope of the proposed project is a 20 acre decking structure and park facility to be constructed in the Union Station Rail Corridor between Bathurst Street and Blue Jays Way.

 

This report provides summary information for the following areas:

 

-  Context and rationale for the project;

-  Emerging scope, phasing and order of magnitude costing;

-  Update on a "growth-focused" financial strategy;

-  Update on real estate matters; and

-  Recommendations for stage two of the project.

 

A separate report entitled "Rail Deck Park - City-Initiated Official Plan Amendment - Final Report" from the Acting Director, Community Planning, Toronto and East York (TE28.7) with recommendations to establish the land use designation for the area over the rail corridor as Parks and Open Space Areas was unanimously adopted by Toronto and East York Community Council on November 14, 2017.

 

1. Opportunity to Support Growth and Provide City-Wide Benefits

 

Rail Deck Park is a once-in-a-generation opportunity for a major new park that supports future development in Downtown Toronto while also providing city-wide benefits.

 

Over the past decade, there has been a fundamental shift in the amount of growth experienced across the city. Development intensity has been particularly acute in the core of the city where population grew by roughly three times the rate of the preceding ten years (40 per cent compared to 13 per cent).

 

The creation of new parks has not kept pace with this level of growth. Only two new parks provided in the Downtown area over the past 10 years have been greater than 3 hectares in size. The City is challenged in acquiring significant new parkland in a competitive real estate market. Typical land acquisition costs for free and unencumbered properties in the western area of Downtown Toronto range between $95 and $115 million per acre.

 

Significant Downtown population growth is expected to continue for the foreseeable future, with current projections showing that 140,000 to 180,000 units could be added through 2041.

 

If this growth is to continue, there is a need for significant new infrastructure, including parkland, to ensure the quality of life, health, and sustainability of Downtown neighbourhoods. If this cannot be achieved, it may be necessary for the City to reconsider the pace and amount of future development in the Downtown.

 

The rail corridor area is the last remaining site suitable for a major park (over 3 hectares) to support growth in the Downtown and serve as a city-wide asset.

 

Rail Deck Park will be the largest downtown park outside of the Don Valley. The proposed decking structure will support a fully functional park that, at full build-out, will comprise a total area of approximately 8.3 hectares or 20 acres, excluding the Metrolinx property at the corner of Front Street and Spadina Avenue. Inclusion of the Metrolinx-owned property increases the potential park area to approximately 8.8 hectares or 21 acres (refer to Figure 2 in the Comments section.)

 

A park of this scale is a city-wide asset that offers unique programming and design opportunities not available in smaller parks, such as a mix of recreation, natural areas, and cultural uses. It will unite surrounding visitor attractions (Rogers Centre, Ripley's Aquarium, Fort York) into a major destination district and enhance regional connectivity by integrating with the planned GO Regional Express Rail network.

 

Rail Deck Park also has the potential to strengthen Toronto's global image and competitive position by creating an iconic new public space that exemplifies livability, cultural vibrancy, social inclusiveness, environmental resiliency, and civic pride.

 

2. Design Concept and Costing Reflects Complexity of Building in the Rail Corridor

 

During the first stage of work, the City of Toronto engaged with Build Toronto to undertake a preliminary engineering and costing study for the decking structure to support Rail Deck Park. Reports and appendices from the study will be posted online on the City's project website at www.toronto.ca/raildeckpark prior to the November Executive Committee meeting.

 

The total preliminary cost estimate for the Rail Deck Park project (8.3 hectares; 20 acres) is $1.665 billion (2017 constant dollars) or approximately $83 million per acre. Project costs in this report represent order of magnitude (Class 4) estimates based on early-stage design concepts and the best information currently available for site conditions.

 

The cost estimate includes over $600 million in contingencies and allowances, as well as additional track-level work, reflecting the unique complexity and uncertainty of early-stage planning in the rail corridor. Cost estimates are subject to substantial refinement, including areas of potential savings, as the work proceeds through subsequent stages. Cost estimates do not include escalation or financing costs as detailed cash flows are not yet known.

 

Design and construction of the Rail Deck Park will be subject to multiple approvals and requirements for building in the rail corridor. The project will need to be coordinated with other major capital works. Cooperation with Metrolinx on aligned projects is critical to determining the ultimate scope, timelines, and cost of Rail Deck Park.

 

Implementation and construction of Rail Deck Park can be phased based on the availability of potential funding to be identified through financial strategy as well as various programming and design considerations.

 

A priority phase one option has been identified, extending from Spadina Avenue to the current location of the "Puente de Luez" pedestrian bridge, comprising an area of approximately 3.9 ha (9.5 acres) with a total cost of $872 million. The phase one area would create a large, contiguous park space to provide for a range of recreation and culture uses and support future expansion to the east and west (refer to Figure 7 of the Comments section).

 

3. Supported by a Growth-Focused Financial Strategy

 

Rail Deck Park is an investment to support future growth in Toronto. Therefore, the financial strategy will place an emphasis on incremental growth-related funding tools and revenues in such a manner that benefits all parkland priorities across the City, including Rail Deck Park.

 

Among these tools are Section 42 cash-in-lieu of parkland dedication ("Section 42 CIL") funds, which are collected from new development with the sole purpose of acquiring and developing parkland in the city. A separate report currently before Council ("Review of the City's Alternative Parkland Dedication Rate under Section 42 of the Planning Act") describes the ongoing challenges that the City faces in using these funds for acquisition purposes in high growth areas and presents options for updating Section 42 Cash-in-Lieu of parkland dedication policies to better align with current development intensities.

 

Changes to the calculation of Section 42 Cash-in-Lieu of parkland dedication would provide potentially significant funding capacity for Rail Deck Park and enhance funding available for parkland priorities elsewhere in the Downtown and across the city. Updating the Section 42 Cash-in-Lieu of parkland dedication policies is a first and important step towards advancing the financial strategy for Rail Deck Park.

 

The financial strategy is also evaluating contributions from other revenue tools including Section 37 funds, development charges, and area-specific "value uplift capture” tools. This report recommends that eligible components of the project be included in the City's development charges bylaw review currently underway, and that Council request amendments to the Development Charges Act, 1997 to maximize the availability of development charges to support the project.

 

Additional funding sources to be explored as the project proceeds include sponsorships, donations, and contributions from other orders of government.

 

A financial strategy will be brought forward for Council consideration after refining project timelines and cost estimates, advancing changes to the existing growth focused tools (Section 42 Cash-in-Lieu of parkland dedication and Development Charges), further analysis of other funding tools, discussions with government partners regarding joint funding opportunities, and consultation with land development and capital market experts.

 

4. Securing the Rail Corridor Properties for Public Benefit

 

Almost three quarters of new park projects in Toronto involve the acquisition or conveyance of lands owned by third parties. These transactions can be highly complex.

 

A comprehensive legal review of current ownership confirms that there are four primary property owners in the Rail Deck Park project area: Metrolinx, the City of Toronto, Canadian National Railway Company ("CN") and The Toronto Terminals Railway Company Limited ("TTR"). All lands in the rail corridor were originally acquired for public purposes rather than private development.

 

Representations have been made in public by private parties claiming "development rights" over the rail corridor. However, as of the date of this report, the owners registered on title for these properties are Canadian National Railway Company and The Toronto Terminals Railway Company Limited.

 

City staff will be available to provide information concerning real estate matters to Executive Committee and City Council as required.

 

5. Advancing Planning and Design for Rail Deck Park

 

The project can be advanced through a "stage gate" capital planning process, providing Council with specific decision points about advancing the project as scope, timelines and costs are clarified. If Council adopts the recommendations in this report it will be authorizing staff to undertake a stage two ("due diligence and concept development") work plan in 2018 and 2019.

 

The purpose of the proposed stage two work plan is to address various technical, financial and real estate matters that are required prior to undertaking an Environmental Assessment process, putting forward a detailed financial strategy, and advancing a more detailed level of design.

 

Coordination will be required with Metrolinx and engineering experts to address various technical issues related to capital construction in the rail corridor. Alignment and partnership between the City and Metrolinx is critical to the delivery of Rail Deck Park, the Spadina-Front GO station and other capital projects in the rail corridor.

 

During stage two, the project team will continue to engage with members of the public to develop early-stage programming and design considerations for the project. Among the actions described for stage two are (i) formation of a Stakeholder Advisory Group representing community members and stakeholder groups; (ii) design work required to inform and frame a future International Design Competition; (iii) development of a fundraising strategy and; (iv) evaluation of governance options for the long-term operation and maintenance of Rail Deck Park.

 

A report on stage two outcomes will be brought forward to Council in 2019.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 20, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A, the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the Acting Chief Financial Officer on Rail Deck Park - Results of Feasibility Analysis and Next Steps for Implementation
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109121.pdf)

(November 28, 2017) Presentation from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B and the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on Update on Rail Deck Park, Parkland Strategy and Section 42 Review
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109483.pdf)

Speakers

Hamish Wilson
Mitch Gascoyne
Councillor Joe Cressy
Councillor Frances Nunziata
Councillor Janet Davis

Communications (Committee)
(November 16, 2017) Letter from Shamez Virani, President, CentreCourt (EX.Main.EX29.2.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-73993.pdf)

(November 21, 2017) Letter from George Huggins, Toronto Terminals Railway and Canadian National Railway (EX.Supp.EX29.2.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74041.pdf)

(November 27, 2017) Letter from Ira T. Kagan, Kagan Shastri Lawyers (EX.Supp.EX29.2.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74099.pdf)


EX29.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

City-Wide Real Estate - Amendments to Municipal Code Chapters and Shareholder Directions
Bills 1405 to 1409, inclusive have been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the municipal code chapter amendments in substantially the form as set out in Appendix A to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, effective January 1, 2018, subject to such stylistic or technical amendments as may be required by the City Solicitor.

 

2.  City Council approve the amendments to the shareholder directions for Build Toronto and the Toronto Port Lands Company in substantially the form as set out in Appendix B and Appendix C to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, effective January 1, 2018, subject to such technical amendments as may be required by the City Solicitor.

 

3.  City Council direct the City Solicitor to prepare and introduce any required amendments to the Municipal Code regulations for the Toronto Realty Agency (currently Chapter 215) and take any other necessary steps to give effect to the re-naming of the Toronto Realty Agency by the Toronto Realty Agency Board.

 

4.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to introduce the necessary bills to give effect to City Council's decisions in the report (November 15, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services.

Origin
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services
Summary

City Staff are recommending amendments to certain municipal code chapters and shareholder directions of two corporations, Build Toronto and Toronto Port Lands Company, to centralize real estate authorities and decision making on a City-wide basis (excluding Toronto Community Housing Corporation and Toronto Hydro).  A framework for centralizing City-wide real estate authorities was adopted by City Council on October 2, 3 and 4, 2017. City Council directed staff to report back in the fourth quarter of 2017 on the specific amendments required to implement the framework, including:

 

-Amendments to Shareholder Directions for Build Toronto and Toronto Port Lands Company, in order to establish appropriate authority for the Toronto Realty Agency over Build Toronto Inc. ("Build Toronto") and the Toronto Port Lands Company ("TPLC") and their respective holding subsidiaries and activities, and to effectively implement the new real estate model approved by City Council in May 2017; and

 
-Amendments to Municipal Code Chapters and delegated authorities for certain Agencies and Divisions including Toronto Transit Commission ("TTC"), Toronto Parking Authority ("TPA") and Board of Governors of Exhibition Place ("Exhibition Place"), Toronto Public Library ("TPL") and Parks Forestry and Recreation ("PF&R") to ensure that all real estate transactions are directed through the City's new real estate service delivery model and delegated authority approval process, effective January 1, 2018.
 

The new real estate model (consisting of the Toronto Realty Agency, plus the Real Estate Services and Facilities Management Divisions under the Deputy City Manager of Internal Corporate Services) will work in an integrated fashion to deliver real estate services to all City programs and execute the best solutions for the City as a whole. This includes driving major City-building and revitalization projects, unlocking value for City priorities (e.g. community, social, economic, and environmental opportunities), and delivering creative solutions to programs, residents and visitors of the city. All program commitments from Build Toronto and Toronto Port Lands Company will be maintained under the new real estate model and managed by the Toronto Realty Agency, such as targets for affordable housing and dividend commitments. New targets will be established as part of a City-wide real estate strategy that will be submitted to Council in 2019 with input from Divisions, City Councillors and other City stakeholders.

 

Once the City-wide real estate service delivery model is launched on January 1, 2018, the new Toronto Realty Agency and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, will collaborate to plan and execute real estate solutions in an integrated manner, while working closely with City Divisions, Agencies and Corporations. City Staff are also establishing a new name and brand for the Toronto Realty Agency through engagement with various stakeholders and will bring forward the naming and branding strategy to City Council in early 2018.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services on City-Wide Real Estate - Amendments to Municipal Code Chapters and Shareholder Directions
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109094.pdf)

Appendix A - Amendments to Municipal Code Chapters
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109168.pdf)

Appendix B - Revised Shareholder Direction - Build Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109169.pdf)

Appendix C - Revised Shareholder Direction - Toronto Port Lands Company
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109170.pdf)


EX29.6

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

New City of Toronto Investment Policy
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the Statement of Investment Policies and Procedures attached as Attachment 1 to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer.

 

2.  City Council request the Interim Chief Financial Officer, in consultation with the Investment Board, to report to the Executive Committee in the second quarter of 2018 on the selected Investment Manager's Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) polices, and other developments related to Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) factors.

Origin
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer
Summary

This report recommends a revised Investment Policy for Council's consideration.  The proposed Policy responds to amendments made by the Province through Ontario Regulation 360/15 ("the Regulation"), under the City of Toronto Act, 2006 that allow the City to invest its general and sinking funds, according to the "Prudent Investor" standard. This standard commonly guides pension and endowment fund investing in Ontario and other jurisdictions. Under this standard, the City will have considerably greater flexibility in the types of investments that it can make but the City must, according to the new regulation, "exercise the care, skill, diligence and judgement that a prudent investor would exercise" in making these investments.

 

This authority will come into effect on January 1, 2018.  Prior to that date, the City is required to complete the following two steps:

 

1.  establish an Investment Board (which was the subject of a report that was adopted by Council at its meeting held on March 28 and 29, 2017) to which Council delegates its investment powers; and

 

2.  approve an Investment Policy that will direct the Board's activities by establishing the City's requirements with respect to:

 

a.  Return on Investment;

b.  Risk Tolerance; and

c.  Liquidity.

 

At its May 16, 2017 meeting, Executive Committee directed staff to consult with the Investment Board regarding the proposed Investment Policy prepared by staff.

 

Staff have considered changes recommended by the Board and incorporated them into a revised Policy that is attached to this report.

 

The Board is required by regulation to develop an Investment Plan and strategy to be used to implement the Investment Policy.  Their Plan will define the methods and means that the Board will use to manage the City's investment portfolios within the parameters of the Policy.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer on New City of Toronto Investment Policy
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109144.pdf)

Attachment 1 - The Statement of Investment Policies and Procedures
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109145.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Equity Investment Components of Legacy City of Toronto Pension Funds
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109146.pdf)

Speakers

Derek Moran
Councillor Janet Davis


EX29.7

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Development of Low-Carbon Thermal Energy Networks (LCTEN)
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services to negotiate with Enwave Energy Corporation, based on the principles in Attachment 1 to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, the terms for a Joint-Development Agreement for the purpose of developing Low-Carbon Thermal Energy Networks, and report back to Council in the first quarter of 2018.

 

2.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services to undertake a business case study in consultation with the City Manager, to determine an appropriate governance and operational framework for a partnership with Enwave and to report back to Council in the first quarter of 2018.

 

3.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services to work with Enwave and key City divisions, agencies and corporations on the development of a portfolio of near-term opportunities, including applying for grants, entering into contribution agreements for grants if successful, and other due-diligence related activities.

Origin
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services
Summary

In June 2017, the Executive Committee directed the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services (then Chief Corporate Officer) to lead the negotiation of the necessary agreements for a business arrangement with Enwave Energy Corporation ("Enwave") for the development of Low-Carbon Thermal Energy Networks ("LCTEN").

 

The key objectives that have been identified include:

 

- Reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improve energy resilience;
- Achieve speed to market, scalability, and ability to fund projects identified for development; - including attracting grants from external parties;
- Foster economic development, City building, and new revenue opportunities;
- Mitigate risks associated with project development and operation; and
- Create balance between long term project development and the capability to initiate projects that are ready for development now.
 

The City is considering several potential organizational and governance models. The initial step is to enter into a Joint Develop Agreement with Enwave that will lead to the definition of the preferred governance and operational framework to be implemented. Negotiations with Enwave are ongoing and we will report back to Council in the first quarter of 2018.

 

The next steps are:

 

- The City and Enwave negotiate the terms a joint-development agreement (non-binding until approved by Council), consistent with the principles outlined in Attachment 1 for consideration and approval by Council in the first quarter of 2018.
- The City prepare a business case study to determine an appropriate governance and operational framework for a partnership with Enwave and to report back to Council in the first quarter of 2018.
- The City and Enwave continue due-diligence on near-term Low-Carbon Thermal Energy Networks development opportunities in specific geographic nodes.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 15, 2017) Report and Attachment 1 from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services on Development of Low-Carbon Thermal Energy Networks (LCTEN)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109095.pdf)

Communications (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from Bryan Purcell, Director of Policy and Programs, The Atmospheric Fund TAF (EX.New.EX29.7.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74102.pdf)


EX29.8

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Finalizing the Consolidation of Civic Theatres Toronto
Bill 1393 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:  

 

1.  City Council direct that the consolidation of the City's three civic theatre boards be finalized effective December 31, 2017, as follows:

 

a.  merge the Boards of Directors of the St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts, the Toronto Centre for the Arts and Civic Theatres Toronto into the Board of Directors of The Hummingbird (Sony) Centre for the Performing Arts;

 

b.  amend the objects and mandate of the Board of Directors of The Hummingbird (Sony) Centre for the Performing Arts to incorporate the mandate, powers and delegated authorities for Civic Theatres Toronto in its entirety as set out in Item EX7.15, as approved by City Council at its meeting of July 7, 8 and 9, 2015;

 

c.  dissolve the Boards of Directors of the St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts, the Toronto Centre for the Arts and Civic Theatres Toronto and rescind the appointments of the members to those boards; and

 

d.  change the name of the Board of Directors of the Hummingbird (Sony) Centre for the Performing Arts to the "Board of Directors of Civic Theatres Toronto".

 

2.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to introduce the necessary bills to give effect to the recommendations in the report (November 16, 2017) from the City Manager, including the repeal and/or amendment of Municipal Code Chapter 11, Arts Centres, of the former City of Toronto, By-law No. 177-81, as amended, of the former Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto and Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 23, Civic Theatres. 

Origin
(November 16, 2017) Report from the City Manager
Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek City Council approval to finalize the consolidation of Civic Theatres Toronto (CTT) in accordance with City Council's direction of July 2015, to take effect on December 31, 2017 in the manner recommended by the Board of Directors of Civic Theatres Toronto on October 26, 2017, and to enable Civic Theatres Toronto to use the Hummingbird (Sony) Centre for the Performing Arts' (Sony Centre) existing charitable registration.

 

The Civic Theatres Toronto Board's recommendations are based on legal advice received by the Civic Theatres Toronto Board that it use the Sony Centre corporate structure to become Civic Theatres Toronto in order to use its charitable status. 

Background Information (Committee)
(November 16, 2017) Report from the City Manager on Finalizing the Consolidation of Civic Theatres Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109124.pdf)


EX29.10

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Enhanced Security Measures at Toronto City Hall

Confidential Attachments 1 to 4 were made public with redactions on December 5, 2017
Confidential Attachment - The security of the property of the municipality or local board
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the review and enhancement of the vehicle mitigation measures as described in Confidential Attachment 1 (November 15, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and report to Council by March, 2018.

 

2.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, to review options for enhanced physical delineation, including ropes, in Committee rooms 1 and 2, and report back to Council before any installation occur, and report to Council by March, 2018.

 

3.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, to review options for enhanced physical delineation in Council Chambers, and report back to Council before any installation occurs.

 

4.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, to survey members of the public and City employees on patron screening at City Hall and report back to City Council by March, 2018.

 

5.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services to enact adjustments to the "Enhanced" security level based upon changes to the Domestic Terrorism Threat Level or upon advice from law enforcement.

 

6.  City Council direct that Confidential Attachments 1, 2, 3, and 4 to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, remain confidential in their entirety, as they contain information that involves the security of property belonging to the City or one of its agencies or corporations.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Executive Committee recessed its public session to meet in closed session as the item relates to the security of property of the municipality or local board.

Origin
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services
Summary

This report proposes changes to the current "Enhanced" level of security at Toronto City Hall for approval by City Council. These proposals are based upon assessments from the Toronto Police Service and Public Safety Canada, best practices, and benchmarking. The primary goals of these proposals are to maintain an accessible, safe, and secure Toronto City Hall while providing a reasonable level of protection from foreseeable threats.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services on Enhanced Security Measures at Toronto City Hall
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109093.pdf)

Confidential Attachment 1 - Recommended Enhanced Security Measures for Toronto City Hall
Confidential Attachment 2 - Review of Current Threat Environment
Confidential Attachment 3 - Summary of Toronto Police Service Vulnerability Assessment of Toronto City Hall
Confidential Attachment 4 - Summary of Public Safety Canada Critical Infrastructure Assessment of Toronto City Hall
Background Information (City Council)
(December 5, 2017) Redacted Confidential Attachment 1 - Recommended Enhanced Security Measures for Toronto City Hall - Made public on December 5, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109719.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) Redacted Confidential Attachment 2 - Review of Current Threat Environment - Made public on December 5, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109800.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) Redacted Confidential Attachment 3 - Summary of Toronto Police Service Vulnerability Assessment of Toronto City Hall - Made public on December 5, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109801.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) Redacted Confidential Attachment 4 - Summary of Public Safety Canada Critical Infrastructure Assessment of Toronto City Hall - Made public on December 5, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109802.pdf)

Speakers

Dave Meslin
Miroslav  Glavic
Riley Peterson, Budget Lead, Toronto Youth Cabinet
Neville Park
Derek Moran
Tim Maguire, President, Canadian Union of Public Employees CUPE Local 79
Miguel Avila-Velarde
Emily Daigle
Desmond Cole
Councillor Frances Nunziata
Councillor Joe Cressy
Councillor Shelley Carroll
Councillor Janet Davis
Councillor Paula Fletcher
Councillor Gord Perks

Communications (Committee)
(November 23, 2017) E-mail from Dave Johnson (EX.Supp.EX29.10.1)
(November 24, 2017) E-mail from Shane Cronin (EX.Supp.EX29.10.2)
(November 28, 2017) Submission from Katrina Miller, Strategic Communications and Campaigns, Canadian Union of Public Employees CUPE Local 79 (EX.New.EX29.10.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74144.pdf)


EX29.11

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

The Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council adopt the Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism as outlined in Attachment A to the report (November 15, 2017) from the City Manager.
 

2.  City Council adopt the 2018 Annual Work Priorities for year one implementation as outlined in Appendix B to the report (November 15, 2017) from the City Manager.

 
3.  City Council refer the new and enhanced request of $0.460 million gross and net for 5.0 positions and $0.535 million gross and net for community partnership initiatives, for a total of $0.995 million gross and net, and included in the 2018 Operating Budget Submissions for Social Development, Finance and Administration for consideration with other City priorities through the 2018 and future-year budget process.
 

4.  City Council request the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration, the Acting Director, Equity, Diversity, and Human Rights; and the Executive Director, Human Resources to form the City Steering Committee to lead the internal City systems change work of the Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism and to align this work with other equity-based initiatives to ensure combined impact.
 

5.  City Council approve the establishment of the Anti-Black Racism Partnership and Accountability Circle comprised of diverse Torontonians of African descent to support the implementation of the Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism in effective, collaborative and accountable ways.

 
6.  Subject to the adoption of Recommendation 5, City Council request the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration, the Acting Director, Equity, Diversity, and Human Rights; and the Executive Director, Human Resources, in collaboration with the Anti-Black Racism Partnership and Accountability Circle to report annually on the progress of implementation and the next year's work priorities.

 
7.  City Council forward the Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism as outlined in Appendix A to the report (November 15, 2017) from the City Manager, to the Board of Health, Toronto Library Board, Toronto Police Board, and Toronto Community Housing Corporation Board for their consideration.
 

8.  City Council forward Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism as outlined in Appendix A to the report (November 15, 2017) from the City Manager, to the Premier of Ontario and the Minister of Children and Youth Services for consideration on program and funding alignments.

Origin
(November 15, 2017) Report from the City Manager
Summary

Toronto is the most diverse city in the world. However, studies continue to show that anti-Black racism still exists in this city, affecting the life chances of more than 200,000 people of African descent who call Toronto home.  

 

Anti-Black racism is policies and practices embedded in Canadian institutions that reflect and reinforce beliefs, attitudes, prejudice, stereotyping and/or discrimination that is directed at people of African descent and is rooted in their unique history and experience of enslavement and colonization here in Canada.

 

The legacy of anti-Black racism lies in the current social, economic, and political marginalization of Torontonians of African descent. It is experienced as a lack of opportunity, poor health and mental health outcomes, poor education outcomes, higher rates of precarious employment and unemployment, significant poverty, and overrepresentation in the criminal justice, mental health, and child welfare systems. 

 

To begin confronting anti-Black racism in Toronto, the City of Toronto partnered with Black leaders and organizations to create and implement a four-phase process. Phase one was the development and launch of the Toronto For All campaign in November 2016, naming and challenging anti-Black racism for public education. Phase two was the review of 41 years' worth of research and recommendations about addressing anti-Black racism in Toronto. This review created the foundation for 41 Community Conversations in phase three to determine how best to take meaningful action going forward. Conversations ran from January to March 2017. Black Torontonians reviewed a draft action plan at a citywide workshop in May 2017 and provided feedback. In Phase four, City staff and subject matter experts from across Toronto's Black communities worked together to create work plans and to identify resource requirements to begin implementation.

 

The Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism is the result of this collaborative effort between the City of Toronto and Torontonians of African descent to take corrective action. 

 

This five-year plan leverages the talents, knowledge, and experiences of Black residents and Black organizations as partners in making municipal services, spaces and policies fully inclusive and accessible to Torontonians of African descent in both intent and in practice. The Action Plan includes 22 recommendations and 80 actions to address five issue areas: children and youth development; health and community services; job and income supports; policing and the justice system; and community engagement and Black leadership. This report recommends adoption and implementation of the Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 15, 2017) Report from the City Manager on The Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109126.pdf)

Attachment A - The Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109127.pdf)

Attachment B - 2018 Work Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109128.pdf)

Attachment C - Anti-Black Racism Partnership and Accountability Circle
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109129.pdf)

Speakers

Kemi Jacobs, Executive Director, Delta Family Resource Centre
Brianna Lerato Mokwele, African Canadian Social Development Council
Brandon Hay, Black Daddies Club
Desmond Cole
Kwame Brown, Skills for Change
Floydeen Charles-Fridal , Jamaican Canadian Association (JCA) and Caribbean African Canadian (CAFCAN) Social Services
Rudi Quammie Williams, Young and Potential Fathers Initiative
Emily Daigle
Councillor Shelley Carroll
Councillor John Campbell
Councillor Janet Davis

Communications (Committee)
(November 28, 2017) Letter from The Board of Directors of the JCA and the Board of Directors of CAFCAN (EX.New.EX29.11.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74141.pdf)

(November 28, 2017) Submission from Katrina Miller, Strategic Communications and Campaigns, Canadian Union of Public Employees CUPE Local 79 (EX.New.EX29.11.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74145.pdf)

(November 28, 2017) E-mail from Brian De Matos (EX.New.EX29.11.3)

EX29.12

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

TO Prosperity: Toronto Poverty Reduction Strategy 2017 Report and 2018 Work Plan
Communications EX29.12.19 and EX29.12.20 have been submitted on this Item
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council adopt the TO Prosperity 2018 Annual Work Plan for implementation as outlined in Attachment B to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration, and the General Manager, Toronto Employment and Social Services, and forward the initiatives with financial impacts to the City Manager for consideration as part of the 2018 Budget process.

 

2.  City Council request the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration to work with relevant City divisions and agencies and report back on the development of a City of Toronto Community Benefits Framework that includes:

 

a.  a comprehensive inventory of existing City processes and practices that leverage community benefits outcomes, including analyses of best practices, challenges, gaps, and opportunities;

 

b.  ways to maximize community benefits outcomes from large-scale private development proposals, through the enhancement of existing City practices and processes, or the leveraging of untapped opportunities.

 

3.  City Council direct the Executive Director, Human Resources, the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management Division and the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration, working in consultation with relevant stakeholders, and contingent on Council approval of resource requirements described in the 2018 operating budget proposal, to pilot-test standards in City contracts and procurement documents related to (i) advance notice of scheduling, and (ii) equitable hiring, and to report back to Executive Committee by the fourth quarter of 2019 on the feasibility of adopting these standards into City contracts and on their impacts for workers, vendors, and City operations.

 

4.  City Council direct the City Solicitor and the Executive Director, Human Resources, to report to the Employment and Labour Relations Committee on impacts of the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act for the City's employment relationships and labour agreements, within six months of Royal Assent of a new Provincial Act.

 

5.  City Council convey to the Province its support of the vision, objectives and recommendations of the Income Security: A Roadmap for Change report prepared by the Province's Income Security Reform Working Group, First Nations Income Security Reform Working Group and Urban Indigenous Table on Income Security Reform, and summarized in Attachment E to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration, and the General Manager, Toronto Employment and Social Services.

Origin
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration, and the General Manager, Toronto Employment and Social Services
Summary

In 2015, City Council unanimously approved TO Prosperity: Toronto Poverty Reduction Strategy. Designed as a 20-year strategy, TO Prosperity contains 17 recommendations divided in six core areas: housing stability, service access, transit equity, food access, quality jobs and livable incomes, and systemic change. Each recommendation is linked to a set of actions to be carried out over a four-year period. Annual work plans identify initiatives that advance the implementation of actions. Every year, staff report on the completion of ongoing initiatives and present a plan for the following year.

 

After a brief discussion of new Census and City data on poverty in Toronto, this report provides an overview of key developments in the core areas of the Poverty Reduction Strategy; topics include actions at the federal and provincial levels, progress on the 2017 Work Plan, highlights of the 2018 Work Plan, the first year of the Lived Experience Advisory Group (LEAG), and the launching of an Equity Responsive Budgeting Tool.

 

The report also examines two emerging processes with significant potential to reduce poverty reduction in Toronto, namely: City policies and programs aimed at leveraging the City's economic powers to drive inclusive economic development; and a report recently submitted to the Provincial government, by three Provincial Working Groups, recommending a 10-year roadmap to structural reform of Ontario's income security system, Income Security: A Roadmap for Change report.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration and the General Manager, Toronto Employment and Social Services on TO Prosperity: Toronto Poverty Reduction Strategy 2017 Report and 2018 Work Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109105.pdf)

Attachment A - Poverty Reduction Strategy 2017 Progress Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109106.pdf)

Attachment B - Poverty Reduction Strategy 2018 Work Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109110.pdf)

Attachment C - Poverty Reduction Strategy 2017 Report to the Community
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109116.pdf)

Attachment D - Social Procurement Program Detailed Activities
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109117.pdf)

Attachment E - Vision, principles, objectives, and recommendations put forward in the report Income Security: A Roadmap for Change
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109118.pdf)

Speakers

Rosemarie  Powell, Toronto Community Benefits Network
Natasha  Allen, Toronto Community Benefits Network
Bill Signal, TDBN
Patricia O'Connell, Sistering
Michael Rosenberg
Adina Lebo, Commitment to TOCommunity
Derek Moran
Riley Peterson, Budget Lead, Toronto Youth Cabinet
Kharthika Mohanachandran
Hamish Wilson
Kapri Rabin, Executive Director, Street Health
Councillor Janet Davis

Communications (Committee)
(November 24, 2017) E-mail from David Schatzky (EX.Supp.EX29.12.1)
(November 25, 2017) E-mail from John Ryerson (EX.Supp.EX29.12.2)
(November 25, 2017) E-mail from Cameron Watts (EX.Supp.EX29.12.3)
(November 26, 2017) E-mail from Heather McPherson (EX.Supp.EX29.12.4)
(November 27, 2017) E-mail from Hamish Wilson (EX.Supp.EX29.12.5)
(November 25, 2017) Letter from Lidia Monaco, Associate Executive Director, St. Stephen's Community House (EX.Supp.EX29.12.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74096.pdf)

(November 27, 2017) E-mail from Jane Mercer, Executive Co-ordinator, Toronto Coalition for Better Child Care (EX.Supp.EX29.12.7)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74097.pdf)

(November 27, 2017) Letter from Pedro Barata. Senior Vice President, Strategy and Community Impact, United Way Toronto and York Region (EX.Supp.EX29.12.8)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74106.pdf)

(November 27, 2017) Letter from Rachel Gray, Executive Director, The Stop Community Food Centre (EX.Supp.EX29.12.9)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74107.pdf)

(November 27, 2017) Letter from Rachel Gray, Citizen Chair, Toronto Food Policy Council Executive Director, The Stop Community Food Centre (EX.Supp.EX29.12.10)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74109.pdf)

(November 28, 2017) Submission from Michael Rosenberg (EX.New.EX29.12.11)
(November 28, 2017) Submission from Katrina Miller, Strategic Communications and Campaigns, Canadian Union of Public Employees CUPE Local 79 (EX.New.EX29.12.12)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74146.pdf)

(November 28, 2017) Letter from Kharthika Mohanachandran, Commitment TO Community  (EX.New.EX29.12.13)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74126.pdf)

(November 27, 2017) Letter from Michael Polanyi, Community Development Worker, Children's Aid Society of Toronto (EX.New.EX29.12.14)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74127.pdf)

(November 28, 2017) Letter from Nahum Mann, Our Toronto (EX.New.EX29.12.15)
(November 28, 2017) Letter from Calvin Henschell, Community Outreach Worker, Regent Park Community Health Centre  (EX.New.EX29.12.16)
(November 28, 2017) Letter from Leila Sarangi, Women's Habitat of Etobicoke (EX.New.EX29.12.17)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74163.pdf)

(November 28, 2017) Submission from Adina Lebo, Commitment to TO Community (EX.New.EX29.12.18)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74131.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(December 1, 2017) Letter from Rosemarie Powell, Executive Director, Toronto Community Benefits Network (CC.Supp.EX29.12.19)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74306.pdf)

(November 27, 2017) Letter from Shamsh Kara, Chair, Flemington Community Legal Services (CC.New.EX29.12.20)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74367.pdf)


EX29.13

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:27 

Creating Transitional Housing at 9 Huntley Street
Bill 1379 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office, to submit a request to the Ministry of Housing for funding through the Federal/Provincial Social Infrastructure Fund - Investment in Affordable Housing for Ontario Program - Rental Component in the amount of $3,000,000 to be used by the City to fund the acquisition ($2,700,000) and rehabilitation ($300,000) of 9 Huntley Street.

 

2.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office, in consultation with the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, to provide capital funding from the Land Acquisition Reserve Fund (XR1012) in an amount not to exceed $2,200,280 to fund the acquisition, including applicable closing costs, of 9 Huntley Street.

 

3.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services to negotiate, in consultation with the Director, Affordable Housing Office, the acquisition of the property known municipally as 9 Huntley Street with Casey House Hospice Inc. for a purchase price of $4,675,000 and authorize the City to enter into an agreement of purchase and sale (the "Agreement") substantially on the terms outlined in Appendix "A" to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Director, Affordable Housing Office, the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and the Interim Chief Financial Officer, and on such other or amended terms and conditions as may be acceptable to the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, in consultation with the Director, Affordable Housing Office, and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

 

4.  City Council authorize severally each of the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and the Director of Real Estate Services to execute the Agreement and any ancillary agreements and documents under the Agreement on behalf of the City.

 

5.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services to administer and manage the purchase of 9 Huntley Street from Casey House Hospice Inc., in consultation with the Director, Affordable Housing Office, including the provision of any consents, approvals, waivers and notices, provided that she may, at any time, refer consideration of any such matters (including their content) to City Council for its consideration and direction.

 

6.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to complete the contemplated purchase transaction on behalf of the City, including paying any necessary expenses, amending the closing, due diligence and other dates, and amending and waiving terms and conditions, on such terms as the City Solicitor considers reasonable.

 

7.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, in consultation with the Director, Affordable Housing Office, to negotiate an Offer to Lease with Fife House Foundation Inc., including any amendments in relation to such agreement not materially inconsistent with the terms and conditions described in Appendix B to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Director, Affordable Housing Office, the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and the Interim Chief Financial Officer, as approved by Council, and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

 

8.  City Council authorize the City to accept an Offer to Lease from Fife House Foundation Inc., or a related corporation formed for the purposes of this transaction, for a term of 20 years, for the property municipally known as 9 Huntley Street, substantially on the terms and conditions outlined in Appendix B to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Director, Affordable Housing Office, the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and the Interim Chief Financial Officer, and on such other or amended terms and conditions acceptable to the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, or her/his designate, and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

 

9.  City Council authorize severally the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the Director of Real Estate Services to accept the Offer to Lease on behalf of the City and to execute the lease on behalf of the City.

 

10.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to complete the Offer to Lease, the lease, deliver any notices, pay expenses and amend the commencement, due diligence and other dates to such earlier or later date(s), on such terms and conditions, as the City Solicitor may, from time to time, determine.

 

11.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, or her or his designate, to administer and manage the lease agreement, including the provision of any consents, approvals, notices and notices of termination provided that the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services may, at any time, refer consideration of such matters (including their content) to City Council for its determination and direction.

 

12.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office to negotiate and execute, on behalf of the City, the agreements and security required by the Province to obtain the funding set out in Recommendation No. 1 above on such terms and conditions satisfactory to the Director, Affordable Housing Office and in a form approved by the City Solicitor.

 

13.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office to assign the agreements and security for the federal/provincial funding obtained by the City to Fife House Foundation Inc., on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Director, Affordable Housing Office and in a form approved by the City Solicitor.

 

14.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office to execute, on behalf of the City, any security or financing documents or any other documents required to facilitate the funding process, including any documents required by Fife House Foundation Inc., or a related corporation or its mortgagee(s)  where and when required during the term of the municipal housing facility agreement.

 

15.  City Council authorize that the development at 9 Huntley Street be exempt from the payment of development charges and be exempt from the payment of planning and park dedication fees and building permits under existing City policy.

 

17.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to execute, on behalf of the City, any postponement, confirmation of status, discharge or consent documents relating to the security given to secure the Contribution Agreement entered into with the City of Toronto, or the assignee of the municipal capital facility agreement, for the construction of operation of affordable rental housing at 9 Huntley Street as required by normal business practices.

 

18. City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office to execute tri-partite agreements with leasehold mortgagees and any ancillary agreements and documents on behalf of the City.

 

19.  City Council approve an increase in the 2017 Approved Capital Budget for Shelter, Support and Housing Administration by a one-time basis by $500,000 gross, $0 net, fully funded by Section 37 (Planning Act Reserve Funds) community benefits from 43, 49, 51 Gerrard Street West and 695 Bay Street (source account XR3026-3700691) by adding a new capital project called "9 Huntley Street Acquisition", for the purposes of providing funds to Fife House Foundation Inc., for capital improvements to 9 Huntley Street.

 

20.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office to provide the $500,000 referred to in Recommendation 19 to Fife House Foundation Inc., subject to the Fife House Foundation Inc., signing an assignment of the municipal capital facility agreement, governing the use of the funds and the financial reporting requirements.

Origin
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Director, Affordable Housing Office, the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and the Interim Chief Financial Officer
Summary

In July, 2017 City Council directed City staff to conduct the necessary due diligence for the City to purchase 9 Huntley Street from Casey House and to report to Council on the possibility of the City acquiring the property to support homeless persons living with HIV/AIDS.

 

This report provides the results of that work and recommends that the City purchase the property at the below market rate of $4,675,000 and any closing costs identified by Real Estate Services estimated at $225,280. To support the purchase, the report recommends funding from the federal-provincial Investment in Affordable Housing (2014 Extension) program and the City’s Land Acquisition Reserve Fund (LARF) (XR 1012).

 

The report also recommends that the City enter into a 20-year lease with Fife House for a nominal sum to provide transitional housing for 20 vulnerable men who have HIV/AIDS and who are chronically homeless or at risk, and who are accessing the emergency shelters.

 

This new Fife House program will stabilize the housing of these individuals, improve health outcomes and reduce the use of emergency services.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 15, 2017) Report and Appendices A and B from the Director, Affordable Housing Office, the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Service and the Interim Chief Financial Officer on Creating Transitional Housing at 9 Huntley Street
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109111.pdf)


EX29.14

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:28 

Finalizing Plans for New Supportive Homes at 13-15 and 17-19 Winchester Street
Bill 1361 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:  

 

1.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office, to request the Ministry of Housing to issue a Conditional Letter of Commitment for funding through the Home For Good Program in the amount of $5,250,000 to be used by Margaret's Housing and Community Support Services Inc., or a related corporation, for the development of the affordable housing units at 13-15 and 17-19 Winchester Street.

 

2.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office, to submit a request to the Ministry of Housing for funding through the Home For Good Program in the amount of $5,250,000 to be used by Margaret's Housing and Community Support Services Inc., or a related corporation for the development of the affordable housing units at 13-15 and 17-19 Winchester Street.

 

3.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office, to provide capital funding from the Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing (XR1116) to Margaret's Housing and Community Support Services Inc., or a related corporation, in an amount not to exceed $2,500,000 to fund the expenses of modernization of 13-15 and 17-19 Winchester Street.

 

4.  City Council authorize the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to provide as required such Service Manager consents pursuant to the Housing Services Act as may be necessary to carry out the recommendations in the report (November 14, 2017) from the Director, Affordable Housing Office and the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration.

 

5.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office, in consultation with Shelter, Support and Housing Administration to:

 

a.  negotiate, enter into, and execute on behalf of the City, a municipal housing facility agreement, the City's "Contribution Agreement", with Margaret's Housing and Community Support Services Inc., or a related corporation, to secure the financial assistance, being provided and to set out the terms of the development and operation of the new affordable rental housing, on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Director, Affordable Housing Office and in a form approved by the City Solicitor; and

 

b.  execute, on behalf of the City, any security or financing documents or any other documents required to facilitate the funding process, including any documents required by Margaret's Housing and Community Support Services Inc., or a related corporation or its mortgagee(s) to complete construction and conventional financing and subsequent refinancing, where and when required during the term of the municipal.

 

6.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to execute, on behalf of the City, any postponement, confirmation of status, discharge or consent documents relating to the security given to secure the Contribution Agreement entered into with Margaret's Housing and Community Support Services Inc., or a related corporation, for the construction of operation of affordable rental housing at 13-15 and 17-19 Winchester Street as required by normal business practices.

 

7.  City Council exempt the 35 new affordable housing units to be developed at 13-15 and 17-19 Winchester Street from taxation for municipal and school purposes for the term of the municipal capital facility agreement.

 

8.  City Council authorize that the development on the Winchester Properties be exempt from the payment of development charges and be exempt from the payment of planning and park dedication fees and building permits under existing City policy.


9.  City Council authorize the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, in consultation with the Director, Affordable Housing Office, to make the necessary budget adjustments to the 2018 City Operating Budget for Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to utilize and spend (net $0) affordable housing funding from the capital and operating allocation from the Home For Good Program, with future year requests subject to Council approval through the annual budget process.

 

10.  City Council delegate authority to the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, in consultation with the Director, Affordable Housing Office, to approve the Affordability Payment Schedule and any updates required under the Home for Good Program.

Origin
(November 14, 2017) Report from the Director, Affordable Housing Office and the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration
Summary

This report provides the results of the due diligence conducted by the Affordable Housing Office and Margaret's Housing and Community Support Services Inc. (Margaret's) to complete the modernization of the buildings at 13-15 and 17-19 Winchester Street (the "Winchester Properties") to be leased from Toronto Community Housing Corporation (TCHC) into 35 new self-contained apartments.

 

This report also recommends the capital and operating funding necessary to proceed with the interior demolition and modernization.  Funding recommended includes capital and operating funding from the provincial Home For Good (HFG) program, and City funding sources. Margaret's will also make a financial contribution.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 14, 2017) Report from the Director Affordable Housing Office, and the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration on Finalizing Plans for New Supportive Homes at 13-15 and 17-19 Winchester Street
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109119.pdf)


EX29.15

ACTION 

 

 

 

New Supports and Housing for Survivors of Human Trafficking
Communication EX29.15.1 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office, to enter into an administration agreement and/or related agreement(s) with the Ministry of Housing, Ministry of Community and Social Services or any other provincial entity necessary for the receipt and expenditure of funding under the Anti-Human Trafficking Community Supports Fund and the Investment in Affordable Housing (IAH) Program on such terms and conditions as are satisfactory to the Director, Affordable Housing Office and the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, and in a form approved by the City Solicitor.

 

2.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office, in consultation with the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration to undertake the Anti-Human Trafficking Community Supports Fund and Investment in Affordable Housing Program administration in accordance with the related administration agreements, including appropriate measures as the program proceeds to adjust program parameters, recipients, and year-end funding among program components as required to ensure full and effective use of available Federal/Provincial funds.

 

3.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office in consultation with General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration to enter into agreements with the provincial government, other City divisions, community agencies, private entities and/or individuals to deliver the Anti-Human Trafficking Community Supports Fund and Investment in Affordable Housing program, in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Province's guidelines and the approved allocations on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Director, Affordable Housing Office and the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration in a form approved by the City Solicitor.

 

4.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office to:

 

a.  negotiate, enter into, and execute on behalf of the City, as necessary, a municipal housing facility agreement, a City "Contribution Agreement", or other agreements with Covenant House Toronto satisfactory to the Director, Affordable Housing Office, subject to receipt by the City of a business case for the repair and renovation of the property or properties and a program delivery plan, to secure the financial assistance being provided and to set out the terms of the project or projects and operation of the new affordable rental housing, on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Director, Affordable Housing Office and in a form approved by the City Solicitor; and

 

b.  execute, on behalf of the City, any security or financing documents or any other documents required to facilitate the funding process, including any documents required by Covenant House Toronto or its mortgagee(s) to complete construction and conventional financing and subsequent refinancing, where and when required during the term of the municipal housing facility agreement.

 

5.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to execute, postpone, confirm the status of, and discharge any City security documents registered as required by normal business practices.

 

6.  City Council authorize the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration and the Director, Affordable Housing Office, to make the necessary budget adjustments to the 2018 City Operating Budgets for Shelter, Support and Housing Administration and the Affordable Housing Office, to utilize and spend (net $0) affordable housing funding from the capital and operating allocations of the Investment in Affordable Housing Program and the Anti-Human Trafficking Community Support Fund, with future year requests subject to Council approval through the annual budget process.

 

7.  City Council authorize the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration to make the necessary budget adjustments to the 2018 City Operating Budget for Shelter, Support and Housing Administration and to enter into the appropriate agreements with the provincial government, other City divisions, community agencies, private entities and/or individuals to allocate the Investment in Affordable Housing Program rent supplements.

 

8.  City Council reiterate the request to the Federal government to establish an office under the jurisdiction of Public Safety Canada to take action and dedicate resources to eliminate and prevent all forms of domestic and international human trafficking, and to collaborate with other orders of government, community agencies, and survivors to reduce the impact of human trafficking in Toronto and across Canada.

Origin
(November 14, 2017) Report from the Director, Affordable Housing Office, the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, and the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration
Summary

This report seeks City Council approval to participate in and allocate funds to Covenant House Toronto from the new provincial Anti-Human Trafficking Community Supports Fund and the federal/provincial Investment in Affordable Housing Program.

 

Toronto is one of the principal destinations in Canada where individuals are being trafficked and sexually exploited. On any given night, there are approximately 2,000 homeless youth in Toronto vulnerable to being trafficked. To address this concern, the City in partnership with Covenant House Toronto applied to the Province to undertake new initiatives to provide supports, transitional housing and rent supplements for eligible women and girls who are survivors of sexual exploitation and human trafficking.

 

The Ministry of Community and Social Services has confirmed Toronto’s Community Supports Fund allocation of $885,000 to the City to support Covenant House in providing support services for individuals being trafficked. The City also applied for $885,000 in capital funds to provide transitional housing and $297,000 to provide rent supplement support for women who are survivors of sexual exploitation and human trafficking. An announcement with respect to the capital and rent supplement funding is anticipated shortly.

 

The City Anti-Human Trafficking Working Group, comprised of 21 City services, will continue to collaborate with other orders of government and several community partners to identify ways to strengthen the protection of its residents and communities from human traffickers and to determine ways how City staff can effectively respond to the needs of trafficked persons.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 14, 2017) Report from the Director Affordable Housing Office, the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration and the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration on New Supports and Housing for Survivors of Human Trafficking
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109141.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(December 1, 2017) Letter from Bruce Rivers, Executive Director, Covenant House (CC.Supp.EX29.15.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74309.pdf)


EX29.16

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:10, 17, 36 

Funding Allocations to Support 57 Affordable Ownership Homes
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve allocation up to $625,000 from the Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing (XR2116) for up to 25 down payment assistance loans of $25,000 each, to eligible purchasers of housing to be developed on the property currently known as 4 and 6 Tippett Road, under the terms of the City's Home Ownership Assistance Program.

 

2.  City Council approve allocation up to $300,000 from the Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing (XR2116) for up to 12 down payment assistance loans of $25,000 each, to eligible purchasers of housing to be developed on the property currently known as 80 Dale Avenue, under the terms of the City's Home Ownership Assistance Program.

 

3.  City Council approve allocation up to $500,000 from the Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing (XR2116) for up to 20 down payment assistance loans of $25,000 each, to eligible purchasers of housing to be developed on the property currently known as 383-425 Old Weston Road, under the terms of the City's Home Ownership Assistance Program.

 

4.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office, to negotiate, enter into and execute, on behalf of the City, all affordable housing funding agreements, and any security, financing or other documents required with Malibu Investments Inc., or a related corporation, Habitat for Humanity Greater Toronto Area, or a related corporation, 80 Dale Avenue Ltd., or a related corporation and any other party deemed necessary to facilitate the funding detailed in this report, on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Director, Affordable Housing Office, in consultation with the Chief Financial Officer, and in a form approved by the City Solicitor.

 

5.  City Council grant authority to the City Solicitor to execute any documents required to postpone, confirm the status of, and discharge any City security documents registered as required by normal business practices.

 

6.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office to designate the President, or other position of 80 Dale Avenue Ltd. and the President of Malibu Investments Inc. to execute on behalf of the City the loan agreements with eligible purchasers.

 

7.  City Council authorize the City to enter into an agreement with Habitat for Humanity Greater Toronto Area, Build Toronto, Glenspring Developments Inc., and any other party deemed necessary, to secure the purchase of a prepared block of land on which Habitat intends to build up to 20 homes (the "Habitat Property").

 

8.  City Council authorize the City to be a party to the agreement of purchase and sale contemplated to be entered into for the Habitat Property as a contingent transferee, in order to ensure the benefit of the Habitat Property is secured for the intended purposes, in the event Habitat for Humanity Greater Toronto Area or its assignee is not able to complete the transactions.

 

9.  City Council authorize the City to assign its interests in the Habitat Property to another not for profit housing provider, chosen by the Director, Affordable Housing Office, if Habitat is unable to complete the transaction, to give effect to the intended purpose of the Habitat Property as affordable housing, or to an arm's length purchaser at fair market value if no agreement can be made with a suitable not for profit, on terms and conditions determined by the Director, Affordable Housing Office and in a form approved by the City Solicitor prior to the closing date with Glenspring Developments Inc., with the intention that there are no financial consequences to the City having been a party to the agreements of purchase and sale for the Habitat Property.

 

10.  City Council authorize the net proceeds of the assignment of the agreement of purchase and sale for the Habitat Property at fair market value be paid to the Capital Revolving Reserve Fund for Affordable Housing (XR1058) after payment of all expenses incurred in making the assignment of any Habitat Property.

 

11.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office to negotiate and execute on behalf of the City, the agreement referred to Recommendation 7 above as well as any documents, agreements, or security required to give effect to Council's decision on terms and conditions determined by the Director, Affordable Housing Office and in a form approved by the City Solicitor.

 

12.  City Council authorize and direct the City Solicitor to execute the agreements of purchase and sale for the Habitat Property, together with any documents or agreement relating to the release of the City's interest to Habitat, an assignment or a re-sale transaction that may occur as a result of entering into that agreement, or to amend and to waive any terms and conditions on behalf of the City, on such terms as the City Solicitor considers reasonable.

Origin
(November 14, 2017) Report from the Director, Affordable Housing Office
Summary

This report recommends affordable home ownership program funding for up to 57 new homes to be built by non-profit and private sector developers at two Build Toronto sites and one private site in various locations in the City:

 

 

Address

Ward

Proponent

Number of Affordable Homes

1)

4 and 6 Tippett Road

10 York Centre

Malibu Investments Inc.

25

2)

383-425 Old Weston Road

17 Davenport

Habitat for Humanity

20

3)

80 Dale Avenue

36 Scarborough Southwest

80 Dale Avenue Ltd.

12

Total

57

 

The affordable housing plans for the Build Toronto sites were developed in collaboration with Build Toronto and the respective developers who will be acquiring the properties from Build Toronto. The affordable housing plan for 4 and 6 Tippett Road was developed in collaboration with the developer under the policies in the Tippett Road Area Regeneration Study.

 

Financial contributions for the 57 affordable new homes will take the form of down payment assistance loans to assist eligible purchasers moving from rental housing into homeownership. The loans will be funded from the federal/provincial Investment in Affordable Housing Program, the City’s Home Ownership Assistance Program using Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing funds, and the developers.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 14, 2017) Report from the Director, Affordable Housing Office on Funding Allocations to Support 57 Affordable Ownership Homes
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109140.pdf)


16a Funding Allocations to Support 57 Affordable Ownership Homes
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve allocation up to $625,000 from the Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing (XR2116) for up to 25 down payment assistance loans of $25,000 each, to eligible purchasers of housing to be developed on the property currently known as 4 and 6 Tippett Road, under the terms of the City's Home Ownership Assistance Program.

 

2.  City Council approve allocation up to $300,000 from the Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing (XR2116) for up to 12 down payment assistance loans of $25,000 each, to eligible purchasers of housing to be developed on the property currently known as 80 Dale Avenue, under the terms of the City's Home Ownership Assistance Program.

 

3. City Council approve allocation up to $500,000 from the Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing (XR2116) for up to 20 down payment assistance loans of $25,000 each, to eligible purchasers of housing to be developed on the property currently known as 383-425 Old Weston Road, under the terms of the City's Home Ownership Assistance Program.

 

4.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office, to negotiate, enter into and execute, on behalf of the City, all affordable housing funding agreements, and any security, financing or other documents required with Malibu Investments Incorporated, or a related corporation, Habitat for Humanity Greater Toronto Area, or a related corporation, 80 Dale Avenue Limited, or a related corporation and any other party deemed necessary to facilitate the funding detailed in this report, on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Director, Affordable Housing Office, in consultation with the Chief Financial Officer, and in a form approved by the City Solicitor.

 

5.  City Council grant authority to the City Solicitor to execute any documents required to postpone, confirm the status of, and discharge any City security documents registered as required by normal business practices.

 

6.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office to designate the President, or other position of 80 Dale Avenue Limited and the President of Malibu Investments Incorporated to execute on behalf of the City the loan agreements with eligible purchasers.

 

7.  City Council authorize the City to enter into an agreement with Habitat for Humanity Greater Toronto Area, Build Toronto, Glenspring Developments Incorporated, and any other party deemed necessary, to secure the purchase of a prepared block of land on which Habitat intends to build up to 20 homes (the "Habitat Property").

 

8.  City Council authorize the City to be a party to the agreement of purchase and sale contemplated to be entered into for the Habitat Property as a contingent transferee, in order to ensure the benefit of the Habitat Property is secured for the intended purposes, in the event Habitat for Humanity Greater Toronto Area or its assignee is not able to complete the transactions.

 

9.  City Council authorize the City to assign its interests in the Habitat Property to another not for profit housing provider, chosen by the Director, Affordable Housing Office, if Habitat is unable to complete the transaction, to give effect to the intended purpose of the Habitat Property as affordable housing, or to an arm's length purchaser at fair market value if no agreement can be made with a suitable not for profit, on terms and conditions determined by the Director, Affordable Housing Office and in a form approved by the City Solicitor prior to the closing date with Glenspring Developments Incorporated, with the intention that there are no financial consequences to the City having been a party to the agreements of purchase and sale for the Habitat Property.

 

10.  City Council authorize the net proceeds of the assignment of the agreement of purchase and sale for the Habitat Property at fair market value be paid to the Capital Revolving Reserve Fund for Affordable Housing (XR1058) after payment of all expenses incurred in making the assignment of any Habitat Property.

 

11.  City Council authorize the Director, Affordable Housing Office to negotiate and execute on behalf of the City, the agreement referred to Recommendation 7 above as well as any documents, agreements, or security required to give effect to Council's decision on terms and conditions determined by the Director, Affordable Housing Office and in a form approved by the City Solicitor.

 

12.  City Council authorize and direct the City Solicitor to execute the agreements of purchase and sale for the Habitat Property, together with any documents or agreement relating to the release of the City's interest to Habitat, an assignment or a re-sale transaction that may occur as a result of entering into that agreement, or to amend and to waive any terms and conditions on behalf of the City, on such terms as the City Solicitor considers reasonable.

Origin
(November 24, 2017) Report from the Director, Affordable Housing Office
Summary

This report recommends affordable home ownership program funding for up to 57 new homes to be built by non-profit and private sector developers at two Build Toronto sites and one private site in various locations in the City:

 

 

Address

Ward

Proponent

Number of Affordable Homes

1)

4 and 6 Tippett Road

10 York Centre

Malibu Investments Incorporated

25

2)

383-425 Old Weston Road

17 Davenport

Habitat for Humanity

20

3)

80 Dale Avenue

36 Scarborough Southwest

80 Dale Avenue Limited

12

Total

57

 

The affordable housing plans for the Build Toronto sites were developed in collaboration with Build Toronto and the respective developers who will be acquiring the properties from Build Toronto. The affordable housing plan for 4 and 6 Tippett Road was developed in collaboration with the developer under the policies in the Tippett Road Area Regeneration Study.

 

Financial contributions for the 57 affordable new homes will take the form of down payment assistance loans to assist eligible purchasers moving from rental housing into

home ownership. The loans will be funded from the federal/provincial Investment in Affordable Housing Program, the City’s Home Ownership Assistance Program using Development Charges Reserve Fund for Subsidized Housing funds, and the developers.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 24, 2017) Report from the Director, Affordable Housing Office on Funding Allocations to Support 57 Affordable Ownership Homes
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109346.pdf)


EX29.17

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Creation of a New Property Tax Class for Creative Co-Location Facilities
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the policy objectives and key eligibility criteria for the creation of a new property class for Creative Co-Location Facilities, as outlined in Appendix A to the report (November 20, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A.

 

2.  City Council request the Province to create a new property tax class for Creative Co-Location Facilities based on the policy objectives and key eligibility criteria set out in this report and that such property class be created as a property class for which municipalities be permitted to establish more detailed local criteria and property-specific by-laws, effective for the 2018 taxation year retroactive to January 1, 2018, and further, the Minister of Finance be requested to allow municipalities to set the tax rate for this new Property Tax Class.

 

3.  City Council direct the Acting Chief Financial Officer to include, as part of the 2018 tax rate and tax ratio setting process, the Creative Co-Location Facilities tax class, subject to the necessary regulations being approved and filed by the Province before such provision takes effect, with a report to Executive Committee at its meeting of February 6, 2018 as part of the "2018 Tax Rates and Related Matters" report.

 

4.  City Council direct the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, in consultation with the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the City Solicitor, to establish detailed eligibility criteria for inclusion of properties in the proposed Creative Co-Location Facilities tax class, together with a process to approve inclusion of such properties in this tax class, and a process to address appeals related to the City's eligibility criteria, with a report to Executive Committee at its meeting of February 6, 2018.

Origin
(November 20, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A
Summary

The most recent Provincial property reassessment has resulted in significant assessment increases for many property owners.  Some of these large increases were due to incorrect assessments (e.g. 401 Richmond Street West, downtown Yonge Street retail), which assessments have since been significantly reduced by the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation (MPAC).

 

Rapidly increasing land values resulting in significant property tax increases is a city-wide issue facing many properties beyond arts and culture facilities.  Similar concerns have been raised respecting organic food growers/retailers (Kensington Market), music venues, and main street retail on a broader scale (e.g. along the Eglinton corridor). 

 

For this reason, staff will be coming forward with potential options for mitigating tax increases which could include the re-instatement of the tax increase capping protection program for those properties in the commercial, industrial and multi-residential property classes that have previously reached their full Current Value Assessment (CVA) level of taxation and are no longer protected from large re-assessment related tax increases. This proposed policy option together with others will be reported to Executive Committee at its meeting of February 6, 2018, through the "2018 Tax Rates and Related Matters" report to be considered concurrently with the City's 2018 Capital and Operating Budgets.

 

Notwithstanding this, City Council has previously requested the Province to explore opportunities to support not-for-profit arts and culture organizations and incubators, including through property assessment tools.  The Ontario Minister of Finance has most recently extended his willingness to work with the City to establish a new property class for arts and culture facilities.

 

To seize on this opportunity, this report presents the City's policy objectives and proposed key eligibility criteria for the recommended new property class for Council approval as a first and required step in this process.  Upon receipt of this formal submission, Ministry staff will work with City staff in developing a regulatory framework for the creation of this class.  If adopted by the Province, the regulatory framework will provide flexibility for the City to design its own eligibility criteria beyond the broad parameters established by the Province.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 20, 2017) Report and Appendix A from the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A on Creation of a New Property Tax Class for Creative Co-Location Facilities
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109147.pdf)

Appendix B - Minister of Finance Letter to Mayor Tory
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109286.pdf)

Appendix B - Part 2 - Minister of Finance Letter to Mayor Tory
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109263.pdf)

Communications (Committee)
(November 24, 2017) Letter from Marc Glassman, on behalf of the Steering Committee at 401 Richmond Street West (EX.Supp.EX29.17.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74085.pdf)

(November 27, 2017) Letter from Tim Jones, CEO, ARTSCAPE (EX.Supp.EX29.17.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74103.pdf)


EX29.18

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Water and 2018 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees
Second Item on Thursday, December 7th

Bill 1397 has been submitted on this Item.
Communication EX29.18.2 has been submitted on this Item.
Public Notice Given
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council consider the report (October 27, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the General Manager, Toronto Water concurrently with the 2018-2027 Toronto Water Capital Plan and the 2018 Toronto Water Operating Budget.

 

Rates and Fees

 

2.  City Council adopt:

 

a.  Effective January 1, 2018, the combined water and wastewater consumption rates charged to metered consumers as shown below and in Appendix B attached to the report (October 27, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the General Manager, Toronto Water; 

 

Annual Consumption

Paid on or before the due date, $/m3

Paid after the due date, $/m3

Block 1 - All consumers of water, including the first 5,000 cubic metres per year consumed by Industrial users ("Block 1 rate")

3.8036

4.0037

Block 2 - Industrial process – use water consumption over 5,000 cubic metres per year, representing a 30% reduction from the Block 1 Rate ("Block 2 rate")

2.6623

2.8024

 

b.  Effective January 1, 2018, an increase of 5 percent to the water and wastewater consumption rates charged to flat rate consumers, as set out in Appendix B to the report (October 27, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the General Manager, Toronto Water;

 

c.  Effective January 1, 2018, the water and wastewater service fees, as set out in Appendix C to the report (October 27, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the General Manager, Toronto Water; and

 

d.  Effective January 1, 2018, the water rebate for eligible low-income seniors and low-income disabled persons be set at a rate of $1.1410/m3, representing a 30 percent reduction from the Block 1 rate (paid on or before the due date).

 

3.  City Council direct that all the rates, fees and charges set out in Appendices B and C to the report (October 27, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the General Manager, Toronto Water, and the water rate rebate, adopted by Council in recommendation 2 above, continue in full force and effect until such time as they are amended or repealed by Council.

 

4.  City Council authorize that the necessary amendments be made to Municipal Code Chapter 441 - Fees and Charges, Municipal Code Chapter 849 - Water and Sewage Services and Utility Bill, and Municipal Code Chapter 681 - Sewers, and any other necessary Municipal Code Chapters as may be required, to give effect to these Recommendations.

 

5.  City Council grant authority to the City Solicitor to introduce any necessary Bills required to implement these recommendations, subject to any necessary refinements, including stylistic, format and organization, as may be identified by the City Solicitor, the Acting Chief Financial Officer and General Manager, Toronto Water.

 

6.  City Council authorize and direct the appropriate City officials to take the necessary actions to give effect thereto.

 

Capital Budget

 

7.  City Council approve the 2018 Recommended Capital Budget for Toronto Water with a total project cost of $1.842 billion, and 2018 cash flow of $ 964.089 million and future year commitments of $ 5.157 billion comprised of the following:

 

a.  New Cash Flow Funds for:

 

i.  335 new / change in scope sub-projects with a 2018 total project cost of $1.842 billion that requires cash flow reduction of $146.796 million in 2018 and future year cash flow commitments of $433.544 million for 2019; $434.355 million for 2020; $370.877 million for 2021; $259.002 million for 2022; $182.901 million for 2023; $88.646 million for 2024; $40.737 million for 2025; $107.083 million for 2026; and $71.985 million for 2027;

 

ii.  286 previously approved sub-projects with a 2018 cash flow of $1.012 billion; and future year cash flow commitments of $811.796 million for 2019; $616.290 million for 2020; $442.761 million for 2021; $357.754 million for 2022; $320.691 million for 2023; $280.639 million for 2024; $244.423 million for 2025; and $93.968 million for 2026;

 

b.  2017 approved cash flow for 183 previously approved sub-projects with carry forward funding from 2017 into 2018 totalling $98.868 million.

 

8.  City Council approve the 2019 - 2027 Recommended Capital Plan for Toronto Water totalling $6.702 billion in project estimates, comprised of $202.994 million for 2019; $411.500 million for 2020; $558.996 million for 2021; $618.112 million for 2022; $795.058 million for 2023; $874.430 million for 2024; $992.793 million for 2025; $1.072 billion for 2026 and $1.176 billion in 2027.

 

9.  City Council consider the operating costs of $1.496 million net in 2018; $0.984 million net in 2019; $1.494 million net in 2020; $0.848 million net in 2021; $2.203 million net in 2022; $0.050 million net in 2023; and $1.0 million net in 2025, resulting from the approval of the 2018 Recommended Capital Budget for inclusion in the 2018 and future year operating budgets.

 

10.  City Council approve 3 new temporary capital positions for the delivery of 2018 capital projects and that the duration for each temporary position not exceed the life and funding of its respective projects / sub-projects.

 

11.  All sub-projects with third party financing be approved conditionally, subject to the receipt of such financing in 2018 and if such funding is not forthcoming, their priority and funding be reassessed by City Council relative to other City-financed priorities and needs.

 

12.  City Council consider the 2018 - 2027 Recommended Capital Budget and Plan - Toronto Water concurrently with the report (October 27, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the General Manager, Toronto Water.

  

Operating Budget

 

13.  City Council approve the 2018 Recommended Operating Budget for Toronto Water  of $446.383 million gross, and $842.594 million net in capital-from-current contribution for the following services:

 

Service

Gross ($000s)

 

Net

($000s)

Water Treatment & Supply

190,610.2

 

374,813.4

Wastewater Collection & Treatment

225,396.5

 

493,356.1

Stormwater Management

30,376.4

 

(25,575.6)

Total Program Budget

446,383.2

 

842,593.9

 

14.  City Council approve the 2018 service levels for Toronto Water as outlined on pages 18, 21, and 24 of this report, and associated staff complement of  1,761.65 positions, comprising 56.35 capital positions and 1,705.3 operating positions.

 
15.  City Council consider the 2018 Staff Recommended Operating Budget - Toronto Water concurrently with the report (October 27, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the General Manager, Toronto Water.

Origin
(November 10, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

The Budget Committee submits its recommendations on the 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Water and 2018 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 10, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Water and 2018 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108980.pdf)

(October 27, 2017) Report and Appendix A from the Acting Chief Financial Officer and General Manager, Toronto Water on 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Water and 2018 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109172.pdf)

Appendix B - 2018 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109173.pdf)

Appendix C - 2018 Water and Wastewater Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109174.pdf)

(October 27, 2017) Public Notice - 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Water and Recommended 2018 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109175.pdf)

Public Notice - Appendix A - 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Water and Recommended 2017 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109176.pdf)

Public Notice - Appendix B - 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Water and Recommended 2017 Water and Wastewater Consumption Rates and Service Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109177.pdf)

(November 3, 2017) 2018 Staff Recommended Capital Budget Notes - Toronto Water
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109178.pdf)

(November 24, 2017) Revised Appendices 3, 4 and 5 to the 2018 Staff Recommended Capital Budget Notes - Toronto Water
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109383.pdf)

(November 3, 2017) 2018 Capital Budget Briefing Note #1 - Basement Flooding Protection Program - Program Status Update and Basement Flooding Protection Program Summary
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109179.pdf)

(November 3, 2017) 2018 Capital Budget Briefing Note #2 - Basement Flooding Protection Program - Project List: 2018 to 2022
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109200.pdf)

(November 21, 2017) 2018 Capital Budget Briefing Note #3 - Climate Change Strategies - Budget Summary
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109347.pdf)

(November 21, 2017) 2018 Capital Budget Briefing Note #4 - Options for expediting the Wet Weather Flow Master Plan Budget Summary
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109348.pdf)

(November 3, 2017) 2018 Staff Recommended Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Water
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109201.pdf)

(November 24, 2017) Revised 2018 Staff Recommended Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Water
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109385.pdf)

(November 27, 2017) 2018 Operating Budget Briefing Note #1 - Toronto Water - Stormwater Charge Initiative
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109456.pdf)

Communications (Committee)
(November 28, 2017) Submission from Derek Moran (EX.Supp.EX29.18.1)
Communications (City Council)
(December 5, 2017) Letter from Paul Scrivener, Director of External Affairs, Toronto Industry Network (CC.New.EX29.18.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74436.pdf)


EX29.19

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2018 Solid Waste Rates and Fees
Bill 1425 has been submitted on this Item.
Public Notice Given
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

Rates and Fees

 

1.  City Council adopt the Solid Waste Management Services Rates and Fees in 2018 as set out in Appendix A to the report (October 31, 2017) from the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and the Acting Chief Financial Officer, to become effective on January 1, 2018.

 

2.  City Council consider the report (October 31, 2017) from the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and the Acting Chief Financial Officer concurrently with the 2018 Recommended Capital Budget, 2018-2027 Recommended Capital Plan and the 2018 Recommended Operating Budget of the Solid Waste Management Services Division.

 

3.  City Council authorize that the necessary amendments be made to Municipal Code Chapter 441 - Fees and Charges, and any other necessary Municipal Code Chapters as may be required, to give effect to these Recommendations.

 

4.  City Council grant authority to the City Solicitor to introduce any necessary Bills required to implement these Recommendations, subject to any necessary refinements, including stylistic, format and organization, as may be identified by the City Solicitor, the Acting Chief Financial Officer and General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services.

 

5.  City Council direct that all the rates, fees and charges set out in Appendices A to the report (October 31, 2017) from the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and the Acting Chief Financial Officer, adopted by Council in Recommendation 1 above, continue in full force and effect until such time as they are amended or repealed by Council.

 

Capital Budget

 

6.  City Council approve the 2018 Recommended Capital Budget for Solid Waste Management Services with a total project cost of $56.857 million, and 2018 cash flow of $114.406 million and future year commitments of $149.404 million comprised of the following:


a.  New Cash Flow Funds for:


i.  36 new / change in scope sub-projects with a 2018 total project cost of $56.857 million that requires cash flow of $8.516 million in 2018 and future year cash flow commitments of $9.597 million for 2019; $15.135 million for 2020; $5.195 million for 2021; $4.930 million for 2022; $3.561 million for 2023; $3.241 million for 2024; $3.241 million for 2025; $0.441 million for 2026 and $3 million for 2027;


ii.  25 previously approved sub-projects with a 2018 cash flow of $84.285 million; and future year cash flow commitments of $47.445 million for 2019; $18.022 million for 2020; $12.580 million for 2021; $14.001 million for 2022; $3.515 million for 2023; $1 million for 2024; $1million for 2025; and $3.5 million for 2026;


b.  2017 approved cash flow for 18 previously approved sub-projects with carry forward funding from 2017 into 2018 totalling $21.605 million.


7.  City Council approve the 2019 - 2027 Recommended Capital Plan for Solid Waste Management Services totalling $384.671 million in project estimates, comprised of $23.792 million for 2019; $28.801 million for 2020; $32.442 million for 2021; $39.853 million for 2022; $53.918 million for 2023; $48.932 million for 2024; $42.128 million for 2025; $54.237 million for 2026 and $60.568 million in 2027.


8.  City Council consider the operating costs of $2.044 million net in 2018; $(0.961) million net in 2019; $0.095 million net in 2020; $0.105 million net in 2021; $(0.019) million net in 2022; $(0.022) million for 2023; $(0.026) million for 2024; $(0.029) million for 2025; $0.046 million for 2026 and $0.046 million in 2027, resulting from the approval of the 2018 Recommended Capital Budget for inclusion in the 2018 and future year operating budgets.


9.  City Council approve 3 new temporary capital positions for the delivery of 2018 capital projects and that the duration for each temporary position not exceed the life and funding of its respective projects / sub-projects.


10.  City Council consider the 2018 - 2027 Recommended Capital Budget and Plan - Solid Waste Management Services concurrently with the report (October 31, 2017) from the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and the Acting Chief Financial Officer.

 

Operating Budget

 

11.  City Council approve the 2018 Recommended Operating Budget for Solid Waste Management Services of $382.163 million gross, $23.026 million capital contribution for the following services:

 

Service

Gross

($000s)

 

Net

($000s)

City Beautification

36,590.9

 

34,953.3

Residual Management

79,839.4

 

33,793.8

Solid Waste Collection & Transfer

119,910.7

 

(182,211.1)

Solid Waste Education & Enforcement

6,303.8

 

6,299.8

Solid Waste Processing & Transport

139,518.2

 

84,138.4

Total Program Budget

382,163.0

 

(23,025.8)

 

12.  City Council approve the 2018 service levels for Solid Waste Management Services as outlined on pages 15, 18, 21, 24, and 27 of this report, and associated staff complement of 1,116.74 positions, comprising 34.53 capital positions and 1,082.21 operating positions.


13.  City Council approve the fee changes for Solid Waste Management Services identified in Appendix 1, for inclusion in the Municipal Code Chapter 441 "Fees and Charges".


14.  City Council consider the 2018 Recommended Operating Budget - Solid Waste Management Services concurrently with the report (October 31, 2017) from the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and the Acting Chief Financial Officer.


15.  City Council direct that Solid Waste Management Services and the Financial Planning Division report to Budget Committee on a multi-year rate strategy for the 2019 Budget Process.

 

16.  City Council request the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, to include the escalating costs of utilities, water and solid waste fees and charges in the proposed economic development study Policies and Programs to support the City's retail areas.   

Origin
(November 10, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

The Budget Committee submits its recommendations on the 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2018 Solid Waste Rates and Fees.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 10, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2018 Solid Waste Rates and Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108971.pdf)

(October 31, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Solid Waste Management Services and the Acting Chief Financial Officer on 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2018 Solid Waste Rates and Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109203.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Appendix A - Recommended 2018 Solid Waste Management Services Rates and Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109204.pdf)

(October 27, 2017) Public Notice - 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2018 Solid Waste Rates
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109205.pdf)

(October 27, 2017) Public Notice - Appendix A - Recommended 2018 Solid Waste Rates and Fees
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109206.pdf)

(November 3, 2017) 2018 Staff Recommended Capital Budget Notes - Solid Waste Management Services
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109207.pdf)

(November 24, 2017) Revised 2018 Staff Recommended Capital Budget Notes - Solid Waste Management Services
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109386.pdf)

(November 20, 2017) REVISED 2018 Staff Recommended Operating Budget Notes - Solid Waste Management Services
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109208.pdf)

(November 27, 2017) 2018 Capital Budget Briefing Note #5 - Long Term Waste Management Strategy - Improving Multi-Residential and Organic Waste Diversion in 2018
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109453.pdf)


EX29.20

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Parking Authority
Fourth Item on Thursday, December 7th
Public Notice Given
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

Capital Budget

 

1.  City Council approve the 2018 Recommended Capital Budget for Toronto Parking Authority with a total project cost of $78.501 million, and 2018 cash flow of $57.241 million and future year commitments of $21.260 million comprised of the following:


a.  New Cash Flow Funds for:


i.  34 new / change in scope sub-projects with a 2018 total project cost of $78.501 million that requires cash flow of $57.241 million in 2018 and future year cash flow commitment of $21.260 million for 2019;

 

b.  2017 approved cash flow for 28 previously approved sub-projects with carry forward funding from 2017 into 2018 totalling $11.265 million.


2.  City Council approve the 2019 - 2027 Recommended Capital Plan for Toronto Parking Authority totalling $433.869 million in project estimates, comprised of $96.579 million for 2019; $87.1 million for 2020; $57.450 million for 2021; $61.9 million for 2022; $35.7 million for 2023; $46.6 million for 2024; $29.5 million for 2025; $32.8 million for 2026, and $7.5 million in 2027.


3.  City Council consider the operating savings of $0.866 million net in 2019; $1.664 million net in 2020; $1.570 million net in 2021; $1.0 million net in 2022; $1.085 million net in 2023; 0.581 million net in 2024, $0.791 million net in 2025; $0.462 million net in 2026; and $0.525 million net in 2027 resulting from the approval of the 2018 Recommended Capital Budget for inclusion in the 2018 and future year operating budgets.


4.  All sub-projects with third party financing be approved conditionally, subject to the receipt of such financing in 2018 and if such funding is not forthcoming, their priority and funding be reassessed by City Council relative to other City-financed priorities and needs.

 

Operating Budget

 

5.  City Council approve the 2018 Recommended Operating Budget for Toronto Parking Authority of $99.662 million gross, and ($66.538 million net) for the following services:

 

Service

Gross

($000s)

 

Net

($000s)

Off-Street Parking

81,695.6

 

(20,661.4)

On-Street parking

12,446.0

 

(46,287.3)

Bike Share

5,520.4

 

410.4

Total Program Budget

99,662.1

 

(66,538.2)

 

6.  City Council approve the 2018 service levels for Toronto Parking Authority as outlined on pages 15, 17, and 19 of the 2018 Staff Recommended Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Parking Authority, and associated staff complement of 328.5 operating positions.
 

7.  City Council direct the Acting President, Toronto Parking Authority to report back to the Executive Committee, through the Budget Committee, with a comprehensive strategy to address the funding for the Bike Share Program on a longer term basis, to inform the 2019 and future year Budget processes by March 31, 2018.

Origin
(November 10, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

The Budget Committee submits its recommendations on the 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Parking Authority.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 10, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on 2018 Rate Supported Budgets - Toronto Parking Authority
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108973.pdf)

(November 9, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Transportation Services on Revenue Impacts of Community Councils on Toronto Parking Authority
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109209.pdf)

(October 27, 2017) Public Notice - 2018 Toronto Parking Authority Rates Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 441, Fees and Charges
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109210.pdf)

(November 3, 2017) 2018 Staff Recommended Capital Budget Notes - Toronto Parking Authority
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109211.pdf)

(November 24, 2017) Revised 2018 Staff Recommended Capital Budget Notes - Toronto Parking Authority
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109388.pdf)

(November 3, 2017) 2018 Staff Recommended Operating Budget Notes - Toronto Parking Authority
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109212.pdf)


EX29.21

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

2018 Interim Estimates
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the 2018 Interim Operating Estimates totalling $2.658 billion as detailed by City Program and Agency in Appendix 1 to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer.

 

2.  City Council approve the 2018 Interim Capital Estimates totalling $1.102 billion in gross expenditures and $394.588 million in debt funding as detailed by City Program and Agency in Appendix 2 to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer, with the balance financed by Provincial and Federal funding of $235.708 million; Reserve/Reserve Funds funding of $218.762 million; Development Charges funding of $81.783 million and Third Party and Other funding of $171.357 million.

Origin
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer
Summary

The 2018 Tax supported Operating and Capital Budgets are scheduled for Council approval on February 12 and 13, 2018. The purpose of this report is to establish the 2018 Interim Operating and Capital Estimates in order to enable City Programs and Agencies to have the necessary spending authority to carry out their ongoing operations and to continue work on previously approved capital projects until the 2018 Operating and Capital Budgets are approved by City Council.

 

The 2018 Tax Supported Interim Operating Estimates are $2.658 billion gross and require cash outflow funding of $2.269 billion. The 2018 Tax Supported Interim Capital Estimates total $1.102 billion and require debenture financing of $394.588 million.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 15, 2017) Report and Appendices 1 and 2 from the Acting Chief Financial Officer on 2018 Interim Estimates
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109104.pdf)


EX29.22

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Property Taxes - 2018 Interim Levy By-Law
Bill 1376 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1. City Council authorize that the 2018 interim levy for all property classes be based on 50 percent of the total 2017 taxes billed for each property, adjusted, as necessary, to reflect any additional taxes added to the previous year's taxes as a result of assessment added to the tax roll.

 

2. City Council authorize that the interim levy apply to assessments added to the tax roll for 2017 that were not on the assessment roll when the by-law was passed.

 

3. City Council authorize that:

 

a. the interim bill payment due dates for property tax accounts paid on the eleven (11) instalment pre-authorized tax payment plan be: February 15, March 15, April 16, May 15, and June 15, 2018;

 

b. the interim bill payment due date for the two (2) instalment pre-authorized tax payment plan be March 1, 2018; and

 

c. the interim bill payment due dates for all other property tax accounts on the regular instalment option or on the six (6) instalment pre-authorized tax payment plan be: March 1, April 3, and May 1, 2018.

 

4. City Council grant authority to introduce the necessary bill in Council on December 5, 6, and 7, 2017, providing for the levying and collection of the 2018 interim taxes prior to the adoption of the estimates for 2018, which by-law, when enacted, will be effective as of January 1, 2018.

Origin
(November 6, 2017) Report from the Treasurer
Summary

This report requests Council authority to adopt the necessary by-law to levy interim property taxes for all property classes for 2018 and to prescribe applicable interim bill payment due dates. The 2018 interim levy will raise approximately $2.07 billion for City purposes, and will provide for the cash requirements of the City until such time as the 2018 Operating Budget and 2018 final property tax levy are approved by Council.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 6, 2017) Report from the Treasurer on Property Taxes - 2018 Interim Levy By-Law
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108774.pdf)


EX29.23

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Administrative Amendments to Reserve Fund Accounts - 2017
Bill 1378 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council adopt the revised purpose and the revised Criteria Sheet for the 'Tax Rate Stabilization Reserve' account, as provided in Appendix 1 to the report (November 15, 2017) from the Interim Chief Financial Officer, and amend Schedule 3 of Chapter 227 to reflect the revised purpose.

 

2.  City Council direct the following accounts, which have zero balances, be closed and deleted from the Schedules to Chapter 227 as set out in the table to follow.

 

Zero Balance Reserve/Reserve Fund Accounts

Reserve Accounts

Beneficial Program

Schedule

Fort York (XQ4207)

Historic House & Gardens (XQ4210)

Montgomery's Inn (XQ4215)

Todmorden Mills (XQ4214)

York Museum (XR4218)

Zion Schoolhouse (XQ4217)

(all in the Museum Group of Accounts)

Economic Development and Culture

5

 

Culture Funding (XR1726)

 

Office of the Acting Chief Financial Officer

 

7

 

Parkland Acquisition - New Development (East York) (XR2034)

 

Parks, Forestry and Recreation

 

10

 

3.  City Council authorize the transfer of the balances of the following pre-2004 Parkland Acquisition/Development Reserve Fund Accounts in column 1 to the corresponding 2004 Parkland Acquisition/Development Reserve Fund accounts in column 2 and direct the accounts in column 1 to be closed and deleted from Schedule 10 of Chapter 227.

 

Parkland Acquisition Account Transfers

 

From (column 1)

To (column 2)

Parkland Acquisition - Land Acquisition (East York) (XR2033)

Parkland Acquisition - South District Local Land (XR2208)

Parkland Acquisition - Land Acquisition (Etobicoke) (XR2037)

Parkland Acquisition - West District Local Land (XR2202)

Parkland Acquisition - New Development (Etobicoke)  (XR2038)

Parkland Acquisition - West District Local Development (XR2203)

Parkland Acquisition - New Development (Scarborough) (XR2050)

Parkland Acquisition - East District Local Development (XR2205)

Parkland Acquisition - Pre-1999 (Etobicoke) (XR2002)

Parkland Acquisition - West District Local Land (XR2202)

 

4.  City Council authorize the transfer of the balances of the following Donations Reserve Accounts within the Museum Account Group in column 1 to the corresponding Museum - General Account (column 2) within the same Museum Account Group, and direct the accounts in column 1 be closed and deleted from Schedule 5 of Chapter 227.

 

Museum Group Account Transfers

From (column 1)

To (column 2)

Museum Donation - Scarborough Historical Museum (XQ4004)

Museum Donation - General (XQ4219)

Museum Donation - Gibson House (XQ4216)

Museum Donation - General (XQ4219)

Museum Donation - MacKenzie House (XQ4211)

Museum Donation - General (XQ4219)

Museum Donation - Colborne Lodge (XQ4208)

Museum Donation - General (XQ4219)

 

5.  City Council authorize the necessary amendments to Chapter 227 in accordance with Recommendations 1 to 4 and direct the City Solicitor to introduce any necessary bills to give effect to the recommendations of the report (November 15, 2017) from the Interim Chief Financial Officer.

Origin
(November 15, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer
Summary

This report seeks Council approval to implement a number of administrative amendments to City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 227, Reserves and Reserve Funds ("Chapter 227").  These amendments include refining the criteria of an existing account and deleting accounts which are no longer required.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 15, 2017) Report and Appendix 1 from the Acting Chief Financial Officer on Administrative Amendments to Reserve Fund Accounts - 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109142.pdf)


EX29.24

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Capital Variance Report for the Nine Month Period Ended September 30, 2017
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve in-year budget adjustments to the 2017-2026 Approved Capital Budget and Plan that result in no incremental impact on debt funding.

 

2.  City Council receive for information the list of 180 completed capital projects/sub-projects to be closed as detailed in Appendix 2 to the report (November 20, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer, that results in a total combined project budget savings of $22.069 million.

Origin
(November 20, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer
Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide City Council with the City of Toronto capital spending for the nine month period ended September 30, 2017, as well as projected actual expenditures to December 31, 2017. Furthermore, this report seeks Council's approval for in-year budget adjustments to the 2017 Approved Capital Budget.

 

The report also details the 180 completed capital projects with a combined budget of $206.066 million that are ready to be closed. They have been completed under budget, realizing savings of $22.208 million. The permanent underspending which includes $6.603 million in debt funding, $12.171 million in reserves/reserve funds funding, $2.025 million in Capital from Current funding, $0.311 million in Development Charges funding and $1.098 million in other Revenue will be returned to their original funding sources.

 

Table 1: Nine months and Year-End Projected Spending Rate

 

 

2017 Approved Capital Budget

Actual Expenditures - January to September

Actual Expenditures - January to September

Projected Actual Expenditures at Year-End

Projected Actual Expenditures at Year-End

   

($M)

%

($M)

%

Tax Supported

4,1412

1,209.9

29.2%

2,827.4

68.3%

Rate Supported Programs:

1,131.9

471.8

41.7%

853.5

75.4%

TOTAL

5,273.1

1,681.8

31.9%

3,680.8

69.8%

The spending pattern for the first nine months is typically within 40 percent of the total Council Approved Capital Budget. As detailed by City Program and Agency in Appendix 1, total expenditures for the first nine months of 2017 is $1.682 billion or 31.9 percent of the 2017 Council Approved Budget, which is slightly lower than prior years, as compared to 33.2 percent in the third quarter of 2016, 37.0 percent in the third quarter of 2015 and 35.7 percent in the third quarter of 2014. 

The projected expenditure to year-end is expected to reach $3.681 billion or 69.8 percent of the total 2017 Approved Capital Budget. 14 of the 33 City Programs and Agencies have year-end projected spending rate in excess of 70 percent: Tax Supported Programs project a spending rate of 68.3 percent while Rate Supported Programs project spending rate of 75.4 percent by year-end. 

Figure 1 below compares the actual year-end spending rate from 2012 to 2016 average with the projected year-end spending rate for 2017. 

Figure 1: 2012 - 2017 Capital Spending Rate

 

(See Figure 1 titled 2012 - 2017 Capital Spending Rate

in the Summary Section of the report dated November 20, 2017

from the Acting Chief Financial Officer)

 

The 2017 Capital Budget of $5.273 billion represents the highest Capital Budget the City has had for its Tax and Rate Supported Programs. This level of funding reflects an Approved Capital Budget of $3.708 billion plus a combined 2016 carry forward funding and 2017 in-year budget adjustments of $1.565 billion. As a result of increased Capital Budgets, the spending as a percentage of the Budget is proportionally lower. 

The projected year-end spending rates are based on the submissions from the City Operation Divisions and Agencies, and as such, we have accordingly relied on the advice in preparing this report. Both the Approved Capital Budget (including carry forward funding) and actual capital expenditures have been steadily trending upwards over the last 5 years: from $2.400 billion in 2012 to $2.855 billion in 2016 and projected to reach $3.681 billion by the end of 2017. While the projected year-end spending rate of 69.8 percent for 2017 is consistent with the year-end spending rate projected at the third quarter in prior years, it is higher compared to actual year-end spending rate of 60.2 percent for 2016 and 68.3 percent for 2015 as well as past five years' average spending rate of 62.4 percent.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 20, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer on Capital Variance Report for the Nine Month Period Ended September 30, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109280.pdf)

Appendices 1-4
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109281.pdf)

Appendix 5 - Capital Dashboard for Programs/Agencies
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109282.pdf)


24a Capital Variance Report for the Nine Month Period Ended September 30, 2017
Origin
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide City Council with the City of Toronto capital spending for the nine month period ended September 30, 2017, as well as projected actual expenditures to December 31, 2017. Furthermore, this report seeks Council's approval for in-year budget adjustments to the 2017 Approved Capital Budget.

 

The report also details the 180 completed capital projects with a combined budget of $206.066 million that are ready to be closed. They have been completed under budget, realizing savings of $22.208 million. The permanent underspending which includes $6.603 million in debt funding, $12.171 million in reserves/reserve funds funding, $2.025 million in Capital from Current funding, $0.311 million in Development Charges funding and $1.098 million in other Revenue will be returned to their original funding sources.

 

Table 1: Nine months and Year-End Projected Spending Rate

 

 

2017 Approved Capital Budget

Actual Expenditures - January to September

Actual Expenditures - January to September

Projected Actual Expenditures at Year-End

Projected Actual Expenditures at Year-End

   

($M)

%

($M)

%

Tax Supported

4,1412

1,209.9

29.2%

2,827.4

68.3%

Rate Supported Programs:

1,131.9

471.8

41.7%

853.5

75.4%

TOTAL

5,273.1

1,681.8

31.9%

3,680.8

69.8%

The spending pattern for the first nine months is typically within 40 percent of the total Council Approved Capital Budget. As detailed by City Program and Agency in Appendix 1, total expenditures for the first nine months of 2017 is $1.682 billion or 31.9 percent of the 2017 Council Approved Budget, which is slightly lower than prior years, as compared to 33.2 percent in the third quarter of 2016, 37.0 percent in the third quarter of 2015 and 35.7 percent in the third quarter of 2014. 

The projected expenditure to year-end is expected to reach $3.681 billion or 69.8 percent of the total 2017 Approved Capital Budget. 14 of the 33 City Programs and Agencies have year-end projected spending rate in excess of 70 percent: Tax Supported Programs project a spending rate of 68.3 percent while Rate Supported Programs project spending rate of 75.4 percent by year-end. 

Figure 1 below compares the actual year-end spending rate from 2012 to 2016 average with the projected year-end spending rate for 2017. 

Figure 1: 2012 - 2017 Capital Spending Rate

 

(See Figure 1 titled 2012 - 2017 Capital Spending Rate

in the Summary Section of the report dated November 20, 2017

from the Acting Chief Financial Officer)

 

The 2017 Capital Budget of $5.273 billion represents the highest Capital Budget the City has had for its Tax and Rate Supported Programs. This level of funding reflects an Approved Capital Budget of $3.708 billion plus a combined 2016 carry forward funding and 2017 in-year budget adjustments of $1.565 billion. As a result of increased Capital Budgets, the spending as a percentage of the Budget is proportionally lower. 

The projected year-end spending rates are based on the submissions from the City Operation Divisions and Agencies, and as such, we have accordingly relied on the advice in preparing this report. Both the Approved Capital Budget (including carry forward funding) and actual capital expenditures have been steadily trending upwards over the last 5 years: from $2.400 billion in 2012 to $2.855 billion in 2016 and projected to reach $3.681 billion by the end of 2017. While the projected year-end spending rate of 69.8 percent for 2017 is consistent with the year-end spending rate projected at Q3 in prior years, it is higher compared to actual year-end spending rate of 60.2 percent for 2016 and 68.3 percent for 2015 as well as past five years' average spending rate of 62.4 percent.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on Capital Variance Report for the Nine Month Period Ended September 30, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109448.pdf)


EX29.25

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Operating Variance Report for the Nine Month Period Ended September 30, 2017
The Interim Chief Financial Officer has submitted a supplementary report on this Item (EX29.25b with recommendations)
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the budget adjustments detailed in Appendix F to the report (November 20, 2017) from the Acting Chief Financial Officer to amend the 2017 Approved Operating Budget between Programs that have no impact to the 2017 Approved Net Operating Budget of the City.

 

2.  City Programs and Agencies projecting year-end over-spending continue to identify and undertake mitigation strategies to address projected year-end over-expenditures.

Origin
(November 20, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer
Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide City Council with the operating variance for the nine month period ended September 30, 2017 as well as projections to year-end. This report also requests City Council's approval for amendments to the 2017 Approved Operating Budget between Programs that have no impact on the City's 2017 Approved Net Operating Budget.

 

The following table summarizes the financial position of Tax Supported Operations as of the third fiscal quarter and projection at year-end:

 

Figure 1: Tax Supported Operating Net Variance Summary ($ Millions)

 

Variance

September 30, 2017

Over/(Under)

Projected Y/E 2017

Over/(Under)

$

%

$

%

Gross Expenditures

(181.4)

-2.4%

(193.4)

-1.8%

Revenues

66.7

1.4%

(51.6)

-0.8%

Net Expenditures

(248.1)

-8.3%

(141.8)

-3.5%

Less: Toronto Building

(16.8)

201.3%

(12.5)

117.0%

Less: Children's Services

(8.6)

12.9

(12.0)

14.9%

Net Expenditures (Excl. Toronto Building and Children's Services)

(222.8)

-7.6%

(117.3)

-3.0%

 

In accordance with the Building Code Act, the surplus from Toronto Building must be contributed to the Building Code Act Service Improvement Reserve Fund to create and maintain systems and processes which enable service delivery timelines and reporting requirements of the Province's Bill 124, Building Code Statute Law Amendment Act, and 2002 Legislation to be met.

 

It is important to note, Children's Services year-end under-expenditure of $12.000 million net is related to Provincial / Federal growth funding to provide 825 new child care subsidies to support growth as directed by City Council on July 4, 2017 (EX26.30). A corresponding in-year adjustment is included in the Appendix F of the report for a one-time contribution to the Child Care Expansion Reserve Fund.

 

Year-to-Date Spending Results:

 

As noted in Figure 1 above, for the nine month period ended September 30, 2017, Tax Supported Operations reported a favourable net variance of $248.103 million or 8.3 percent and are projecting a year-end surplus of $141.822 million or 3.5 percent.

 

The year-to-date net under-spending was primarily driven by:

 

- Over-achieved Municipal Land Transfer Tax revenue due to higher than anticipated real estate market activity ($93.809 million net).
 

- Under-expenditure by the Toronto Transit Commission of $80.356 million net primarily as a result of lower departmental material expenditures, labour costs, and accident claims of $67.755 million net within Conventional Service, and fewer customer journeys than planned within Wheel Trans of $12.601 million net.
 

- Under-spending by Transportation Services driven by lower contract costs and decreased salt usage in the winter maintenance program ($18.103 million net).
 

- Over-achieved revenue in Toronto Building primarily due to the increasing number of building permit applications ($16.792 million net).
 

- Increased revenue from Supplementary Taxes due to a change in the historical supplementary roll delivery date compared to plan ($15.936 million net).
 

Favourable variances in other Programs and Agencies are primarily due to under-spending in salaries and benefits as a result of vacant positions. The majority of the vacant positions are expected to be filled by year-end, while other new vacant positions may occur throughout the system. More detailed explanations at the Program / Agency level can be found in the complement section of this report.

 

Year-End Spending Projections:

 

Based on this current trend, the City is projecting a net favourable year-end variance of $141.822 million or 3.5 percent. The key drivers for the expected year-end net position are largely due to the following:

 

- Higher than budgeted Municipal Land Transfer Tax revenue as a result of higher than expected sales revenue ($85.000 million net).
 

- Toronto Transit Commission - Conventional Service's under-spending of $35.076 million net is mainly related to labour expenses, employee benefits, PRESTO fees, lower diesel fuel consumption, utilities, depreciation, which are partially offset by passenger revenue increase due to the current trend of customers switching from pass-based fare media to single-ride fare media, and not requiring the budgeted reserve draw of $14.000 million. While, Wheel - Trans Service favourable variance of $14.259 million net is attributed to fewer customer journeys than budgeted. As a whole, Toronto Transit Commission is projecting a favourable year-end variance of $49.335 million net.
 

Consistent with the City's financial management practices and policies, Programs and Agencies projecting an unfavourable year-end variance are required to identify and implement mitigation strategies where possible to address any projected shortfalls.

 

It is important to note that the City's projected year-end under-spending of $141.822 million is primarily attributed to the projected higher Municipal Land Transfer Tax revenues of $85.000 million. After isolating Toronto Building projected net revenue, Municipal Land Transfer Tax over-achieved revenue accounts for 66 percent of the total City's favourable variance for year-end.

 

Rate Supported Programs:

 

As noted in Figure 2 below, for the nine month period ended September 30, 2017, Rate Supported Operations reported a favourable net variance of $14.431 million or 34.3 percent and are projecting a year-end surplus of $2.886 million.

 

Figure 2: Rate Supported Net Variance Summary ($ Millions)

 

Rate Supported Programs

September 30, 2017

Projected Y/E 2017

Over/(Under)

Over/(Under)

Solid Waste Management Services

2.6

(1.3)

Toronto Parking Authority

0.3

0.7

Toronto Water

(17.4)

(2.2)

Total Variance

(14.4)

(2.9)

 

The key year-to-date net under-spending in Rate Supported Program was driven by:

 

The negative variance in Solid Waste Management Services of $2.628 million net or 30.4 percent is primarily due to over-spending on contracted services, inter-divisional charges for fleet maintenance, debt service charges as well as earlier than planned reserve contributions.
 

The negative revenue in Toronto Parking Authority of $0.306 million net or 0.7 percent is primarily due to lower than planned off-street parking revenues and loss of sponsorship revenue in the Bike Share Program.

 
The positive revenue in Toronto Water of $17.365 million net is primarily due to advance postings of sale of water and industrial waste agreement revenues, as well as an overall increase in the volume demand for new sewer service connections and private water agreements.
 

Complement:

 

Figure 3: 2017 Year-To-Date Vacancy Rate

 

Program/Agency

2017 Year-to-Date

Operating Vacancy %

Capital Vacancy %

Budgeted Gapping %

Operating* Vacancy Rate (After Gapping)

City Operations

3.8%

23.6%

2.4%

1.3%

Agencies

3.5%

19.3%

3.4%

0.1%

Corporate Accounts**

9.0%

0.0%

0.0%

9.0%

Total Levy Operations

3.7%

20.7%

2.9%

0.8%

Rate Supported Programs

7.7%

17.7%

3.0%

4.8%

Grand Total

3.9%

20.6%

2.9%

1.0%

 

*Vacancy after Gapping % is based on operating positions only.

**Corporate Accounts are largely driven by Parking Enforcement Unit vacancies.

 

As of September 30, 2017, the City recorded an operating vacancy rate of 1.0 percent after gapping for an approved complement of 50,910.6 operating positions. The year-to-date vacancy rate for capital positions was 20.6 percent for an approved complement of 3,599.5 positions.

 

Figure 4: 2017 Year-End Projected Vacancy Rate

 

Program/Agency

2017 Year-End Projection

Operating Vacancy %

Capital Vacancy %

Budgeted Gapping %

Operating* Vacancy Rate (After Gapping)

City Operations

2.7%

17.1%

2.4%

0.3%

Agencies

2.8%

7.8%

3.4%

0.0%

Corporate Accounts**

9.0%

0.0%

0.0%

9.0%

Total Levy Operations

2.8%

10.9%

2.9%

0.0%

Rate Supported Programs

7.2%

7.7%

3.0%

4.3%

Grand Total

3.1%

10.9%

2.9%

0.2%

 

*Vacancy after Gapping % is based on operating positions only.

**Corporate Accounts are largely driven by Parking Enforcement Unit vacancies.

 

The year-end operating vacancy rate after gapping is projected to be 0.2 percent for an approved complement of 50,912.6 operating positions. The forecasted vacancy rate for capital positions is projected to be 10.9 percent for an approved complement of 3,461.5 positions.

 

A detailed overview of the third quarter complement is provided in the Approved Complement Section of this report.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 20, 2017) Report and Appendices A to G from the Acting Chief Financial Officer on Operating Variance Report for the Nine Month Period Ended September 30, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109109.pdf)

Background Information (City Council)
(December 5, 2017) Supplementary report from the Interim Chief Financial Officer on Cash Advance to the Toronto Zoo (EX29.25b)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109784.pdf)


25a Operating Variance Report for the Nine Month Period Ended September 30, 2017
Origin
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide City Council with the operating variance for the nine month period ended September 30, 2017 as well as projections to year-end. This report also requests City Council's approval for amendments to the 2017 Approved Operating Budget between Programs that have no impact on the City's 2017 Approved Net Operating Budget.

 

The following table summarizes the financial position of Tax Supported Operations as of the third fiscal quarter and projection at year-end:

 

Figure 1: Tax Supported Operating Net Variance Summary ($ Millions)

Variance

September 30, 2017

Over/(Under)

Projected Y/E 2017

Over/(Under)

$

%

$

%

Gross Expenditures

(181.4)

-2.4%

(193.4)

-1.8%

Revenues

66.7

1.4%

(51.6)

-0.8%

Net Expenditures

(248.1)

-8.3%

(141.8)

-3.5%

Less: Toronto Building

(16.8)

201.3%

(12.5)

117.0%

Less: Children's Services

(8.6)

12.9

(12.0)

14.9%

Net Expenditures (Excl. Toronto Building and Children's Services)

(222.8)

-7.6%

(117.3)

-3.0%

 

In accordance with the Building Code Act, the surplus from Toronto Building must be contributed to the Building Code Act Service Improvement Reserve Fund to create and maintain systems and processes which enable service delivery timelines and reporting requirements of the Province's Bill 124, Building Code Statute Law Amendment Act, and 2002 Legislation to be met.

 

It is important to note, Children's Services year-end under-expenditure of $12.000 million net is related to Provincial / Federal growth funding to provide 825 new child care subsidies to support growth as directed by City Council on July 4, 2017 (EX26.30). A corresponding in-year adjustment is included in the Appendix F of the report for a one-time contribution to the Child Care Expansion Reserve Fund.

 

Year-to-Date Spending Results:

 

As noted in Figure 1 above, for the nine month period ended September 30, 2017, Tax Supported Operations reported a favourable net variance of $248.103 million or 8.3 percent and are projecting a year-end surplus of $141.822 million or 3.5 percent.

 

The year-to-date net under-spending was primarily driven by:

 

- Over-achieved Municipal Land Transfer Tax revenue due to higher than anticipated real estate market activity ($93.809 million net).
 

- Under-expenditure by the Toronto Transit Commission of $80.356 million net primarily as a result of lower departmental material expenditures, labour costs, and accident claims of $67.755 million net within Conventional Service, and fewer customer journeys than planned within Wheel Trans of $12.601 million net.
 

- Under-spending by Transportation Services driven by lower contract costs and decreased salt usage in the winter maintenance program ($18.103 million net).
 

- Over-achieved revenue in Toronto Building primarily due to the increasing number of building permit applications ($16.792 million net).
 

- Increased revenue from Supplementary Taxes due to a change in the historical supplementary roll delivery date compared to plan ($15.936 million net).
 

Favourable variances in other Programs and Agencies are primarily due to under-spending in salaries and benefits as a result of vacant positions. The majority of the vacant positions are expected to be filled by year-end, while other new vacant positions may occur throughout the system. More detailed explanations at the Program / Agency level can be found in the complement section of this report.

 

Year-End Spending Projections:

 

Based on this current trend, the City is projecting a net favourable year-end variance of $141.822 million or 3.5 percent. The key drivers for the expected year-end net position are largely due to the following:

 

- Higher than budgeted Municipal Land Transfer Tax revenue as a result of higher than expected sales revenue ($85.000 million net).
 

- Toronto Transit Commission - Conventional Service's under-spending of $35.076 million net is mainly related to labour expenses, employee benefits, PRESTO fees, lower diesel fuel consumption, utilities, depreciation, which are partially offset by passenger revenue increase due to the current trend of customers switching from pass-based fare media to single-ride fare media, and not requiring the budgeted reserve draw of $14.000 million. While, Wheel - Trans Service favourable variance of $14.259 million net is attributed to fewer customer journeys than budgeted. As a whole, Toronto Transit Commission is projecting a favourable year-end variance of $49.335 million net.
 

Consistent with the City's financial management practices and policies, Programs and Agencies projecting an unfavourable year-end variance are required to identify and implement mitigation strategies where possible to address any projected shortfalls.

 

It is important to note that the City's projected year-end under-spending of $141.822 million is primarily attributed to the projected higher Municipal Land Transfer Tax revenues of $85.000 million. After isolating Toronto Building projected net revenue, Municipal Land Transfer Tax over-achieved revenue accounts for 66 percent of the total City's favourable variance for year-end.

 

Rate Supported Programs:

 

As noted in Figure 2 below, for the nine month period ended September 30, 2017, Rate Supported Operations reported a favourable net variance of $14.431 million or 34.3 percent and are projecting a year-end surplus of $2.886 million.

 

Figure 2: Rate Supported Net Variance Summary ($ Millions)

Rate Supported Programs

September 30, 2017

Projected Y/E 2017

Over/(Under)

Over/(Under)

Solid Waste Management Services

2.6

(1.3)

Toronto Parking Authority

0.3

0.7

Toronto Water

(17.4)

(2.2)

Total Variance

(14.4)

(2.9)

 

The key year-to-date net under-spending in Rate Supported Program was driven by:

 

The negative variance in Solid Waste Management Services of $2.628 million net or 30.4 percent is primarily due to over-spending on contracted services, inter-divisional charges for fleet maintenance, debt service charges as well as earlier than planned reserve contributions.
 

The negative revenue in Toronto Parking Authority of $0.306 million net or 0.7 percent is primarily due to lower than planned off-street parking revenues and loss of sponsorship revenue in the Bike Share Program.

 
The positive revenue in Toronto Water of $17.365 million net is primarily due to advance postings of sale of water and industrial waste agreement revenues, as well as an overall increase in the volume demand for new sewer service connections and private water agreements.
 

Complement:

 

Figure 3: 2017 Year-To-Date Vacancy Rate

Program/Agency

2017 Year-to-Date

Operating Vacancy %

Capital Vacancy %

Budgeted Gapping %

Operating* Vacancy Rate (After Gapping)

City Operations

3.8%

23.6%

2.4%

1.3%

Agencies

3.5%

19.3%

3.4%

0.1%

Corporate Accounts**

9.0%

0.0%

0.0%

9.0%

Total Levy Operations

3.7%

20.7%

2.9%

0.8%

Rate Supported Programs

7.7%

17.7%

3.0%

4.8%

Grand Total

3.9%

20.6%

2.9%

1.0%

 

*Vacancy after Gapping % is based on operating positions only.

**Corporate Accounts are largely driven by Parking Enforcement Unit vacancies.

 

As of September 30, 2017, the City recorded an operating vacancy rate of 1.0 percent after gapping for an approved complement of 50,910.6 operating positions. The year-to-date vacancy rate for capital positions was 20.6 percent for an approved complement of 3,599.5 positions.

 

Figure 4: 2017 Year-End Projected Vacancy Rate

Program/Agency

2017 Year-End Projection

Operating Vacancy %

Capital Vacancy %

Budgeted Gapping %

Operating* Vacancy Rate (After Gapping)

City Operations

2.7%

17.1%

2.4%

0.3%

Agencies

2.8%

7.8%

3.4%

0.0%

Corporate Accounts**

9.0%

0.0%

0.0%

9.0%

Total Levy Operations

2.8%

10.9%

2.9%

0.0%

Rate Supported Programs

7.2%

7.7%

3.0%

4.3%

Grand Total

3.1%

10.9%

2.9%

0.2%

 

*Vacancy after Gapping % is based on operating positions only.

**Corporate Accounts are largely driven by Parking Enforcement Unit vacancies.

 

The year-end operating vacancy rate after gapping is projected to be 0.2 percent for an approved complement of 50,912.6 operating positions. The forecasted vacancy rate for capital positions is projected to be 10.9 percent for an approved complement of 3,461.5 positions.

 

A detailed overview of the third quarter complement is provided in the Approved Complement Section of this report.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on Operating Variance Report for the Nine Month Period Ended September 30, 2017
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109451.pdf)


EX29.27

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Budget Impacts of New Minimum Wage Policy and Other Proposed Bill 148 Changes
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council receive the report (November 17, 2017) from the City Manager and the Interim Chief Financial Officer for information.

Origin
(November 17, 2017) Report from the City Manager and the Acting Chief Financial Officer
Summary

This report provides a summary of the anticipated impacts of the legislative proposals and amendments to Ontario's Employment Standards Act, 2000 and Labour Relations Act, 1995 as currently proposed by the provincial government in the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017 (Bill 148) and the impact of these proposed changes on the City's 2018 and 2019 budget. The changes proposed to the Employment Standards Act, 2000 include a minimum wage increase from the current rate of $11.60 per hour (effective October 1, 2017) to $14.00 per hour in 2018, and $15.00 per hour in 2019.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 17, 2017) Report and Attachments 1 to 3 from the Acting Chief Financial Officer on Budget Impacts of New Minimum Wage Policy and Other Proposed Bill 148 Changes
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109091.pdf)


27a Budget Impacts of New Minimum Wage Policy and Other Proposed Bill 148 Changes
Origin
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

This report provides a summary of the anticipated impacts of the legislative proposals and amendments to Ontario's Employment Standards Act, 2000 and Labour Relations Act, 1995 as currently proposed by the provincial government in the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017 (Bill 148) and the impact of these proposed changes on the City's 2018 and 2019 budget. The changes proposed to the Employment Standards Act, 2000 include a minimum wage increase from the current rate of $11.60 per hour (effective October 1, 2017) to $14.00 per hour in 2018, and $15.00 per hour in 2019.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on Budget Impacts of New Minimum Wage Policy and Other Proposed Bill 148 Changes
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109454.pdf)


EX29.28

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Transfer of Funds from Construction Hoarding Sign Fee Reserve Fund (XR1219) and Allocation to the Toronto Arts Council for "2017 Arts in the Parks"
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:  

 

1.  City Council approve an increase to the 2017 Approved Operating Budget of the Economic Development and Culture Division in the amount of $0.200 million gross, and $0 net, fully funded by a transfer from the Construction Hoarding Sign Fee Reserve Fund (XR1219); and be allocated as follows:

 

- $0.100 million to 2017 Toronto Arts Council operating program; and

 

- $0.100 million to 2017 Toronto Arts Council grant program.

 

2.  City Council direct the General Manager of Economic Development and Culture to report back to Council in 2018 on the community impact of the Arts in the Parks program delivered by the Toronto Arts Council and its partners.

Origin
(October 25, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek City Council approval to transfer funds in the amount of $0.200 million from the Construction Hoarding Sign Fee Reserve Fund (XR1219) to the 2017 Economic Development and Culture operating budget in order to allocate it to the Toronto Arts Council (TAC).

 

The allocation of funding will be directed in the amount of $0.100 million towards the 2017 Toronto Arts Council operating program to pay for park permit fees; and $0.100 million towards the Toronto Arts Council grants program to support artists selected to perform in City of Toronto parks.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 25, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Transfer of Funds from Construction Hoarding Sign Fee Reserve Fund (XR1219) and Allocation to the Toronto Arts Council for "2017 Arts in the Parks"
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108525.pdf)


28a Transfer of Funds from Construction Hoarding Sign Fee Reserve Fund (XR1219) and Allocation to the Toronto Arts Council for "2017 Arts in the Parks"
Origin
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek City Council approval to transfer funds in the amount of $0.200 million from the Construction Hoarding Sign Fee Reserve Fund (XR1219) to the 2017 Economic Development and Culture operating budget in order to allocate it to the Toronto Arts Council (TAC).

 

The allocation of funding will be directed in the amount of $0.100 million towards the 2017 Toronto Arts Council operating program to pay for park permit fees; and $0.100 million towards the Toronto Arts Council grants program to support artists selected to perform in City of Toronto parks.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on Transfer of Funds from Construction Hoarding Sign Fee Reserve Fund (XR1219) and Allocation to the Toronto Arts Council for "2017 Arts in the Parks"
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109455.pdf)


EX29.29

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Facilities 2017 Capital Budget and 2018-2026 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations / Deferrals (November)
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the deferral and acceleration of funds in the Facilities, Real Estate, Environment and Energy (FREEE) 2017 Council Approved Capital Budget and 2018- 2026 Capital Plan in the amount of $1.735 million, as illustrated in Schedule A to the report (October 24, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, with zero gross and net debt impact.

Origin
(October 24, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services
Summary

The purpose of this report is to amend the Facilities, Real Estate, Environment and Energy (FREEE) 2017 Council Approved Capital Budget and 2018-2026 Capital Plan.  The amendments will have zero gross and net debt impact and will better align 2017 and future cash flows with Facilities, Real Estate, Environment and Energy program requirements.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 24, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services on Facilities 2017 Capital Budget and 2018-2026 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations / Deferrals (November)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108535.pdf)

Schedule "A" - 2017 Deferrals/Accelerations
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108536.pdf)


29a Facilities 2017 Capital Budget and 2018-2026 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations / Deferrals (November)
Origin
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

The purpose of this report is to amend the Facilities, Real Estate, Environment and Energy (FREEE) 2017 Council Approved Capital Budget and 2018-2026 Capital Plan.  The amendments will have zero gross and net debt impact and will better align 2017 and future cash flows with Facilities, Real Estate, Environment and Energy program requirements.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on Facilities 2017 Capital Budget and 2018-2026 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations / Deferrals (November)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109457.pdf)


EX29.30

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Fleet Services Division 2017 Capital Budget and 2018 - 2026 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations / Deferrals
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the acceleration and deferral of funds in Fleet Services Division's 2017 Council Approved Capital Budget and 2018-2026 Capital Plan in the amount of $4.150 million, as illustrated in Appendix A to the report (October 25, 2017) from the General Manager, Fleet Services Division, with zero gross and net debt impact.

 

2.  City Council request the General Manager,  Fleet Services, to report to the June 2018 Government Management Committee on opportunities to utilize commercial Car-Share company technology solutions on City owned vehicles including cars, vans, cargo vans, trucks and other assets where viable.

Origin
(October 25, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Fleet Services Division
Summary

The purpose of this report is to amend the Fleet Services Division (FSD) 2017 Council Approved Capital Budget and 2018-2027 Capital Plan. The amendments will have zero gross and net debt impact and will better align 2017 and future cash flows with Fleet Services Division program requirements.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 25, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Fleet Services Division on Fleet Services Division 2017 Capital Budget and 2018 - 2026 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations / Deferrals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108285.pdf)

Appendix A - 2017 Accelerations/Deferrals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108286.pdf)


30a Fleet Services Division 2017 Capital Budget and 2018 -2026 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations / Deferrals
Origin
(November 27, 2017) Letter from Budget Committee
Summary

 The purpose of this report is to amend the Fleet Services Division (FSD) 2017 Council Approved Capital Budget and 2018-2027 Capital Plan. The amendments will have zero gross and net debt impact and will better align 2017 and future cash flows with Fleet Services Division program requirements.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on Fleet Services Division 2017 Capital Budget and 2018 -2026 Capital Plan Adjustments and Accelerations / Deferrals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109450.pdf)


EX29.31

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Street Event User Fees for Business Improvement Areas
Bill 1445 has been submitted on this Item.
Public Notice Given
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1. City Council approve the following additional sub-category applicable to Street Event applications and permits, effective January 1, 2018 and January 1, 2019, respectively and amend City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 441, Fees and Charges, Appendix C- Schedule 2 and Chapter 743, to include any necessary descriptions:

 

BIA Signature Events with Attendance of 100,000 or Less: Business Improvement Area applicants for signature events with attendance of 100,000 or less which require full of partial road closures/occupation of Major Arterial, Minor Arterial and Collector roads for 2 or more consecutive days (four days maximum) at $200 per application per event and $313 per permit as of January 1, 2018 and $625 per permit as of January 1, 2019.

 

2.  City Council approve the following fees applicable to Street Event applications and permits, effective January 1, 2018 and January 1, 2019, respectively, and amend City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 441, Fees and Charges, Appendix C - Schedule 2 and Chapter 743, to include any necessary descriptions:

 

a.  Business Improvement Area Signature Events of Attachment 1 to the report (October 27, 2017) from the General Manager, Transportation Services, at $625 per permit as of January 1, 2018 and $1250 as of January 1, 2019;

 
b.  Business Improvement Area One Day Events of Attachment 1 to the report (October 27, 2017) from the General Manager, Transportation Services, at $100 per application per event and a permit fee of $125 as of January 1, 2018 and $250 as of January 1, 2019; and

 
c.  Business Improvement Area Sidewalk, Boulevard and/or Curb Lane of Attachment 1 to the report (October 27, 2017) from the General Manager, Transportation Services, at $25 per application per event and a permit fee of $100 per day as of January 1, 2018. 

 

3.  City Council direct the Chief Financial Officer to annually determine, in accordance with the City's User Fee Policy, the automatic annual inflationary adjustment to be applied to the street event fees and that Chapters 441 and 442 of the City of Toronto Municipal Code be amended accordingly. Inflationary increases for the fees listed in Recommendations 1, 2.a., and 2.b. to commence January 1, 2020.

Origin
(October 27, 2017) Report from General Manager, Transportation Services
Summary

City Council, at its meeting of February 15 and 16, 2017, requested the General Manager, Transportation Services to conduct further consultation with the Business Improvement Areas on the impact of the Street Event Fee increases in the 2017 Transportation Services Operating Budget.

 

As a result of the consultation, staff are recommending the new fees be implemented through a two-year phased-in approach. The new Business Improvement Area fees would see a 75 percent and 50 percent reduction applied to the approved fees, as shown in Attachment 1 of this report. The proposed 75 percent reduction would be introduced January 1, 2018 and the 50 percent reduction in January 1, 2019. This approach would allow the Business Improvement Areas to better plan for their upcoming operating budgets.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 27, 2017) Report and Attachment 1 from the General Manager, Transportation Services on Street Event User Fees for Business Improvement Areas
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109112.pdf)

(November 16, 2017) Public Notice - Street Event User Fees for Business Improvement Areas
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109213.pdf)


31a Street Event User Fees for Business Improvement Areas
Origin
(November 27, 2017) Letter from Letter from the Budget Committee on Street Event User Fees for Business Improvement Areas
Summary

City Council, at its meeting of February 15 and 16, 2017, requested the General Manager, Transportation Services to conduct further consultation with the Business Improvement Areas on the impact of the Street Event Fee increases in the 2017 Transportation Services Operating Budget.

 

As a result of the consultation, staff are recommending the new fees be implemented through a two-year phased-in approach. The new Business Improvement Area fees would see a 75 percent and 50 percent reduction applied to the approved fees, as shown in Attachment 1 of this report. The proposed 75 percent reduction would be introduced January 1, 2018 and the 50 percent reduction in January 1, 2019. This approach would allow the Business Improvement Areas to better plan for their upcoming operating budgets.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on Street Event User Fees for Business Improvement Areas
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109460.pdf)


EX29.32

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Transportation Services 2017 Capital Budget Adjustments
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the reallocation of funds within Transportation Services' Approved 2017 Capital Budget in the amount of $7.300 million, for funding of projects, as presented in Attachments 1 to the report(October 27, 2017) from the General Manager, Transportation Services, with a zero budget impact.

 

2.  City Council request the General Manager, Transportation Services, to advise the local Ward Councillors of the delays and cost overruns, and the reasons for these delays and overruns, regarding the Morningside Ave/Highland Creek, and the Prince Edward Viaduct Bridges.

 

Origin
(October 27, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Transportation Services
Summary

This report requests City Council's authority to amend Transportation Services' Approved 2017 Capital Budget by adjusting cash flows contained within the 2017 Budget to align with project delivery schedule and program requirements. These reallocations will allow Transportation Services to continue to deliver projects within its Capital Plan. The adjustments will have a zero dollar impact on the 2017 Transportation Services' Approved Capital Budget and result in improved spending rates.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 27, 2017) Report and Attachment 1 from the General Manager, Transportation Services on Transportation Services 2017 Capital Budget Adjustments
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109155.pdf)


32b Transportation Services 2017 Capital Budget Adjustments
Origin
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

This report requests City Council's authority to amend Transportation Services' Approved 2017 Capital Budget by adjusting cash flows contained within the 2017 Budget to align with project delivery schedule and program requirements. These reallocations will allow Transportation Services to continue to deliver projects within its Capital Plan. The adjustments will have a zero dollar impact on the 2017 Transportation Services' Approved Capital Budget and result in improved spending rates.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on Transportation Services 2017 Capital Budget Adjustments
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109462.pdf)


EX29.33

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:11, 16, 18, 20, 26, 27, 32 

Arena Boards of Management 2016 Operating Surpluses/Deficits Settlement
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct that the 2016 Operating Budget surpluses totalling $43,265 from three Arenas (William H. Bolton, North Toronto Memorial and Red Reeve) be paid to the City of Toronto and be used, in part, to fund the 2016 Operating Budget deficits of $199,490 for four Arenas (George Bell, Forest Hill Memorial, McCormick, and Moss Park), resulting in an operating net deficit balance of $156,225 to be funded by the City, as illustrated in Appendix A, column (g), to the report (November 13, 2017) from the Interim Chief Financial Officer.

 

2.  City Council direct that the funding provision for the 2016 Arena Boards Operating Budget net deficit of $26,325 be made through the 2017 Final Year-End Operating Variance Report, as calculated in the attached Appendix A - 2016 Program Summary, to the report (November 13, 2017) from the Interim Chief Financial Officer.

Origin
(November 13, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer
Summary

This report recommends settlements with the eight Arena Boards of Management (Arenas) of their 2016 operating surpluses and deficits based on the audited financial statements for the year-ended December 31, 2016, with operating surpluses payable to the City and operating deficits funded by the City upon Council's approval.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 13, 2017) Report and Appendix A from the Acting Chief Financial Officer on Arena Boards of Management 2016 Operating Surpluses/Deficits Settlement
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109113.pdf)


33a Arena Boards of Management 2016 Operating Surpluses/Deficits Settlement
Origin
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

This report recommends settlements with the eight Arena Boards of Management (Arenas) of their 2016 operating surpluses and deficits based on the audited financial statements for the year-ended December 31, 2016, with operating surpluses payable to the City and operating deficits funded by the City upon Council's approval.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on Arena Boards of Management 2016 Operating Surpluses/Deficits Settlement
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109459.pdf)


EX29.34

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Sony Centre for the Performing Arts - Reallocation of 2017 State of Good Repair Capital Funds
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve reductions to the following underspent debt funded capital projects in the 2017 Capital Budget for the Sony Centre totalling $0.799 million:

 
a.  East Side Restoration project (CHU009-01; $0.076 million)
b.  Exterior Wall project (CHU008-01; $0.648 million)
c.  Stage Floor Replacement project (CHU010-06; $0.075 million)
 

2.  City Council approve an increase to the capital budget for the Fire Curtain Replacement project (CHU010-05) by $0.075 million from $0.261 million to $0.336 million, and the addition of three new capital projects as follows, fully funded by debt reallocated in recommendation 1:

 
a.  LED Auditorium Lighting for $0.245 million;
b.  Concession Stands for $0.240 million; and
c.  Automated Rigging Hoists for $0.239 million.

Origin
(November 10, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer
Summary

The purpose of this report is to transmit to City Council the request from the Board of Directors of The Hummingbird (Sony) Centre for the Performing Arts to apply permanent underspending from three projects in their 2017 Capital Budget to three new projects and one overspent project. These changes will deliver an energy cost savings initiative, AODA compliance for the theatre's concession stands, a fire curtain replacement, and rigging hoist automation projects.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 10, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer on Sony Centre for the Performing Arts - Reallocation of 2017 State of Good Repair Capital Funds
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108947.pdf)


34a Sony Centre for the Performing Arts - Reallocation of 2017 State of Good Repair Capital Funds
Origin
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

The purpose of this report is to transmit to City Council the request from the Board of Directors of The Hummingbird (Sony) Centre for the Performing Arts to apply permanent underspending from three projects in their 2017 Capital Budget to three new projects and one overspent project. These changes will deliver an energy cost savings initiative, AODA compliance for the theatre's concession stands, a fire curtain replacement, and rigging hoist automation projects.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on Sony Centre for the Performing Arts - Reallocation of 2017 State of Good Repair Capital Funds
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109461.pdf)


EX29.35

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Toronto Transit Commission 2017 Operating Budget Adjustment
Communication EX29.35.1 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve a total Toronto Transit Commission complement of 14,995 positions reflecting an increase of 26 positions from the Board approved Budget; and 414 positions from the Council approved 2017 Operating Budget, fully funded from existing salary and benefit expenditures included in the approved budget for these positions.

Origin
(November 14, 2017) Letter from the Head of Commission Services, Toronto Transit Commission
Summary

At its meeting on Monday, November 13, 2017 the Toronto Transit Commission Board considered the attached report entitled, "Toronto Transit Commission 2017 Operating Budget Adjustment".

 

The Toronto Transit Commission Board adopted the recommendations in the staff report, as follows:

 

It is recommended that the Board:

 

1.  Approve a total Toronto Transit Commission complement of 14,995 positions reflecting an increase of 26 positions from the Board approved Budget; and 414 positions from the Council approved 2017 Operating Budget, fully funded from existing salary and benefit expenditures included in the approved budget for these positions; and

 

2.  Forward this report to the City's Budget Committee for approval.

 

The foregoing is submitted to the City of Toronto Budget Committee and the City of Toronto Executive Committee, for approval.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 14, 2017) Letter from the Head of Commission Services, Toronto Transit Commission on Toronto Transit Commission 2017 Operating Budget Adjustment
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109114.pdf)

(November 13, 2017) Report from the Chief Executive Officer, Toronto Transit Commission on Toronto Transit Commission 2017 Operating Budget Adjustment
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109115.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(December 4, 2017) E-mail from Sharon Yetman (CC.New.EX29.35.1)

35a Toronto Transit Commission 2017 Operating Budget Adjustment
Origin
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee
Summary

At its meeting on Monday, November 13, 2017 the Toronto Transit Commission Board considered the attached report entitled, "Toronto Transit Commission 2017 Operating Budget Adjustment".

 

The Toronto Transit Commission Board adopted the recommendations in the staff report, as follows:

 

It is recommended that the Board:

 

1.  Approve a total Toronto Transit Commission complement of 14,995 positions reflecting an increase of 26 positions from the Board approved Budget; and 414 positions from the Council approved 2017 Operating Budget, fully funded from existing salary and benefit expenditures included in the approved budget for these positions; and

 

2.  Forward this report to the City's Budget Committee for approval.

 

The foregoing is submitted to the City of Toronto Budget Committee and the City of Toronto Executive Committee, for approval.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 27, 2017) Letter from the Budget Committee on Toronto Transit Commission 2017 Operating Budget Adjustment
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109463.pdf)


EX29.36

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Establishment of an Indigenous Affairs Office at the City of Toronto
First Item after lunch recess on Wednesday, December 6th
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council express its support for establishing an Indigenous Affairs Office within the City Manager's Office at the City of Toronto.

 

2.  City Council refer the new and enhanced request of $0.480 million gross and net for the addition of 4.0 positions to staff the Indigenous Affairs Office and $0.040 million gross and net to retain an external consultant, for a total of $0.520 million gross and net, included in the City Manager's Office 2018 Operating Budget Submission for consideration as part of the 2018 budget process.

 

3.  City Council request the City Manager to submit funding applications, as appropriate, to federal and provincial governments, to non-profit organizations and to private sector organizations to support the establishment and work of the Indigenous Affairs Office, and authorize the City Manager to enter into such agreements in a form satisfactory to the City Manager and City Solicitor.

 

4.  City Council, as affirmed by the City's commitment to Aboriginal people to self-determination, direct the City Manager to engage the Aboriginal community on the establishment of an Indigenous Affairs Office at the City of Toronto to ensure that it is designed, developed, and reflective of the Aboriginal community's vision.

Origin
(November 3, 2017) Letter from the Aboriginal Affairs Committee
Summary

The City of Toronto will establish an Indigenous Affairs Office within the City Manager's Office. The Indigenous Affairs Office will report directly to the City Manager, with an administrative reporting relationship to the Director, Equity, Diversity and Human Rights for the purposes of budget, timekeeping and administrative support. In this report, the term 'Indigenous' is used to refer to the First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities.

 

A survey of City divisions indicates several are engaged in initiatives related to Indigenous affairs and a number have staff positions that are assigned to related portfolios. While the City remains committed to embedding responsibility for Indigenous priorities within divisions, the City recognizes the need for a centralized Indigenous Affairs Office in the City Manager's Office to, among other things:

 

- strengthen the City's relationship with Indigenous communities;


- develop and implement a reconciliation framework/strategy for the City;


 - support City divisions in the development and implementation of reconciliation initiatives and provision of subject matter expertise, including to support conversations with other orders of government;


- assist in the development of Indigenous cultural competency training and related education for the Toronto Public Service;


- support the Aboriginal Affairs Committee;


- track and report on the City's progress in responding to the eight Truth and Reconciliation Priority Calls to Action adopted by the City;


- ensure that the City's work with Indigenous communities is in accordance with the City's Statement of Commitment to the Aboriginal Communities of Toronto;


- promote Indigenous civic participation and inclusion in the City's decision making processes;


- support Indigenous cultural events at the City; and


- secure funding for Indigenous related initiatives.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 3, 2017) Letter from the Aboriginal Affairs Committee on Establishment of an Indigenous Affairs Office at the City of Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108902.pdf)

(October 27, 2017) Report from the City Manager on the Establishment of an Indigenous Affairs Office at the City of Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108901.pdf)

(November 9, 2017) Appendix A - Report from Toronto Aboriginal Support Services Council (TASSC)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108879.pdf)

Appendix B - City of Toronto Resources Directed to Indigenous Programs or Services
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108900.pdf)

Speakers

Miguel Avila-Velarde
Frances Sanderson, Nishnawbe Homes Inc.
Councillor Mike Layton
Councillor Joe Cressy


EX29.37

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Executive Management Indigenous Cultural Competency Training
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council request the Acting Director, Equity, Diversity and Human Rights, in consultation with the City Clerk, to organize Indigenous cultural competency training for Members of Council and their staff.

 

2.  City Council request the City Manager and the Interim Chief Financial Officer to include this initiative in the City Manager's Office 2018 operating budget, for consideration in the 2018 budget process with other City priorities.

Origin
(November 3, 2017) Letter from the Aboriginal Affairs Committee
Summary

Omo Akintan, Acting Director, Equity, Diversity and Human Rights, provided an update to the Committee on Executive Management Indigenous Cultural Competency Training by the Ontario Federation of Indigenous Friendship Centres. This training to the City of Toronto's senior management team aims to increase understanding of the unique needs of Indigenous communities and on how to enhance relationships with the communities they serve.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 3, 2017) Letter from the Aboriginal Affairs Committee on Executive Management Indigenous Cultural Competency Training
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-109007.pdf)


EX29.38

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Festivals and Events Funding Program Criteria to Incorporate Accessibility Requirements
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct that:

 

a.  All festival and events funding programs require any external organizations seeking funding from the City of Toronto to hold a festival or event be required, as part of the eligibility criteria, to submit a detailed plan outlining the specific accessibility services that will be offered during their festival or event; and

 

b. The accessibility plan requested in Recommendation 1a. include information on projects and/or initiatives to ensure that any and all communication platforms and marketing material are developed and offered with a focus on accessibility.

Origin
(October 25, 2017) Letter from the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee
Summary

At its meeting of October 25, 2017, the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee considered a report from Darren Cooper, on behalf of the Information and Communications Working Group, Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 25, 2017) Letter from the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee on Festival and Events Funding Program Criteria - to Incorporate Accessibility Requirements
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108325.pdf)

(October 10, 2017) Report from Darren Cooper, on behalf of the Information and Communications Working Group, Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee on Festivals and Events Funding Program Criteria - to Incorporate Accessibility Requirements
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108326.pdf)


EX29.41

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Status of Suite Metering in Rental Buildings in Toronto
The General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration has submitted a supplementary report on this Item (EX29.41a for information)
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council request the Province of Ontario to extend the Ontario Electricity Support Program to low-income households who are tenants in buildings without sub-meters.

 

2.  City Council forward the report (September 27, 2017) from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration to the Chief Executive Officer, Toronto Atmospheric Fund for consideration.

 

3.  City Council request the General Manager of Shelter Support and Housing Administration, in consultation with community-based legal clinics and tenant advocacy groups, to undertake further review and develop recommendations for changes to provincial legislation and guidelines related to electricity suite metering to provide greater protection to tenants and ensure stronger oversight and accountability of suite metering companies, and report to a  future meeting of the Tenant Issues Committee with a position to forward to the provincial government on this matter. 

 

4.  City Council request the Executive Director of Municipal Licensing and Standards to consider including additional information related to suite metering in the Apartment Building By-law registration requirements to better understand the extent of sub-metering in Toronto’s rental housing stock, and to include any recommendations for changes in the update report of the Apartment Building Bylaw that will be provided to the Licensing and Standards Committee in 2018.

 

5.  City Council request the Director, Environment and Energy Office to report to the Parks and Environment Committee, in the second quarter of 2018, on energy efficiency proposals for multi-unit residential buildings for condominiums, landlords and tenants.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Executive Committee:

 

1.  Requested the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Administration to report directly to City Council on the supports offered to low income residents by the Ontario Electricity Support Program (OESP).

 

2.  Requested the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration to obtain information offered by the Sub-Metering Council of Ontario for consideration in connection to this matter.

Origin
(October 13, 2017) Letter from the Tenant Issues Committee
Summary

At its meeting of October 13, 2017, the Tenant Issues Committee considered a report (September 27, 2017) from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration on Status of Suite Metering in Rental Buildings in Toronto.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 13, 2017) Letter from the Tenant Issues Committee on Status of Suite Metering in Rental Buildings in Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108029.pdf)

(September 27, 2017) Report and Attachment 1 from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration on Status of Suite Metering in Rental Buildings in Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108030.pdf)

Background Information (City Council)
(December 4, 2017) Supplementary report from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration on Overview of the Ontario Electricity Support Program (OESP) (EX29.41a)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109737.pdf)

Speakers

Chelsea Provencher, Sub-Metering Council of Ontario
Councillor Janet Davis

Communications (Committee)
(November 23, 2017) Letter from Chelsea Provencher, on behalf of the Sub-metering Council of Ontario (EX.Supp.EX29.41.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/comm/communicationfile-74013.pdf)


EX29.43

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Municipal Property Taxation for Railway Rights-Of-Way
Committee Recommendations

The Executive Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council request the Provincial Government to amend Regulation 387/98 Tax Matters - Taxation of Certain Railway, Power Utility Lands, such that a new system of municipal property taxation for railway right-of-ways is based on an assessed value, which is to include tonnage.  

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Executive Committee requested the City Treasurer to report to the Executive Committee on January 24, 2018 on the potential revenue the City could raise if the Province were to implement a modified taxation system based on tonnage, along with comparison data from other municipalities in Provinces where this taxation policy is already in place.

Origin
(November 6, 2017) Letter from Councillor Paul Ainslie
Summary

Prior to 1998, in Ontario, railway right-of-ways were assessed based on the market value of abutting lands, and they were taxed at local mill rates. In 1998, a new fixed rate tax system was introduced. The result was a change in the assessment procedures for railway right-of-ways. They were taxed at a fixed rate per acre, based on prescribed municipal and education tax rates.

 

For the new system, the province was divided into nine regions and different tax rates have been prescribed for each region based on the average tax levels which existed on rail corridor properties prior to 1998. The Provincial government since then, has proposed various options to update the railway right-of-way property tax system, but nothing has ever been done.

 

One option was to implement an indexed rate, which would maintain a rate per acre property tax, and be updated regularly. Another proposed option, was to implement a minimum rate per acre to address the lower rates and variances between regions. The Province also proposed an approach that is based on assessed value of each ton of cargo over each kilometre of railroad track a train travels.

 

The City of Toronto has an opportunity to support municipalities in northern Ontario in their desire to increase their financial viability with introduction of an assessed value system based on tonnage which is their preferred option.  It would benefit all municipalities including the City of Toronto as we search for additional funding to maintain our financial stability as well.

 

For many years provinces such as Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta have levied a tax on railroad companies per ton, per mile, travelled through municipalities. It would be prudent for the City of Toronto and the Province of Ontario to review the revenue opportunities available, and implement a revised system. 

 

I look forward to your support on this important matter.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 6, 2017) Letter from Councillor Paul Ainslie on Municipal Property Taxation for Railway Rights-Of-Way
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ex/bgrd/backgroundfile-108777.pdf)


Board of Health - Meeting 22
HL22.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Reducing Health Risks from Traffic-Related Air Pollution (TRAP) in Toronto
To be considered with Item PE23.7

Communications HL22.3.5 and HL22.3.6 have been submitted on this Item.
Board Recommendations

The Board of Health recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct the Director, Environment and Energy Division, in collaboration with the Medical Officer of Health, to:

 

a.  Work with staff from City Planning; Toronto Building; Children's Services; Long-Term Care Homes and Services; Facilities Management; Transportation Services; Engineering and Construction Services; Parks, Forestry and Recreation; the Toronto Public Library; and other appropriate City divisions and agencies, to develop feasible best practices on how to reduce exposure to traffic-related air pollution, and facilitate their implementation at City facilities;

 

b.  Develop guidance to assist appropriate City agencies, corporations, and divisions in establishing traffic-related air pollution mitigation measures at City-owned sites located within 500 metres of roads with annual average traffic volumes of 100,000 vehicles or more per day, and within 100 metres of roads with annual average traffic volumes of 15,000 vehicles or more per day; and

 

c.  Develop best practices guidelines for new and existing buildings, in consultation with industry professionals, and raise awareness of these practices among school board staff, child care centre operators, long-term care facility operators, and residents, as well as builders, developers, designers, architects, engineers and other professionals.

 

2.  City Council direct the General Manager, Transportation Services, in collaboration with the Director, Environment and Energy Division, to:

 

a.  Pursue, through the Toronto Congestion Management Plan (2016-2020), opportunities to reduce traffic-related air pollution;

 

b.  Undertake an evaluation of the City's street sweeping service levels to identify any possible enhancements that could improve air quality along Toronto's roadways by:

 

1.  Adopting Ontario's interim 24-hour Ambient Air Quality Criterion (AAQC) for coarse particulate matter (PM10) of 50 micrograms per cubic metre of air (50 µg/m3) and the 24-hour Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard (CAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) of 28 micrograms per cubic metre of air (28 µg/m3) as air quality benchmarks for the maximum desirable concentration of particulate matter in air along Toronto streets;

 

2.  Conducting an air quality monitoring study of ambient PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations along City streets to assess the impact of current street sweeping practices, and using the findings to inform street sweeping service levels;

 

3.  Developing an air quality monitoring program for ambient PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations to assess whether the interim 24-hour Ambient Air Quality Criterion for PM10 and the 24-hour Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM2.5 are met near roadways; and

 

4.  Giving first priority to meeting the air quality benchmarks at sensitive use properties, including child care centres, schools, and long-term care homes, within 500 metres of roads with annual average traffic volumes of 100,000 vehicles or more per day, and giving second priority to sensitive uses within 100 metres of roads with annual average traffic volumes of 15,000 vehicles or more per day, and identify a strategy for meeting the air quality benchmarks more broadly across the City giving priority to areas with elevated particulate matter concentrations and residential areas.

 

3.  City Council request the Ontario Minister of Environment and Climate Change to:

 

a.  Undertake mobile air quality monitoring and air modelling along provincial highways including those located in Toronto to assess the relationship between traffic counts and air quality in areas adjacent to these highways, to estimate health risks, and provide trends over time;

 

b.  Estimate the cost of social, environmental, and health impacts associated with TRAP, including health-care costs and years of life lost, and compare these with the costs of preventing emissions of, and exposure to, TRAP; and

 

c.  Establish a special air management area focussed on land adjacent to Provincial highways in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area to facilitate development and implementation of provincial and municipal measures to reduce releases of, and exposure to, traffic-related air pollution along these highways.

 

4.  City Council request the Ontario Minister of Finance to implement financing and funding mechanisms for building retrofits needed to reduce exposure to traffic-related air pollution, with a priority placed on supporting retrofits of buildings with sensitive uses (such as schools, child care centres and long-term care facilities) located near highways and roads with average daily traffic volumes of 100,000 vehicles or more.

 

5.  City Council request the Ontario Minister of Transportation to review the feasibility of modifying street sweeping standards and practices on Provincial Highways to reduce levels of PM10 (particulate matter with an average diameter of 10 micrometres of less) in air along such highways.

 

6.  City Council request the Federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change to:

 

a.  Harmonize Canadian environmental emissions standards for fuels, vehicles and engines with those applicable in the State of California;

 

b.  Identify a strategy to reduce emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases from older model heavy-duty diesel trucks; and

 

c.  Include in Canada's Clean Fuel Standard, limits to emissions of air pollutants, in addition to the proposed limits on greenhouse gases.

 

7.  City Council forward the report (October 16, 2017) from the Medical Officer of Health and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Public Health Ontario (PHO), Central Local Health Integration Network (LHIN), Central East LHIN, Central West LHIN, Mississauga Halton LHIN, Toronto Central LHIN, the Toronto District School Board (TDSB), the Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB), le Conseil Scolaire Viamonde, le Conseil Scolaire Catholique MonAvenir, the Ontario Long Term Care Association (OLTCA), AdvantAge Ontario, the Home Child Care Association of Ontario, the Association of Day Care Operators of Ontario (ADCO), the Ontario Landlords Association, Toronto Landlords, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the Ontario Association of Architects (OAA), the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD), the Ontario Home Builders’ Association, the Greater Toronto Area Clean Air Council (GTA-CAC), and the Pembina Institute.

Board Decision Advice and Other Information

The Board of Health also:

 

1.  Requested Public Health Ontario to conduct air quality monitoring near buildings occupied by vulnerable populations, such as schools, child care centres and long-term care facilities in Toronto, to gather information about exposures to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) in these settings, with a view to supporting building operators in understanding and mitigating exposure to TRAP.

 

2.  Requested the Medical Officer of Health to undertake an assessment of traffic-related air pollution using Toronto Public Health's Child-Friendly Policy Assessment Tool, to identify any additional measures that could be implemented to reduce negative impacts on children's health.

 

3.  Directed that its recommendations on this item be submitted to City Council at the same time as the recommendations from the Parks and Environment Committee.

 

The Director, Healthy Public Policy, Toronto Public Health, and Associate Director, Healthy Public Policy, Toronto Public Health, gave a presentation on Reducing Health Risks from Traffic Related Air Pollution (TRAP).

Origin
(October 16, 2017) Report from the Medical Officer of Health and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services
Summary

Toronto's air quality is improving. Policies and programs implemented by federal, provincial and municipal governments have led to decreases in pollutant emissions, ambient air pollution levels, and related health impacts. However, Toronto Public Health estimates that air pollution still contributes to 1,300 premature deaths and 3,550 hospitalizations in Toronto each year.

 

Motor vehicle traffic is the largest source of air pollution emitted in Toronto. Exposures to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) are highest near highways and busy roads. The health literature indicates that health risk from TRAP is higher within 500 metres of highways with an average daily traffic volume of 100,000 vehicles or more, and within 100 metres of arterial roads with an average daily traffic volume of 15,000 vehicles or more. Studies show that people living close to roads are more likely to experience adverse health outcomes including breathing problems, heart disease, cancer, and premature death. People who are more vulnerable to these impacts include children, the elderly, and people with certain pre-existing medical conditions.

 

Emissions of TRAP in Toronto can be reduced with sustained focus on initiatives that promote active transportation and transit, reduce congestion, and encourage use of electric vehicles. Recent updates to the Official Plan, the Walking Strategy, the Toronto Complete Streets Guidelines, the 10-year Cycling Network Plan, and TransformTO, Toronto's renewed climate action plan, are among the City initiatives that will reduce exposure to TRAP.

 

There are additional opportunities to reduce health risks from TRAP. Operational changes in buildings and a combination of strategies including site planning, building design, and physical barriers can be used during construction or when retrofitting older buildings. Bringing these best practices to the attention of those who design and manage buildings, particularly buildings occupied by vulnerable populations such as schools, child care centres and long-term care facilities, can encourage their adoption. Funding and other financing mechanisms can encourage building retrofits to mitigate exposure to TRAP, especially for vulnerable populations.

 

A special provincial air quality management approach for large urban areas can help provide a framework for focused interventions. Regular air quality monitoring along busy highways, and an assessment of the costs associated with TRAP, can help better define the challenge and assess the effectiveness of interventions. Strengthening partnerships with organizations around the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area and across Canada who are addressing TRAP will help identify and implement best practices and contribute to reducing exposure to TRAP in Toronto.

Background Information (Board)
(October 16, 2017) Revised Report from the Medical Officer of Health and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, on Reducing Health Risks from Traffic-Related Air Pollution (TRAP) in Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/hl/bgrd/backgroundfile-108179.pdf)

(October 16, 2017) Report from the Medical Officer of Health and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, on Reducing Health Risks from Traffic-Related Air Pollution (TRAP) in Toronto
Attachment 1 - Map of Expected Zones of TRAP Exposure in the City of Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/hl/bgrd/backgroundfile-108079.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Avoiding the TRAP: Traffic-Related Air Pollution in Toronto and Options for Reducing Exposure
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/hl/bgrd/backgroundfile-108070.pdf)

(October 30, 2017) Presentation from the Director, Healthy Public Policy, Toronto Public Health, and Associate Director, Healthy Public Policy, Toronto Public Health, on Reducing Health Risks from Traffic Related Air Pollution (TRAP)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/hl/bgrd/backgroundfile-108479.pdf)

Speakers

Gil (Guillermo) Penalosa, Founder and Chair, 8 80 Cities
Van MacDonald, High Park Tenants' Association
Angie Knowles, High Park Tenants' Association

Communications (Board)
(October 30, 2017) E-mail from Sarah Buchanan, Clean Economy Program Manager, Environmental Defence (HL.New.HL22.3.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/hl/comm/communicationfile-73261.pdf)

(October 30, 2017) E-mail from Gideon Forman, Climate Change and Transportation Policy Analyst, David Suzuki Foundation (HL.New.HL22.3.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/hl/comm/communicationfile-73262.pdf)

(October 30, 2017) E-mail from Lindsay Wiginton, Analyst, Transportation and Urban Solutions, Pembina Institute (HL.New.HL22.3.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/hl/comm/communicationfile-73263.pdf)

(October 30, 2017) Submission from Van MacDonald, High Park Tenants' Association, and Angie Knowles, High Park Tenants Association (HL.New.HL22.3.4)
Communications (City Council)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Jeannie MacLean (CC.Supp.HL22.3.5)
(November 30, 2017) Letter from Linda McCarthy, Secretary, Pulmonary Rehabilitation Clinic, Toronto Western Hospital (CC.Supp.HL22.3.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74302.pdf)


Community Development and Recreation Committee - Meeting 24
CD24.1

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Repeal of Municipal Code Chapter 387 in Response to Amendments to the Ontario Fire Code
Committee Recommendations

The Community Development and Recreation Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council repeal City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 387, Carbon Monoxide Detectors.

Origin
(October 25, 2017) Report from the Fire Chief and General Manager, Toronto Fire Services
Summary

The 2013 and 2014 amendments to the Ontario Fire Code (OFC) and the Fire Protection and Prevention Act, 1997 (FPPA) introduced regulations concerning the installation, maintenance, testing and replacement of Carbon Monoxide (CO) detectors in existing residential occupancies.  These amendments rendered Chapter 387, Carbon Monoxide Detectors of the City of Toronto Municipal Code (Carbon Monoxide Detector By-Law) redundant and superseded by the applicable OFC regulations, as a result Chapter 387 should be repealed.  TFS will continue to enforce the OFC, under its legislated authority, and is committed to ensuring that appropriate measures are taken by property owners to achieve fire and life safety through compliance with the OFC and the FPPA.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 25, 2017) Report from the Fire Chief and General Manager, Toronto Fire Services on Repeal of Municipal Code Chapter 387 in Response to Amendments to the Ontario Fire Code
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-108443.pdf)


CD24.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Community Recreation 2018-2020 Growth Plan and Waitlist Management
Committee Recommendations

The Community Development and Recreation Committee recommends that:

 

1. City Council approve the Community Recreation 2018-2020 Growth Plan as outlined in Appendix 1 to the report (November 6, 2017) from the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, that will add 60,000 program spaces at existing community centres where demand and projected future demand exist, over three Phases as follows, subject to annual budget approval:

 

Phase

Year

Number of New Spaces

Cumulative Total of

New Spaces

1

2018

10,000

10,000

2

2019

25,000

35,000

3

2020

25,000

60,000

 

2.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to continue monitoring and reporting overall waitlist size annually as part of performance indicators for the Community Recreation 2018-2020 Growth Plan.

 

3.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, to report to the Budget Committee, as part of the 2018 Operating Budget process, on the maximum number of program spaces that can be created in existing facilities in 2018 and the associated cost, with a regional breakdown of the number of new spaces and types of programs that would be expanded.

 

4.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to report to the Budget Committee, as part of the 2018 Operating Budget process, on the cost to increase the number of new recreation spaces in 2018 to a goal of 20,000 spaces and to report to the Community Development and Recreation Committee by the second quarter of 2019 on next steps to increase targets of service growth in community recreation.

 

5.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation report to the February 28, 2018 Community Development and Recreation Committee meeting on:

 

a.  opportunities and costs to provide and expand low barrier, accessible recreation programming in partnership with universities, colleges, Toronto District School Board Toronto Catholic District School Board lands and facilities to supplement existing programming to meet current demand by reducing the waitlist; and
 

b.  opportunities and costs of partnering with community organizations such as OpenStreetTO, Earth Day Canada and other community organizations to leverage their existing programs to expand low barrier, accessible recreation programming to meet current demand by reducing the waitlist.

 

6.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, to fully implement the Recreation Service Plan goal of delivering the Swim to Survive program to all grade four students by 2021 and include the operating costs required for the phase 3 implementation in the 2018 Operating Budget for Council consideration.

 

7.  City Council direct the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation to report back on measures taken to ensure that the Community Recreation 2018-2020 Growth Plan does not result in the reduction of locally customized programming or programs serving equity-seeking communities and vulnerable populations.

Origin
(November 6, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation
Summary

This report responds to the Community Development and Recreation Committee's (CDR) request for Parks, Forestry and Recreation (PFR) to report on a strategy to reduce waitlists and grow recreation services.

  

Implementation of the Council-approved Recreation Service Plan (RSP) is nearing completion and has achieved its main objectives of increasing overall participation in recreation, decreasing financial barriers, and improving local and geographic access.

 

Community Recreation offers affordable, quality recreation programs. Due to high demand for these programs, Community Recreation continues to experience waitlists for registered/instructional programs.

 

To address demand and ensure the best response, Community Recreation analyzes local programming. Service planning in recreation, including programming changes and additions, is informed by a variety of inputs including local demographics, trends, changes in registration patterns, and customer feedback. A program mix is created that optimizes the space available in facilities, and programs are expected to meet divisional service standards to ensure consistency in how they are delivered.

 

A key part of Community Recreation's efforts to address demand and alleviate waitlists is through the implementation of the Growth and Waitlist Management Plan (the Growth Plan).

 

The Growth Plan, if approved, will be phased in over three years (2018-2020) subject to annual budget approval, and is projected to add 60,000 program spaces to address demand. Additionally, with the scheduled opening of new and expanded community centres over the next three years an estimated 11,000 net new program spaces will also be added.

 

Implementation of the Growth Plan, if approved, requires funding which has been requested through a New and Enhanced business case in the 2018 PFR Operating Budget to be provided over three years including $0.482 million gross and $0.386 million net and 11.13 FTEs in the 2018 budget.

 

Following is an overview of the strategies and measures PFR is undertaking to respond to demand, reduce waitlists and maximize participation in its programs.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 6, 2017) Report and Appendix 1 from the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation on Community Recreation 2018-2020 Growth Plan and Waitlist Management
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-108888.pdf)

Speakers

Asasha McCreath
Tim Maguire, President, Canadian Union of Public Employees CUPE Local 79

Communications (Committee)
(November 17, 2017) Submission from Katrina Miller, Strategic Communications and Campaigns, Canadian Union of Public Employees CUPE Local 79 (CD.New.CD24.3.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/comm/communicationfile-73958.pdf)


CD24.4

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

For Public Benefit: Whole-of-Government Framework to Guide City of Toronto Relationships with the Community-Based Not-for-Profit Sector
Committee Recommendations

The Community Development and Recreation Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council adopt the vision, objectives, principles, and commitments set out in Appendix 1 to the report (November 7, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A.

 

2.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A to implement the proposed actions set out in Appendix 2 to the report (November 7, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A, with the exception of Actions No. 7 and No. 8.

 

3.  City Council direct the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management and the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration to consider the following Actions No. 7 and No. 8, as set out in Appendix 2 to the report (November 7, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A, for potential inclusion in future operating budgets:

 

 7.  Establish a Not-for-Profit Sector Specialization within Economic Development and Culture Division, focused on optimizing the economic impact of not-for-profits and strengthening the sector's role in inclusive economic development.

 

8.  Work with City Divisions, Agencies and Corporations to educate them on potential advantages from including qualified Not-for-Profit Sector organizations into a competitive procurement and work with them to develop potential guidelines on how to structure a competitive procurement that makes it fair for not-for-profit sector organizations and for-profit sector organizations to compete.

 

4.  City Council direct the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration to coordinate and monitor the implementation of the recommendations in the report (November 7, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A, and to provide a progress report to the Community Development and Recreation Committee every other year, starting in 2019.

 

5.  City Council forward the report (November 7, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A to the Premier of Ontario, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration and the Federal Minister of Employment and Social Development.

Origin
(November 7, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A
Summary

Governments across Canada and internationally are moving to recognize and optimize their relationships with the not-for-profit sector, in light of the unique role that not-for-profit organizations play in advancing social, cultural, and economic vitality in their jurisdictions . This report responds to Council direction to design a "whole-of-government" policy framework to guide the City of Toronto's interactions with the community-based not-for-profit sector ("the Sector"). 

 

The vision guiding this policy framework is vibrant, inclusive, engaged and equitably resourced communities that benefit all Torontonians. The framework is intended to enable the City to optimize its relationship with the Sector and respond to the Sector's contributions to the public good more strategically and consistently, while at the same time not hindering the flexibility that both parties continue to need to execute their work.

 

The framework is also intended to help to educate Torontonians about the public benefits generated by the Sector and to acknowledge formally the City's reliance on an interdependent relationship with the Sector to achieve many city-building goals.

 

It is not widely recognized that the community-based not-for-profit sector is a significant economic actor in Toronto and employer in Toronto, generating at least $14 Billion in revenues and over 200,000 jobs (full time and part-time). Moreover, the Sector often represents the first access point for vulnerable individuals entering the workforce and therefore serves as an important conduit for residents' economic inclusion. However, the City does not currently have a strategy for relating with the Sector from an economic development standpoint in the same way that we cooperate with many industries in Toronto. The policy framework and actions proposed here will position the City to provide greater encouragement and monitoring of the Sector's economic impact and workforce development.

 

The not-for-profit sector is integral to the work of the City of Toronto. In particular, the City relies on the Sector as the delivery arm for hundreds of community services that are provided to residents, including but not limited to social housing, child care, employment and social services, shelter services and cultural programming.  The City's investments in the Sector are estimated at $900 Million. However the City does not currently bring a whole-of-government lens to document and optimize financial transactions with the Sector. The proposed policy framework and actions would prepare the City and the Sector to take these steps.

 

The City also lacks a consistent framework or set of guiding principles for relating with the Sector in terms of shared city-building goals in the areas of service delivery, community engagement and policy development. The City can frame its relationship with the same not-for-profit organization in several different and potentially contradictory ways, depending on the type of interaction.  While this flexibility ensures Divisions and not-for-profit organizations can achieve their mandates, lacking an overarching framework limits capacity to create and achieve strategic objectives.  The policy framework and actions proposed here will establish the groundwork for stronger and more strategic cooperation between the City and the Sector.

 

The expression, "Not-for-Profit," distinguishes the Sector from the business world but does little to convey the Sector's role or contributions. The proposed policy framework is entitled "For Public Benefit" to introduce new language that names the role and contributions of the Sector meaningfully and positively, in terms of what the Sector is "for"; rather than what it is not "for".

 

The proposed framework was co-designed with a Community Advisory Table and is informed by stakeholder consultations and an extensive literature review conducted by Social Planning Toronto. It contains a vision statement, objectives, a statement of principles and six strategic commitments to guide the City in its diverse interactions with the Sector.  Application of the principles and commitments will take different forms, depending on the nature of the work. The Report also recommends sixteen specific actions to enhance existing or create new support mechanisms for the City to relate with the Sector in alignment with the strategic commitments.

 

Proposed vision, objectives, principles, and commitments are presented in Appendix 1.  Proposed actions are presented in Appendix 2. The full report on stakeholder consultations and the literature review is attached as Appendix 3.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 7, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A on For Public Benefit: Whole-of-Government Framework to Guide City of Toronto Relationships with the Community-Based Not-for-Profit Sector
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-108762.pdf)

Appendix 1 - Proposed Framework: Vision, Objectives, Principles; Commitments and Appendix 2 - Proposed Actions
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-108813.pdf)

Appendix 3 - Literature Review and Community Sector Consultations Report (Prepared by Social Planning Toronto)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-108814.pdf)

Speakers

Rob Howarth, Toronto Neighbourhood Centres


CD24.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

2017 Allocations Recommendations for Local Champions and Organizational Mentor Pilot Programs
Committee Recommendations

The Community Development and Recreation Committee recommends that:  

 

1.  City Council approve the total amounts for the Community Investment Funding program activities from the 2017 Approved Operating Budget for Social Development, Finance and Administration as follows:

 

a. Total funding of $175,000 in 2017 to a not-for-profit organization for the Local Champions program; and

 

b. Total funding of $125,000 to a not-for-profit community organization for the Organizational Mentor program.

 

2.  City Council approve the Local Champions program to continue for an additional four years within the Capacity Building grant stream, subject to the approved budget for Social Development, Finance and Administration.

 

3.  City Council authorize the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration to allocate 2017 Capacity Building grants to eligible community organizations for the Local Champions and Organizational Mentor programs.

 

4.  City Council request the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration to report back to the Community Development and Recreation Committee on selected recipients of the Local Champions and Organizational Mentor programs as part of the 2018 grants allocation recommendations report.

Origin
(November 6, 2017) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration
Summary

In March 2017, City Council approved three new grant programs: Community Projects and Events grants, Neighbourhood Grants, and Capacity Building grants. This report highlights the preliminary results from the Capacity Building pilot programs, and the staff recommendation for continued funding that will benefit resident leaders and grass roots youth-led groups from vulnerable and underserved communities. Results from community sector consultations will inform a comprehensive funding model for the Capacity Building stream that will be brought forward for Council approval in the first quarter of 2018.

 

Local Champions Pilot program was approved in 2016 for a $200,000 grant to pilot a certificate/college credit training program for residents from Neighbourhood Improvement Areas (NIAs) to advance Council approved Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy 2020 (TSNS 2020) and the Toronto Poverty Reduction Strategy. The Organizational Mentors Pilot program was approved in 2016 for a $150,000 grant to pilot and evaluate a funding model to deliver capacity building supports for City-funded grassroots groups, specifically to youth-led projects funded through the Identify 'N Impact (INI) grant program.

 

To date the Local Champions Pilot program created a made-in-Toronto training curriculum based on a successful model from Hamilton, established partnerships with post-secondary institutions, and trained and recruited twenty-two (22) community leaders who have received sixty-five (65) hours of training and subsequently hosted twenty-one (21) events reaching more than seven hundred (700) residents. Before the end of the year twenty (20) local champions will be certified as Community Facilitators.

 

Preliminary results from the Organizational Mentor program show that all INI grant recipients are well positioned to successfully complete their funded projects as envisioned. Furthermore, over 20 youth leaders have received over 100 one-on-one supports and are likely to feel more supported, and more confident in their ability to successful participate in a community based group when given a supportive environment where young people can engage on a common issue with their peers.

 

This report recommends the following 2017 allocations from the Community Investment Fund within the Capacity Building funding stream that will augment a multi-pronged approach currently under development:

 

-  $175,000 allocation to the Local Champions Pilot program. Local Champions is specifically designed for residents from Neighbourhood Improvement Areas and Emerging Neighbourhoods to advance the Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy 2020 and the Toronto Poverty Reduction Strategy; with this program participants will receive a certificate/college credit.  Staff recommends for the program to continue beyond the pilot phase for an additional four (4) years.

 
-  $125,000 allocation to the Organizational Mentor Pilot program. The program builds and sustains youth leadership through comprehensive organizational mentorship, and supports grassroots groups by offering capacity building training. Staff recommends funding the program for four (4) years, with the next year devoted to  exploring resources needed to ensure an effective organizational mentorship model for City's funded grassroots youth groups.
 

Grants help the City of Toronto achieve its social, economic and cultural goals for its residents. The City's goals are better achieved by supporting the work of organizations that are closer to the communities they serve.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 6, 2017) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration on 2017 Allocations Recommendations for Local Champions and Organizational Mentor Pilot Programs
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-108769.pdf)

Speakers

Feroza Mohammed, East Scarborough Storefront Tides, Steering Committee for the Local Champions Pilot Project 2016-2017
Balili Fazilatun Nessa, East Scarborough Storefront Tides

Communications (Committee)
(November 20, 2017) Submission from Feroza Mohammed, Steering Committee for the Local Champions Pilot Project 2016-2017 (CD.New.CD24.5.1)

CD24.6

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Community Investment Fund: Identify 'N Impact (INI) Grant Allocation Recommendations
Committee Recommendations

The Community Development and Recreation Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve total funding of $100,000 allocated from the 2017 Identify 'N Impact Investment (INI) Program to ten youth-led projects, as recommended in Appendices A and B to the report (October 31, 2017) from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration, from the 2017 Approved Operating Budget for Social Development, Finance and Administration.

Origin
(October 31, 2017) Report from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration
Summary

This report recommends approval of the following grants from Community Investment Funding, Identify and Impact (INI) youth-led Grant:

 

Of seventy-three (73) eligible submissions from youth-led groups to the Identify 'N Impact (INI) program, twenty-six (26) were shortlisted by a youth panel to proceed to the second stage of the application process. Ten (10) projects are recommended by a panel of youth for a total of $100,000 in funding.

 

Information is also provided in this report about the Mental Health Skill Building Grant for Youth Workers and Community Leaders, which will strengthen the capacity of youth workers and community leaders to respond to the mental health needs of vulnerable youth and their families in support of the Toronto Youth Equity Strategy (TYES).

 

Grants help the City of Toronto achieve its social, economic and cultural goals for its residents. The City's goals are better achieved by supporting the work of organizations that are closer to the communities they serve.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 31, 2017) Report and Appendix A from the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration on Community Investment Fund: Identify 'N Impact (INI) Grant Allocation Recommendations
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-108770.pdf)

Appendix B - 2017 Summary of Projects Recommended for Funding - Identify 'N Impact (INI)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-108771.pdf)

Appendix C - 2017 Shortlisted Projects Recommended for Decline - Identify 'N Impact (INI)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-108772.pdf)


CD24.7

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

2018 Shelter Infrastructure Plan and Progress Report
First Item on Wednesday, December 6th

Communications CD24.7.7 to CD24.7.12 have been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Community Development and Recreation Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to include in the 2018 Shelter Infrastructure Plan the opening of 1,000 new shelter beds (rather than drop-in beds) to meet the standard of 90 percent shelter occupancy across all sectors, which includes low-threshold, harm reduction focused shelters.

 

2.  City Council approve the 2018 Shelter Infrastructure Plan, set out in Attachment 3 to the report (November 10, 2017) from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, and amended by Recommendation 1 above.

 

3.  City Council authorize the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration to enter into agreements, as required, to implement shelters outlined in the 2018 Shelter Infrastructure Plan, set out in Attachment 3 to the report (November 10, 2017) from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, and amended by Recommendation 1 above.

 

4.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager Cluster A,  in consultation with the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, the General Manager, Shelter Support and Housing Administration, the Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration and the Director, Real Estate Services, to approve specific sites for emergency shelters, as per Attachment 2 to the report (November 10, 2017) from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, provided that:

 

a.  the funding for these sites is within the capital and operating budgets approved by City Council;

 

b.  the shelter project has been approved by Council through the annual shelter infrastructure plan; and

 

c.  the location meets the requirements of the Municipal Shelter Bylaw 138-2003 and applicable zoning by-laws.

 

5.  City Council replace the remaining elements of its existing Due Diligence Process for assessing new shelter sites with the new Emergency Shelter Development Process (ESDP) set out in Attachment 1 to the report (November 10, 2017) from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration.

 

6.  City Council direct the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to identify a site for a new family-specific year-round 24-hour drop-in and referral centre, and report to the Community Development and Recreation Committee in the first quarter of 2018.

 

7.  City Council direct the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to work with the Local Health Integration Networks (LHIN), to include consistent  medically-focused case management across the spectrum of drop-ins and shelters as a performance measure.

 

8.  City Council request the Province of Ontario to immediately increase health service supports administered through the Local Health Integration Networks (LHIN), to the City of Toronto's shelter system.

 

9.  City Council request the Mayor to use his authority under the Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 59, Emergency Management, to declare an emergency exists with respect to the City's shelter system and direct that a response be created that allows for additional temporary shelter space for men and women, including trans-accessible beds, to be opened by the end of 2017 to protect the health, safety and welfare of our most vulnerable residents for the duration of the emergency.

 
10.  City Council request the Mayor to work with the City Manager to find the necessary funding to support the creation of additional temporary shelter space for the duration of the emergency.
 

11.  City Council request the Mayor to contact the Federal Government through the Prime Minister and the Minister of National Defense to open emergency shelters at the Fort York Armoury and the Moss Park Armoury for the duration of the emergency.

 
12.  City Council request the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to reconsider the criteria used when assessing potential shelter sites with an objective of creating new temporary shelter spaces and re-examine the 64 properties assessed as part of the 2018 Shelter Infrastructure Plan and Progress Report that did not meet the requirements of Municipal Shelter By-law 138-2003 and/or applicable zoning by-laws under those new criteria for opportunities to add temporary shelter space in those locations for the duration of the emergency.

 
13.  City Council request the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to review opportunities for adding temporary shelter space in city-run winter respite centres for the duration of the emergency.

 
14.  City Council request the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to review opportunities for adding temporary shelter space after-programming hours in city-owned community and recreation centres for the duration of the emergency.

Origin
(November 10, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration
Summary

Emergency shelters are an essential part of the service responses to homelessness available in the city. In April of this year, City Council adopted a new community engagement process with respect to siting of municipal shelter locations outlined in a report (January 2017) tilted "Engaging Communities in First Step Housing and Services".  In its adoption of the new engagement process, Council directed staff to move forward on the implementation of the new process, including developing an implementation strategy for authorizing approval of specific sites for First Step Housing and Services to the General Manager, Shelter Support and Housing Administration (SSHA) provided that funding for the sites are within the Council approved operating and capital budgets. 

 

This report:

 

a) provides an update on the recommendations approved by Council in April of this year, including development of a new service model; update on pilot projects; communications and media campaign to build public awareness and understanding of the homelessness service system; and best practice shelter design guidelines;

 

b) outlines the 2018 Shelter Infrastructure Plan for Council approval and identifies new and replacement beds available between 2016-2018, to ensure that housing and shelter services are available and accessible to all residents in all parts of Toronto;

 

c) recommends a new property development approach to shelter infrastructure planning and approvals. The new approach is based on Council's direction from April, and the comprehensive review of the shelter approval process that identified the requirement for Council to approve specific emergency shelter locations is redundant when the required funds are approved in the division's annual budget, the shelter project has been approved through the annual service planning process, and the location meets the requirements of the municipal shelter by-law and zoning by-laws; and

 

d) provides an overview of the 10 year capital infrastructure growth plan being developed by staff in 2018.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 10, 2017) Report and Attachments 1 to 4 from the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration on 2018 Shelter Infrastructure Plan and Progress Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-108928.pdf)

Speakers

Rafi Aaron, Spokesperson, The Interfaith Coalition to Fight Homelessness
Derek George
Steve Meagher, Shelter Manager, Christie Refugee Welcome Centre
Kira Heineck, Executive Lead, Toronto Alliance to End Homelessness
Kapri Rabin, Executive Director, Street Health
Timothy Brown, Sound Times Housing Advocacy Committee
Peter Wlodarek, Sound Times Housing Advocacy Committee
Toby Nicol, Member, Advocacy Committee
Calvin Henschell, Community Outreach Worker, Regent Park Community Health Centre
Patricia O'Connell, Executive Director, Sistering
Paul Dowling, Project Manager, HomeComing Community Choice Coalition
Tim Maguire, President, Canadian Union of Public Employees CUPE Local 79
Cathy Crowe, Street Nurse, Visiting Practitioner, Ryerson
Gaetan Heroux, Ontario Coalition Against Poverty
Councillor Paul Ainslie

Communications (Committee)
(November 17, 2017) Letter from Steve Meagher, Shelter Manager, Christie Refugee Welcome Centre (CD.New.CD24.7.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/comm/communicationfile-73970.pdf)

(November 17, 2017) Submission from Tim Maguire, President, Canadian Union of Public Employees CUPE Local 79 (CD.New.CD24.7.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/comm/communicationfile-73957.pdf)

(November 17, 2017) Submission from Katrina Miller, Strategic Communications and Campaigns, Canadian Union of Public Employees CUPE Local 79 (CD.New.CD24.7.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/comm/communicationfile-73959.pdf)

(November 20, 2017) Letter from Kira Heineck, Executive Lead, Toronto Alliance to End Homelessness  (CD.New.CD24.7.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/comm/communicationfile-73981.pdf)

(November 20, 2017) Submission from Rafi Aaron, Spokesperson, The Interfaith Coalition to Fight Homelessness (CD.New.CD24.7.5)
(November 20, 2017) Submission from Toby Nichol (CD.New.CD24.7.6)
Communications (City Council)
(November 21, 2017) E-mail from Brad Jones (CC.Main.CD24.7.7)
(December 1, 2017) E-mail from Smadar Carmon (CC.Supp.CD24.7.8)
(December 4, 2017) Submission from Roxie Danielson on behalf of the Street Nurses Network (CC.New.CD24.7.9)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74363.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Steve Gillis (CC.New.CD24.7.10)
(December 5, 2017) Letter from Doris Grinspun, Chief Executive Officer, Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario (CC.New.CD24.7.11)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74392.pdf)

(November 1, 2017) Submission from Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, Ward 27 Toronto Centre - Rosedale  (CC.New.CD24.7.12)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74390.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) Petition from Councillor Joe Cressy, Ward 20, Trinity-Spadina, headed "Open the armouries for shelter", containing the names of approximately 3,000 persons, filed during the Routine Matters portion of the meeting (CC.New)
(December 5, 2017) Petition from Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, Ward 27, Toronto Centre-Rosedale, headed "Open the armouries for shelter", containing the names of approximately 3,000 persons, filed during the Routine Matters portion of the meeting  (CC.New)
(December 5, 2017) Petition from Councillor Gord Perks, Ward 14, Parkdale-High Park, headed "Open the armouries for shelter", containing the names of approximately 3,000 persons, filed during the Routine Matters portion of the meeting  (CC.New)
(December 5, 2017) Petition from Councillor Janet Davis, Ward 31, Beaches-East York, headed "Open the armouries for shelter", containing the names of approximately 3,000 persons, filed during the Routine Matters portion of the meeting  (CC.New)
(December 5, 2017) Petition from Councillor Neethan Shan, Ward 42, Scarborough-Rouge River, headed "Open the armouries for shelter", containing the names of approximately 2,000 persons, filed during the Routine Matters portion of the meeting  (CC.New)
(December 5, 2017) Petition from Councillor Sarah Doucette, Ward 13, Parkdale-High Park, headed "Open the armouries for shelter", containing the names of approximately 4,000 persons, filed during the Routine Matters portion of the meeting  (CC.New)
(December 5, 2017) Petition from Councillor Mike Layton, Ward 19, Trinity-Spadina, headed "Open the armouries for shelter", containing the names of approximately 3,000 persons, filed during the Routine Matters portion of the meeting  (CC.New)

CD24.8

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Support for Proposed Welfare Reform
Committee Recommendations

The Community Development and Recreation Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council advise the Provincial Government that it supports the suite of changes recommended in the recent provincial report titled "Income Security: A Roadmap for Change", including recommendations to increase Ontario Works and Ontario Disability Support Program rates by 22 and 15 per cent respectively, and to improve the integration and accessibility of employment training and health care supports for low-income residents.
 

2.  City Council direct the General City Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration and the General Manager, Employment and Social Services to work with the City Manager to review these recommendations and identify alignment with their respective divisional plans.
 

3.  City Council request the City Manager to write to the Minister of Community and Social Services to inform her of the City's support for this initiative.
 

Origin
(November 20, 2017) Letter from Councillor Joe Mihevc, Ward 21, St. Paul's West
Summary

As the Province of Ontario develops a Poverty Reduction Strategy, the City of Toronto wants to support welfare reforms that are complementary to our own Poverty Reduction Strategy.

 

The report entitled Income Security: A Roadmap for Change outlines a comprehensive 10-year strategy to transform our current welfare system to better support people living in poverty. The report includes a plan that will create a provincial income floor that no resident would fall below. The bold plan envisions simpler, more accessible and integrated employment and training supports; access to prescription drugs, dental, vision, and hearing care services for all low income Ontarians; and affordable child care, a portable benefit and an assured income for people living with disabilities. The plan also focuses on particularly vulnerable populations, including families with children and seniors, and recommends an overall increase of 22 per cent to Ontario Works and 15 per cent to the Ontario Disability Support Program. 

 

In addition to addressing the program configuration, it also recommends that the Province develop a market-based measure that reflects the cost of a basket of goods, with prices that reflect regional differences to improve the adequacy of minimum income measures.

 

The support of these changes will improve the outcomes of our poverty reduction efforts at the City and will help to ensure that Toronto residents who access social assistance and ODSP are better positioned to navigate these services, so they can begin to achieve increased levels of social and economic inclusion.      

Background Information (Committee)
(November 20, 2017) Letter from Councillor Joe Mihevc, Ward 21, St. Paul's West, on Support for Proposed Welfare Reform
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-109260.pdf)


CD24.9

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Improving Data Collection Management of Toronto's Homeless Population
Committee Recommendations

The Community Development and Recreation Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct the General Manager, Shelter, Support and Housing Administration, to meet with the Toronto Political Advocacy Committee with the Medical Society at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto and other interested stakeholders and report to Community Development and Recreation Committee in the first quarter of 2018 on measures to improve tracking information on admission and discharge of homeless individuals in between shelters, respites and hospitals, and the tracking and reporting on in-house healthcare provision.

Origin
(November 20, 2017) Letter from Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, Ward 27, Toronto Centre-Rosedale
Summary

The health outcomes of the City's homeless population are staggeringly poor, with at least 70 reported people - an average of 1.8 people per week - dying outdoors, in shelters, social service agencies or hospitals in 2017. The Medical Officer of Health has noted that more than half of these deaths were individuals under the age 50 and that underreporting means the true number of people dying due to living with homelessness is likely higher. 

 

The Toronto Political Advocacy Committee, a group of students at the Medical Society at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, have engaged the City to advocate for better data collection and management. The committee suggests that Toronto should adopt a Homeless Management Information System (HMIS), similar to a system adopted in Calgary, Alberta. This HMIS model, the committee argues, allow for shelter staff to better collect data to identify needs, coordinate referrals to other services and provide opportunities for programmatic evaluation of services.

 

The General Manager of Shelter, Support & Housing has advised that the city's Shelter Management Information System is evolving, with changes being made to better collect data and track individuals who come into and move through the system as a core piece of work that staff are currently engaged in. He has expressed that he would be happy to meet with the Toronto Political Advocacy Committee to discuss their ideas on how to improve the Shelter Management Information System.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 20, 2017) Letter from Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam on Improving Data Collection Management of Toronto's Homeless Population
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cd/bgrd/backgroundfile-109247.pdf)


Economic Development Committee - Meeting 25
ED25.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

One Year Extension of Contribution Agreements for Cultural Grant Recipients
Committee Recommendations

The Economic Development Committee recommends that:

 

1.   City Council approve a one-year extension of contribution agreements, excluding 2018 funding allocation commitments which are subject to City Council approval, with the same terms and conditions, with each of the ten Major Cultural Organizations funding recipients: Art Gallery of Ontario; Canada's National Ballet School; Canadian Opera Company; Festival Management Committee [Toronto Caribbean Carnival]; National Ballet of Canada; Pride Toronto; Toronto Artscape Inc.; Toronto Festival of Arts, Culture and Creativity [operates as Luminato]; Toronto International Film Festival; and Toronto Symphony Orchestra; each of the six Local Arts Service Organizations: Arts Etobicoke; East End Arts; Lakeshore Arts; North York Arts; Scarborough Arts; and UrbanArts); and three Specialized Collections Museums: George R. Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art; Design Exchange; and Museum of Contemporary Art Toronto, to expire December 31, 2018.

 

2.   City Council direct that the contribution agreements be subject to the satisfaction of the General Manager of Economic Development and Culture, the City Solicitor and the Chief Financial Officer.  

 

3.   City Council direct all funding recipient organizations to continue to submit their annual funding requests through the City's annual operating grants programs.

Origin
(November 1, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Summary

This report recommends the extension of contribution agreements with cultural grant recipients for a period of one year from January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2018. All existing contribution agreements with the Major Cultural Organizations, the Local Arts Service Organizations and the Specialized Collections Museums expire December 31, 2017. These contribution agreements provide the terms and conditions of the use of funds. The agreements govern the use of funds in the operating activities of recipient organizations, and ensure public benefit, accountability, and transparency for the City. The actual amounts to be granted in the 2018 budget will still be subject to City Council approval.

 

City Council direction is sought for a one-year extension from January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2018, of current contribution agreements with the ten recipients of funding through the Major Cultural Organizations program: Art Gallery of Ontario; Canada's National Ballet School; Canadian Opera Company; Festival Management Committee (Toronto Caribbean Carnival); National Ballet of Canada; Pride Toronto; Toronto Artscape Inc.; Toronto Festival of Arts, Culture and Creativity (operates as Luminato); Toronto International Film Festival; and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra; six Local Arts Service Organizations: Arts Etobicoke, East End Arts, Lakeshore Arts, North York Arts, Scarborough Arts, and UrbanArts; and three Specialized Collections Museums: George R. Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art; Design Exchange; and Museum of Contemporary Art Toronto.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 1, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on One Year Extension of Contribution Agreements for Cultural Grant Recipients
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/bgrd/backgroundfile-108730.pdf)


ED25.4

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Advancing Broadband Infrastructure and Internet Connectivity
The General Manager, Economic, Development and Culture has submitted the maps referenced in Appendix A (ED25.4a)
Committee Recommendations

The Economic Development  Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct the Chief Information Officer and the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, in consultation with other City Divisions, Agencies and Corporations, to establish an interdivisional Internet Connectivity governance structure, comprised of a Working Group and Steering Committee. This governance structure will coordinate efforts, identify options and seek Council direction as required to improve access to affordable high-speed internet for all Toronto residents and businesses, and to ensure that City infrastructure and regulation evolves and aligns with improving technology standards.

 

2.  City Council direct the Chief Information Officer and General Manager, Economic Development and Culture to further analyze the digital divide by comparing socio-economic data, including from the 2016 Census, and available geographic broadband penetration data to help support the digital access goals of the City's Poverty Reduction Strategy.

 

3.  City Council direct the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, as part of the Division's business growth services, to work with Toronto businesses that have identified a lack of required high-speed broadband services to seek equipment upgrades and additional options from internet service providers, particularly in the City's employment areas.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

Joel Swaggerman, Fontur/MDB and Denis Stelatos, Fontur/MDB addressed the Committee.

Origin
(November 3, 2017) Report from the Chief Information Officer and the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Summary

The purpose of this report is to evaluate the current state of broadband infrastructure and internet services in Toronto, and to recommend the establishment of a collaborative process within the City to advance certain internet connectivity objectives. Specifically, the report lays out two primary connectivity objectives: that all Toronto businesses and residents, including those in low income households, have access to affordable high-speed internet, and that, where applicable, the City ensure its infrastructure is evolving to align with improved technology standards. In support of these objectives, the City should also maintain awareness of Public Sector broadband initiatives, leverage known good practices and provide input as appropriate.

 

Several recent Council decisions have directed staff to assess Toronto's wired and wireless broadband infrastructure and consider how the City can support internet access and affordability. Reliable high-speed internet is increasingly necessary for residents to access information and services, and for businesses to operate, expand and contribute to innovation-based economic development. Additionally, the ability of the City to adopt "smart" technology to help deliver services more effectively relies on the state of the physical enabling infrastructure.

 

This staff report builds on a background consultant study that concludes that Toronto has relatively good access to wired, wireless and Wi-Fi broadband. However, standard prices for wired and wireless internet across the city are likely unaffordable for low-income households, representing over 20 percent of Toronto's population. This has created a 'digital divide' among residents. Moving beyond the current situation benchmarked in the report towards the achievement of connectivity goals for all residents including low income households will require ongoing attention. As a first step, staff recommend the establishment of an interdivisional Internet Connectivity governance structure to consolidate knowledge about broadband issues, provide updates on key connectivity indicators, consult with Agencies and Corporations, and identify policy options and resource requirements.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 3, 2017) Report from the Chief Information Officer and the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Advancing Broadband Infrastructure and Internet Connectivity
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/bgrd/backgroundfile-108896.pdf)

Appendix A: Toronto Broadband Study - Prepared for the City of Toronto by FONTUR International Inc. and MDB Insight Inc. (October 2017)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/bgrd/backgroundfile-108897.pdf)

Background Information (City Council)
Maps referenced in Appendix A submitted by the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109832.pdf)


ED25.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Ensuring a Robust Hotel Supply to Strengthen Tourism
Communication ED25.5.1 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Economic Development Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council request the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, and the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, and other appropriate City Divisions to review the potential for the implementation of a hotel accommodation replacement policy and or strategy to protect the existing amount of hotel space in areas designated Mixed Use Areas and Regeneration Areas in the Official Plan.

Origin
(November 3, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Summary

A strong and vibrant tourism industry with a sufficient number of hotel rooms and meeting space is essential to the economic health of Toronto. In recent years a number of hotels have been redeveloped into residential condominiums, removing hotel supply from the market at about the same rate as new hotel properties have been coming on stream.

 

As a result, the number of available hotel rooms in the city of Toronto has stagnated since 2000. At the same time, room supply in the rest of the GTA has grown robustly. A number of factors contribute towards the lack of hotel room growth in Toronto, especially in the downtown area, such as high costs associated with building and operating a new hotel, better ROI for investments in alternative developments, and proliferation of short term rentals.

 

While the net total hotel room supply has been stagnant in the city of Toronto, tourism has been growing, which is confirmed by the hotel key performance indicators. At the same time hotel employment growth has been slower than the average for the city of Toronto.

 

The Meetings, Convention and Incentive Travel (MCIT) market segment is by far the most lucrative tourism-related sector. Competition among cities for major conventions is intense. The ability to attract large business events depends on a reliable supply of hotel rooms concentrated in close proximity to one another. The potential impact of a reduced hotel room capacity in certain locations such as in the downtown exacerbates existing issues related to the reduced room blocks being made available. This may affect Toronto's ability to bid for large scale events that bring in significant economic benefits for the city.

 

The Toronto Official Plan supports the hotel industry by providing short, medium and long term opportunities for hotels and convention space in strategic locations in Toronto and enables the industry to locate, operate, expand, evolve and adapt to its market over time.

 

Given the net flat growth of hotel developments in the city and the desire to grow the MCIT sector by attracting lucrative conventions and conferences, it is proposed that EDC, City Planning and other partners review the potential for the implementation of a hotel accommodation replacement policy and or strategy to protect the existing supply of hotel space in designated Mixed Use Areas and Regeneration Areas in the Official Plan.

 

The proposed Downtown Plan policies resulting from the TOcore Secondary Plan study are currently out for public consultation. The proposed Secondary Plan contains policies to strengthen the hotel, tourism, hospitality and convention industries by prioritizing the development of non-residential uses which include hotel facilities in an expanded Financial District and in a new Health Sciences District. Council will be considering the recommended Secondary Plan in the second quarter of 2018.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 3, 2017) Report and Attachment A from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Ensuring a Robust Hotel Supply to Strengthen Tourism
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/bgrd/backgroundfile-108767.pdf)

Speakers

Patricia Campbell
Ernest Cohen, Concierge, Weston Prince Hotel
David Anderson
Victor Jimenez, Courtyard by Marriott
Louie Naccurato, Courtyard Hotel

Communications (City Council)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Matt Caissie (CC.New.ED25.5.1)

ED25.6

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Potential Policies and Programs to Support Toronto's Retail Areas and Appointments to the Oakwood Village Business Improvement Area
Committee Recommendations

The Economic Development Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct the General Manager of Economic Development and Culture, in consultation with the Chief Engineer and Executive Director of Engineering and Construction Services, the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the City Solicitor to report to Executive Committee in the second quarter of 2018 on a construction mitigation program to support small businesses on retail main streets affected by major infrastructure projects.

 

2.  City Council direct the continuation of the Program to Promote Economic Revitalization through Local Capacity Building.

 

3.  City Council direct the General Manager of Economic Development and Culture, in consultation with the Acting Chief Financial Officer and the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director City Planning to conduct a study of the current state and future of Toronto's retail main streets and potential policies and programs to support small retail businesses in these areas and report back in the second quarter of 2018 on the results of the retail study and policies and programs that could support small, independent businesses in Toronto.

 

4.  City Council direct the General Manager of Economic Development and Culture to consult with small, independent retailers and the Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas (TABIA) on the initiatives described in this report.

 

5.  City Council in accordance with the City's Public Appointments Policy, appoint the following nominees to the Oakwood Village Business Improvement Area Board of Management at the pleasure of City Council, and for a term expiring at the end of the term of Council or as soon thereafter as successors are appointed:

           

Mark Zwicker

Dr. Carol Tannis

Paulette Di Renzo

Nirmala Shettigar

Mauricio Jimenez

Suzy Batista

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Economic Development Committee:

 

1.   Requested the General Manager of Economic Development and Culture  to review potential city supports for Pedestrian Sundays in Kensington Market.

Origin
(November 6, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Summary

This report responds to several Council directions relating to economic hardships faced by small, independent businesses on Toronto's main streets.  The economic viability of small independent businesses is under threat from a number of sources including high property assessment growth and double-digit rent increases imposed on retail, high vacancy rates, increased competition from on-line shopping and chain-stores, and business closures, lost sales and retail area decline triggered by disruptions associated with construction of major infrastructure projects.  As a result, the ability of our main streets to perform their primary economic commercial function is also threatened.

 

Economically, culturally and socially, the City's retail main streets are where new entrepreneurs start their first business; where well-seasoned entrepreneurs experiment with new business models; and where residents of and visitors to the City shop, dine, celebrate, congregate and recreate.  Thriving, vital retail main streets are centres of employment, economic activity, cultural expression and social diversity, and are integral to the economic, social, and physical well-being of the local neighbourhoods they serve. Small independent retail businesses are critical to the on-going vibrancy and economic viability of the City's retail main streets.

 

The recommended strategy to address these challenges and others has three components:

 

1. An investigation of options to expand the range of economic and other supports for businesses that are negatively impacted by major construction projects.  The objective of the construction mitigation program will be to establish a pre-determined, or "ready-to-go" menu of divisional and agency initiatives, many of which are already in practice and can be augmented by other initiatives that can be applied to areas disrupted by major infrastructure improvement activities in a timely fashion to help minimize the negative economic impacts of construction.

 

2. Continuation of the "Program to Promote Economic Revitalization through Local Capacity Building", which was piloted over the past two years and is part of the City's Poverty Reduction Strategy.

 

3. A study on the current state and future of the City's retail main streets in order to more fully understand the threats to small, independent businesses and to explore program and policy responses that can assist them.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 6, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Potential Policies and Programs to Support Toronto Retail Areas
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/bgrd/backgroundfile-108775.pdf)

Attachment No. 1 - Oakwood-Vaughan Economic Revitalization Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/bgrd/backgroundfile-108778.pdf)

Attachment No. 2 - Rogers Road Economic Revitalization Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/bgrd/backgroundfile-108779.pdf)

Communications (Committee)
(November 16, 2017) Letter from Maureen Sirois, Chair, The Eglinton Way, Business Improvement Area (ED.New.ED25.6.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/comm/communicationfile-73916.pdf)

(November 16, 2017) Letter from Councillor Josh Colle and Councillor Cesar Palacio (ED.New.ED25.6.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/comm/communicationfile-73917.pdf)

(November 16, 2017) Letter from John Kiru, Executive Director, Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas (ED.New.ED25.6.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/comm/communicationfile-73918.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) E-mail from Councillor Cesar Palacio (ED.New.ED25.6.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/comm/communicationfile-73964.pdf)

(November 17, 2017) Letter from Gay Stephenson, Community Economic Development Coordinator, WoodGreen Community Services (ED.New.ED25.6.5)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/comm/communicationfile-73968.pdf)


ED25.7

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:1, 14, 15, 17, 19, 20, 27, 29, 30 

Business Improvement Areas (BIAs) - 2018 Operating Budgets - Report No. 1
Committee Recommendations

The Economic Development Committee recommends that:  

 

1. City Council adopt and certify the 2018 recommended expenditures and levy requirements of the following Business Improvement Areas:

 

Business Improvement Area

2018 Expenditure Estimates ($)

2018 Levy Funds Required ($)

Albion Islington Square

260,644

197,141

Chinatown

1,017,794

453,717

Church-Wellesley Village

321,664

249,084

Fairbank Village

286,403

272,645

Little Italy

527,392

380,455

Oakwood Village

34,830

10,600

Parkdale Village

303,121

260,378

Riverside District

233,350

192,722

The Danforth

376,266

313,603

Origin
(November 3, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Financial Officer
Summary

This report brings forward Business Improvement Area (BIA) annual operating budgets for approval by City Council as required by the City of Toronto Act, 2006.  City Council approval is required to permit the City to collect funds through the tax levy on behalf of the BIAs.

 

Complete budgets and supporting documentation received by October 19, 2017 have been reviewed and are reported here. BIA Operating Budgets received after this date will be brought forward in later reports. Of the 82 established BIAs, 9 BIA budgets are submitted for approval in this report, and 1 BIA, Historic Queen East, is inactive.

 

The recommendations in this report reflect 2018 Operating Budgets approved by the respective BIAs’ Boards of Management and have been reviewed by City staff to ensure BIA budgets reflect Council’s approved policies and practices.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 3, 2017) Report and Appendices A and B from the Acting Chief Financial Officer on Business Improvement Areas (BIAs) - 2018 Operating Budgets - Report No. 1
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/bgrd/backgroundfile-108726.pdf)


ED25.8

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:18 

Intention to Expand Bloordale Village Business Improvement Area
Committee Recommendations

The Economic Development Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council state its intention to designate the area described by Attachment 1 to the report (October 27, 2017) from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, as an expanded Business Improvement Area (BIA) under Chapter 19 of the City of Toronto Municipal Code.

 

2.  City Council direct the City Clerk to send out a notice of City Council's intention to pass a by-law designating the area described by Attachment 1 to the report (October 27, 2017) from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, as the expanded Bloordale Village Business Improvement Area (BIA), in accordance with Chapter 19 of the City of Toronto Municipal Code.

 

3.  City Council direct the Chief Information Officer of Information and Technology to prepare designation by-law maps of the area as described by Attachment 1 to the report (October 27, 2017) from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, and submit them to the City Solicitor.

Origin
(October 27, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Summary

The purpose of this report is to recommend that the City Clerk conduct a poll to determine if there is sufficient support to expand the boundaries of the Bloordale Village Business Improvement Area (BIA) as per Attachment No. 1.

 

Upon completion of the poll, the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture will report the results to the Economic Development Committee.  Subject to a positive poll result, staff shall prepare the necessary by-law and bills to give effect thereto.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 27, 2017) Report and Attachment 1 from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Intention to Expand Bloordale Village Business Improvement Area
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/bgrd/backgroundfile-108729.pdf)


ED25.14

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Toronto Economic Bulletin
Committee Recommendations

The Economic Development Committee recommends that:

 

1. City Council receive this report for information.

Origin
(November 3, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Summary

The attached Toronto Economic Bulletin summarizes the most recent data available for key economic indicators benchmarking the city's economic performance.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 3, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Toronto Economic Bulletin
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/bgrd/backgroundfile-108765.pdf)

(November 3, 2017) Toronto Economic Bulletin
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ed/bgrd/backgroundfile-108766.pdf)

Communications (Committee)
(November 17, 2017) E-mail from Sharon Yetman (ED.New.ED25.14.1)

Government Management Committee - Meeting 23
GM23.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Consolidation of Text of The Corporation of the City of York Employee Pension Plan
Bill 1426 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the introduction of a bill to:

 

a.  consolidate, to the satisfaction of the City Solicitor, all amendments since the last revision and consolidation of the text of The Corporation of the City of York Employee Pension Plan put in place by By-law 3349-96 of the former Corporation of the City of York, together with the further amendments described in the body of the report (October 30, 2017) from the Treasurer and City Solicitor;

 

b.  stipulate, to the satisfaction of the City Solicitor, that the text of the Plan as so consolidated is to be interpreted to reflect:

 

i.  that the City of Toronto has assumed all obligations of the former City of York as of January 1, 1998 under the Plan;

 

ii.  the retirement in 2004 of the last active member of the Plan; and

 

iii.  that the expectation as to indefinite continuation of the Plan set forth in section 17.01 of the Plan text is to be interpreted as being subject to the expectation of the forthcoming merger of the Plan into the OMERS Primary Plan; and

 

c.  repeal By-law 3349-96 of the former City of York.

Origin
(October 30, 2017) Report from the Treasurer and the City Solicitor
Summary

This report seeks authority to revise and re-enact the text of the by-law (currently Former City of York By-law 3349-96) governing The Corporation of the City of York Employee Pension Plan, which is now sponsored by the City as a result of the 1998 amalgamation.  The revision will take into account all amendments made since the last revision and re-enactment in 1996 and will also bring the text into harmony with the Plan's current administrative practices.  This re-enactment is a requirement of the Pension Transfer Agreement to be entered into between the City and OMERS for the merger of that Plan into the OMERS Primary Plan, as recently authorized by City Council, and will assist OMERS in implementing the merger.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 30, 2017) Report from the Treasurer and the City Solicitor on Consolidation of Text of The Corporation of the City of York Employee Pension Plan
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108478.pdf)


GM23.4

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Appeal Decision - Toronto District School Board v. Cogeco Data Services Inc.
Confidential Attachment - Litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board and the security of the property of the municipality or local board
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:  

 

1.  City Council adopt the confidential instructions to staff in Confidential Attachment 1 to the report (October 27, 2018) from the City Solicitor and the Chief Information Officer.

 

2.  City Council direct that the confidential information contained in Confidential Attachment 1 to the report (October 27, 2017) from the City Solicitor and the Chief Information Officer remain confidential in its entirety, as it is about litigation or potential litigation that affects the City or one of its agencies or corporations, and concerns the security of the property of the City or one of its agencies or corporations.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Government Management Committee recessed its public session to meet in closed session to consider this item as it relates to litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board and the security of the property of the municipality or local board.

Origin
(October 27, 2017) Report from the City Solicitor and the Chief Information Officer
Summary

At its meeting of July 15, 2008, City Council approved on a confidential basis the terms of a lit fibre data services agreement with Toronto Hydro Telecom Inc. ("THTI") in anticipation that the agreement would be assumed and performed by Cogeco Data Services Inc. ("CDSI") as the purchaser of THTI's assets.

 

As previously reported by the Chief Information Officer, delays to the completion of the build out of the Cogeco high speed WAN network have resulted in the City maintaining more of its data communications service requirements with Bell Canada than originally planned.

 

As a result of the delays, the Toronto District School Board, Toronto Catholic District School Board and the City of Toronto (the "Customers") requested an arbitration seeking a remedy for the failure by Cogeco to complete the network.  On Friday, June 23, 2017 the City of Toronto received notice of a decision (June 23, 2017) of the Superior Court of Justice dismissing the application of the Customers for leave to appeal the arbitrator's previous awards in this matter. 

 

The effect of the decision is that Cogeco is not required to construct the balance of the network, however it does not have the effect of terminating the WAN Agreement and the City continues to receive services from Cogeco for those sites which have been completed.

 

Staff require instructions from Council on an urgent basis and have therefore prepared this report to Council.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 27, 2017) Report from the City Solicitor and the Chief Information Officer on Appeal Decision - Toronto District School Board v. Cogeco Data Services Inc.
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108490.pdf)

Confidential Attachment 1 - Cogeco Appeal Decision - Confidential Comments

GM23.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:11, 20, 22, 42 

Properties leased by Real Estate Services - Designation of a Portion of Premises as a Municipal Capital Facility
Bill 1394 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council pass a by-law pursuant to section 252 of the City of Toronto Act, 2006, providing authority to:

 

a.  Enter into municipal capital facility agreements with the landlords of the following four properties:

 

160 Eglinton Avenue East, with respect to approximately 13,875 square feet of space leased by Real Estate Services on behalf of Social Development, Finance and Administration for the continued use as a community centre.

 

2 Murray Street, with respect to approximately 14,967 square feet of space leased by Real Estate Services on behalf of Shelter, Support, Housing and Administration for administration.

 

731 Runnymede Road, with respect to approximately 19,777 square feet of space leased by Real Estate Services on behalf of Shelter, Support, Housing & Administration for use as an emergency men's shelter.

 

1371 Neilson Road, with respect to approximately 820 square feet of space leased by Real Estate Services on behalf of City Councillor Neethan Shan for use as office space.

 

b. Exempt the Leased Premises from taxation for municipal and school purposes, which tax exemptions are to be effective from the latest of (i) the commencement date of the Lease, (ii) the date the municipal capital facility agreement is signed and (iii) the date the tax exemption by-law is enacted respectively.

 

2. City Council direct the City Clerk to give written notice of the respective by-laws to the Minister of Finance, the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation, the Toronto District School Board, the Toronto Catholic District School Board, the Conseil Scolaire de District du Centre-Sud-Ouest, and the Conseil Scolaire de District du Catholique Centre-Sud.

Origin
(October 25, 2017) Report from the Treasurer
Summary

This report seeks Council's authority for the adoption of necessary by-laws to designate four (4) properties leased by Real Estate Services and occupied by Social Development, Finance & Administration (SDFA), two properties by Shelter, Support, Housing & Administration (SSHA), and a City Councillor's office respectively as municipal capital facilities, and to provide property tax exemptions for municipal and education purposes. The municipal capital facility agreements will provide an exemption for approximately 49,439 square feet of combined space occupied for all 4 properties, located at 160 Eglinton Avenue East (Ward 22); 2 Murray Street (Ward 20); 731 Runnymede Road (Ward 11); and 1371 Neilson Road (Ward 42).

Background Information (Committee)
(October 25, 2017) Report from the Treasurer on Properties leased by Real Estate Services - Designation of a Portion of Premises as a Municipal Capital Facility
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108441.pdf)


GM23.8

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Feasibility of Requiring Gender Diversity of Corporation Boards in City Procurements
Communications GM23.8.1 and GM23.8.2 have been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council receive the report (October 30, 2017) from the Treasurer for information.  

Origin
(October 30, 2017) Report from the Treasurer
Summary

City Council directed staff to report back on the feasibility of requiring companies responding to procurement opportunities for City Businesses to have at least 30 percent gender diversity on their Boards of Directors including providing a jurisdictional review and conducting a public consultation with appropriate stakeholders.

 

As part of the Social Procurement Policy, the City recognizes that there is a role for the City's procurement process to play in promoting social equity goals, such as enhancing principles of gender equity and increasing business opportunities with the City for other equity-seeking groups such as youth, visible minorities, newcomers, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ2S, and indigenous people.  The Social Procurement Policy, an important component of the Poverty Reduction Strategy, is designed to improve access to procurement opportunities for those businesses that are certified diversely owned.

 

Staff are not recommending however, the implementation of a requirement that in order to do business with the City, a business would be required to have a board of directors with at least 30 percent gender diversity.  This is based on the following high level summary of reasons:

 

-  The City should continue to focus on the Social Procurement Policy which promotes access to the procurement process for diversely-owned businesses and is an important part of the Poverty Reduction Strategy versus a policy that creates additional requirements to do business with the City and is only focused on one type of business (corporations);

 

-  Having a requirement focused on one type of business (corporations) creates an unfairness in the competitive process and may reduce competition;

 

-  The legislative regime allows private corporations to be set up with only one person on its board of directors and there is no requirement for a private corporation to disclose its board composition;

 

-  The legislative regime allows public corporations to be set up with at least three people on a board, but does not require the board be made up of a particular composition.  Public corporations under the Ontario Securities Commission are required to provide a written policy relating to the identification and nomination of women directors on Boards or explain why they do not have such a policy. In addition, public corporations are also required to identify targets for appointing women to their Boards as well as explain annual and cumulative progress towards achieving those targets. If a company does not set targets., an explanation is required


-  There is currently no certifying organization that will validate a corporation's board composition.

 

-  Purchasing and Materials Management Division is in the process of implementing two large business transformation projects to modernize the procurement process to improve efficiency and to allow for more strategic and flexible approaches to procurement.  As a result, there is limited capacity to devote the time and effort required to help educate corporations on a new criterion to comply with gender diversity, to disclose gender diversity on their board, nor to develop the appropriate regime in order to validate whether businesses have met the new requirement.
 

As a result, staff believe it is more beneficial to continue investing the City's limited resources in growing the City's Social Procurement Program as the primary initiative for addressing social equity goals, including measuring and seeking to improve gender equity by increasing opportunities for women owned businesses to bid on City solicitations.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 30, 2017) Report and Appendix 1 from the Treasurer on Feasibility of Requiring Gender Diversity of Corporation Boards in City Procurements
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108498.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(December 1, 2017) E-mail from Peter J. Smith, Executive Director, Heavy Construction Association of Toronto (CC.Supp.GM23.8.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74304.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Sharon Yetman (CC.New.GM23.8.2)

GM23.9

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Proprietary Information Technology Maintenance and Support Contract Renewals and Amendments
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommend that:

 

1.  City Council approve an increase to the value of the six existing IT system maintenance contracts listed in Attachment A to the report (October 27, 2017) from the Chief Information Officer and the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management due to growth of maintenance and support requirements from evolving IT projects, for a total amount of $1,255,075, net of HST recoveries, for a period from January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2020, subject to Operating Budget approval in each year.

 

2.  City Council approve the renewal of nine previously unreported IT system maintenance contracts listed in Attachment B to the report (October 27, 2017) from the Chief Information Officer and the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management  due to upgraded software versions and required software module installations to accommodate the growing automated services that the City provides, or due to regular maintenance renewals to maintain the existing software and/or hardware, for a total amount of $129,598, net of HST recoveries, for a period from January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2020, subject to Operating Budget approval in each year.

 

3.  City Council authorize City Divisions and Information and Technology to negotiate amendments or extensions to the contracts identified in Attachment A to the report (October 27, 2017) from the Chief Information Officer and the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management, based on the increased contract amounts set out in recommendation 1 above, and to enter into agreements to renew or extend the contracts identified in Attachment B to the report (October 27, 2017) from the Chief Information Officer and the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management for a period of up to three years from January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2020, all in accordance with this staff report, City Policies and Procedures and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

Origin
(October 27, 2017) Report from the Chief Information Officer and the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management
Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek City Council authority to amend the dollar value of existing IT maintenance contracts listed in Attachment A that were reported under GM8.8 and GM16.7, and also previously unreported contracts as outlined in Attachment B, which will exceed the Chief Purchasing Official's authority of the cumulative five year commitment limit for each vendor under Article 7, Section 195-7.3 (D) of the Purchasing By-Law or exceed the threshold of $500,000 net of HST allowed under staff authority as per the Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 71- Financial Control, Section 71-11A.  The total amount identified in this report is $1,384,673 (net of HST recoveries).

 

In addition, this report clarifies that maintenance and support integrated into annual subscriptions of products and services are also covered by this report.

 

Furthermore, this report will align the commitment approval period with that of GM8.8, which is from January 1, 2016 to December 31, 2020, instead of seeking a different approval period. Proceeding with this approach will avoid overlapping of approval periods and will allow staff to consolidate any further renewal of all information technology systems proprietary contracts into one staff report before the current approval period ends on December 31, 2020.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 27, 2017) Report from the Chief Information Officer and the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management on Proprietary Information Technology Maintenance and Support Contract Renewals and Amendments
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108415.pdf)

Attachment A - Previously Reported Contract Renewals with Increases Required
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108416.pdf)

Attachment B - Previously Unreported Contract Renewals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108417.pdf)


GM23.10

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Request to Extend Contract No. 47017237 with Xerox Canada Limited
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommend that:

 

1.  City Council, grant authority to the Chief Information Officer to negotiate and execute an amending agreement with Xerox Canada Limited for a period of 12 months from December 31, 2017 to December 31, 2018, under the same pricing, terms and conditions of the existing agreement and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

Origin
(October 27, 2017) Report from the Chief Information Officer and the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management
Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek authority to extend the term of existing Blanket Contract No. 47017237 with Xerox Canada Ltd. for the supply of multi-function devices and printers and related maintenance and support services from December 31, 2017 for a period of 12- months ending December 31, 2018. No additional funds are required as a result of this time extension.

 

The Shared Services Executive Steering Committee (SSEC) mandated a joint procurement between the City of Toronto and all Agencies and Corporations for a new workgroup print services contract in order to leverage economies of scale and secure best pricing on supplies and services. This decision means the one year term extension is required to provide sufficient time to work with all Agencies and Corporations to gather requirements and to issue a single joint RFP. Preliminary requirements have been gathered and a separate procurement is being issued to retain a Fairness Monitor to work with the City, Agencies and Corporations.

 

The term extension is also required to ensure all City Divisions will continue to receive consumables supplies, maintenance, and related support services with no service interruption, while the joint procurement process is being undertaken.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 27, 2017) Report from the Chief Information Officer and the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management on Request to Extend Contract No. 47017237 with Xerox Canada Limited
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108404.pdf)


GM23.11

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Provision of the Supply, Delivery and First Year Maintenance and Support of Oracle Software Licences from Oracle Canada ULC
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council grant authority to the Chief Information Officer to negotiate and enter into a contract with Oracle Canada ULC for the supply, delivery and first year maintenance and support of new Oracle software licences for a five (5) year term effective January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2022, in the amount of $5,000,000, net of HST ($5,088,000 net of HST recoveries), on terms and conditions satisfactory to the Chief Information Officer and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

Origin
(October 30, 2017) Report from the Chief Information Officer and the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management
Summary

The purpose of this report is to request authority to negotiate and enter into a five (5) year non-competitive contract with Oracle Canada ULC for the supply, delivery and first year maintenance and support of proprietary Oracle software licences. The 5-year contract term will be effective January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2022. The estimated value of this procurement is in the amount of $5,000,000, net of HST ($5,088,000 net of HST recoveries).

 

The annual maintenance and support renewals will be done using the approval granted by Council under GM8.8 for Proprietary Information Technology Maintenance and Support Contracts 2016-2020.

 

City Council approval is required in accordance with Municipal Code Chapter 195-Purchasing, where the current request exceeds the Chief Purchasing Official's authority of the cumulative five year commitment limit for each vendor under Article 7, Section 195-7.3 (D) of the Purchasing By-Law or exceeds the threshold of $500,000 net of HST allowed under staff authority as per the Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 71- Financial Control, Section 71-11A.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 30, 2017) Report from the Chief Information Officer and the Director, Purchasing and Materials Management on Provision of the Supply, Delivery and First Year Maintenance and Support of Oracle Software Licences from Oracle Canada ULC
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108444.pdf)


GM23.12

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:36 

Land Donation Located at 107 Comrie Terrace
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the donation to the City from Clearwater Equity Leasehold Limited (the "Donor") of the property municipally known as 107 Comrie Terrace, Toronto, designated as Block 28 on the part of reference plan attached as Appendix C to the report (October 25, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, including future and ongoing obligations arising from the donation, as detailed in the Financial Impact Statement section of the report (October 25, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation.

 

2.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the Director, Real Estate Services to negotiate an Offer to Donate the property municipally known as 107 Comrie Terrace from Clearwater Equity Leasehold Limited substantially on the terms outlined in Appendix B to the report (October 25, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, and authorize severally each of the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the Director, Real Estate Services to accept the offer on behalf of the City.

 

3.  City Council, in accordance with the Donation Policy, direct that on completion of the offer to donate, a receipt for income tax purposes be issued by the City to the Donor in the amount of $46,000.00.

 

4.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to complete the transaction on behalf of the City including making payment of any necessary expenses, and amending the closing date and other dates to such earlier or later date(s) and on such terms and conditions as the City Solicitor may from time to time consider reasonable.

Origin
(October 25, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation
Summary

This report concerns a proposed donation to the City by Clearwater Equity Leasehold Limited (the "Donor") of the property municipally known as 107 Comrie Terrace in Toronto (the "Property"). The Property, which abuts City owned parkland is comprised of a vacant, triangular parcel of land located in a residential subdivision, the location of which is depicted in Schedule "A". The Property is approximately 242.8 square meters. This report seeks City Council's approval for the donation of the Property from the Donor to the City as required under the Policy on Donations to the City for Community Benefits (the "Donation Policy") described below, and to enter into an offer to donate with the Donor.

 

As proposed and outlined in this report, the donation of the Property will comply with the Donations Policy, and the terms of acquisition under the offer to donate are fair and reasonable.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 25, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Service and the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation on Land Donation Located at 107 Comrie Terrace
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108249.pdf)


GM23.13

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:1 

Acquisition of 925 Albion Road for Multi-Service Centre and Parkland Purposes
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services to enter into an agreement of purchase and sale with the Toronto Lands Corporation (the "Owner") to acquire 925 Albion Road (the "Property"), substantially on the terms outlined in Appendix A to the report (October 24, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Acting Chief Financial Officer, and such other terms and conditions and such related documents as may be acceptable to the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

 

2.  City Council amend the 2017 Council Approved Capital Budget for Facilities, Real Estate, Environment and Energy (FREEE) by adding a new capital project "925 Albion Road Multi-Service Centre and Parkland Acquisition " with total project cost of $10.507 million ($0.05 million in 2017, $10.457 million in 2018), representing the purchase price and associated costs as identified in Appendix A to the report (October 24, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A, for the acquisition of the property, to be funded $5.1 million from the Land Acquisition Reserve Fund (XR1012) allocated to the School Lands Acquisition Framework and $5.407 million from Parkland Acquisition - City-Wide Land Acquisition Fund (XR2210).

  

3.  City Council authorize severally each of the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the Director, Real Estate Services to execute the agreement on behalf of the City.

 

4.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services to administer and manage the transaction relating to the acquisition of the Property, including the provision of any consents, approvals, waivers and notices, provided that the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services may, at any time, refer consideration of any such matters (including their content) to City Council for its consideration and direction.

 

5.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to complete the transaction on behalf of the City, including paying any necessary expenses, amending the closing, due diligence and other dates and amending and waiving terms and conditions, on such terms as the City Solicitor considers reasonable.

Origin
(October 24, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Acting Chief Financial Officer
Summary

The purpose of this report is to obtain authority to acquire a 4.84 acre (1.96 ha) surplus Toronto District School Board property located at 925 Albion Road which is currently leased by the City for multi-service centre and parkland purposes.  The subject property to be acquired by the City is shown on Appendix B.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 24, 2017) Report and Appendices A and B from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Acting Chief Financial Officer on Acquisition of 925 Albion Road for Multi-Service Centre and Parkland Purposes
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108405.pdf)


GM23.14

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:14, 20, 30, 44 

Affordable Rental Housing - New Lease Agreements at 1313 Queen Street West, 125 Manse Road, 1177 King Street West, 156 and 158 Munro Street and 140, 163 and 164 Spadina Road
Confidential Attachment - The security of the property of the municipality or local board
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize a new affordable housing lease agreement with Toronto Artscape Inc. for the property known municipally as 1313 Queen Street West for a five- year term, substantially based on the terms and conditions outlined in Appendix 1 to the report (October 30, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and on such revised or other terms and conditions as may be acceptable to the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, or his or her designate and in a form acceptable to the City Solicitor.

 

2.  City Council authorize a new affordable housing lease agreement with Good Shepherd Non-Profit Homes Inc. for the property known municipally as 125 Manse Road for a five-year term, substantially based on the terms and conditions outlined in Appendix 2 to the report (October 30, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and on such revised or other terms and conditions as may be acceptable to the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, or his or her designate and in a form acceptable to the City Solicitor.

 

3.  City Council authorize a new affordable housing lease agreement with Madison Community Services for the property known municipally as 1177 King Street West for a five-year term, substantially based on the terms and conditions outlined in Appendix 3 to the report (October 30, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and on such revised or other terms and conditions as may be acceptable to the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, or his or her designate and in a form acceptable to the City Solicitor, and subject to the satisfactory resolution of the matter outlined in Confidential Attachment 1 to the report (October 30, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services.

 

4.  City Council authorize a new affordable housing lease agreement with Ecuhome Corporation for the property known municipally as 156 and 158 Munro Street for a five-year term, substantially based on the terms and conditions outlined in Appendix 4 to the report (October 30, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and on such revised or other terms and conditions as may be acceptable to the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, or his or her designate and in a form acceptable to the City Solicitor.

 

5.  City Council authorize a new affordable housing sublease agreement with the Homes First Society for the property known municipally as 140 Spadina Road for a five- year term, substantially based on the terms and conditions outlined in Appendix 5 to the report (October 30, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and on such revised or other terms and conditions as may be acceptable to the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, or his or her designate and in a form acceptable to the City Solicitor.

 

6.  City Council authorize a new affordable housing sublease agreement with the Homes First Society for the property known municipally as 164 Spadina Road for a five- year term, substantially based on the terms and conditions outlined in Appendix 5 to the report (October 30, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and on such revised or other terms and conditions as may be acceptable to the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, or his or her designate and in a form acceptable to the City Solicitor.

 

7.  City Council authorize a new affordable housing sublease agreement with Madison Community Services for the property known municipally as 163 Spadina Road for a five-year term substantially based on the terms and conditions outlined in Appendix 6 to the report (October 30, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and on such revised or other terms and conditions as may be acceptable to the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, or Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services' designate and in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

  

8.  City Council, pursuant to section 83(1) of the City of Toronto Act, 2006, deem the grant of the leases and subleases in the interests of the City.

 

9.  City Council authorize severally each of the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and the Director of Real Estate Services to execute such agreements identified in Recommendation Nos. 1 to 7 and any ancillary agreements and documents as required.

 

10.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to complete such agreements identified in Recommendation Nos. 1 to 7 and all related documentation as required, and to deliver any notices, pay expenses and amend the commencement, termination and other dates to such earlier or later date(s), on such terms as the City Solicitor, or designate, may from time to time determine.

 

11.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services or designate, to administer and manage the lease or sublease agreements referred to above, including the provisions of any consents, approvals, notices and notices of termination provided that the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services may, at any time, refer consideration of such matters (including their content) to City Council for its determination and direction.

 

12.  City Council authorize the public release of the information contained in Confidential Attachment 1 to the report (October 30, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services once the City has entered into the new affordable housing lease agreement outlined in Recommendation 3.

Origin
(October 30, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services
Summary

The purpose of this report is to obtain City Council authority to enter into new affordable rental housing lease agreements at 1313 Queen Street West, 125 Manse Road, 1177 King Street West, 156 and 158 Munro Street, and 140, 163 and 164 Spadina Road with each current respective non-profit affordable housing provider. These eight affordable rental housing properties include 48 rooms in multi-tenant housing and nine apartments which provide affordable rental accommodation to lower-income Torontonians.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 30, 2017) Report and Appendices 1 to 6 from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster A and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services on Affordable Rental Housing - New Lease Agreements at 1313 Queen Street West, 125 Manse Road, 1177 King Street West, 156 and 158 Munro Street and 140, 163 and 164 Spadina Road
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108484.pdf)

Confidential Attachment 1

GM23.16

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:38 

Expropriation of 1269 Danforth Road, Scarborough Subway Extension
Third Item on Wednesday, December 6th
Communication GM23.16.2 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council authorize the Director, Real Estate Services to negotiate the acquisition of the property known municipally as 1269 Danforth Road (the Property), depicted on the Property Sketch in Appendix A and as shown on the Location Map attached as Appendix B to the report (October 25, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and if the negotiations are unsuccessful, authorize staff to initiate the expropriation process for the Property.

 

2.  City Council grant authority to serve and publish Notices of Application for Approval to Expropriate the Property, to forward to the Chief Inquiry Officer any requests for hearing that are received, to attend the hearing to present the City's position and to report the Inquiry Officer's recommendations to City Council for its consideration.

Origin
(October 25, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services
Summary

The purpose of this report is to obtain authority to initiate expropriation proceedings at 1269 Danforth Road, (the "Property"), required for a traction power sub-station for the Scarborough Subway Extension ("SSE").

 

Staff will continue to negotiate terms of an agreement with the owner of the Property. However, if an agreement cannot be reached, expropriation may be necessary.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 25, 2017) Report and Appendices A and B from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services on Expropriation of 1269 Danforth Road, Scarborough Subway Extension
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108427.pdf)

Speakers

Derek Moran

Communications (Committee)
(November 9, 2017) E-mail from Sharon Yetman (GM.New.GM23.16.1)
Communications (City Council)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Sharon Yetman (CC.New.GM23.16.2)

GM23.17

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:24 

Expropriation of 13 Barberry Place and 23 Barberry Place for New East/West Road
Bill 1374 has been submitted on this Item.
Confidential Attachment - A proposed or pending acquisition or sale of land for municipal or local board purposes
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council, as approving authority under the Expropriations Act, approve the expropriation of 13 Barberry Place and 23 Barberry Place, as legally described in Appendix A and shown as Parts 1 and 2 on Sketch No. PS-2017-088 attached as Appendix B to the report (October 25, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the General Manager, Transportation Services.

 

2.  City Council authorize the City, as expropriating authority under the Expropriations Act, to take all necessary steps to comply with the Expropriations Act, including but not limited to, the preparation and registration of an Expropriation Plan and service of Notices of Expropriation, Notices of Election as to a Date for Compensation and Notices of Possession.

 

3. City Council amend the 2017 Council Approved Capital Budget for Transportation Services by the addition of a new capital project called "13 and 23 Barberry Place" for the costs as outlined in Confidential Attachment 1 to the report (October 25, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the General Manager, Transportation Services – Confidential Information, funded from Development Charge Reserve Fund Roads (XR2110).

 

4. City Council authorize the public release of the confidential information contained in Confidential Attachment 1 to the report (October 25, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the General Manager, Transportation Services once there has been a final determination of all claims for compensation for all of the Properties to the satisfaction of the City Solicitor.

Origin
(October 25, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the General Manager, Transportation Services
Summary

In December 2015, City Council authorized the initiation of expropriation proceedings for 13 and 23 Barberry Place, which are required for the new east/west road which will connect Rean Drive to Kenaston Gardens, in order to improve traffic flow and pedestrian connections.

 

This report seeks approval from City Council, as the approving authority under the Expropriations Act, to expropriate 13 Barberry Place and 23 Barberry Place. The required properties are shown as Parts 1 and 2 on Sketch No. PS-2017-088 attached as Appendix "B".

Background Information (Committee)
(October 25, 2017) Report and Appendices A to D from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services and the General Manager, Transportation Services
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108322.pdf)

Confidential Attachment 1

GM23.22

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Fair Wage Policy Compliance Verification - Aloia Brothers Concrete Contractors Ltd.
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct the Manager, Fair Wage Office to continue to retain the amount of $100,000 in withholding funds until July 2018, to allow Aloia Brothers Concrete Contractors Ltd., the Contractor, to provide the requisite information.

 

2.  City Council direct the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services to report to the July 3, 2018 Government Management Committee meeting on whether Aloia Brothers Concrete Contractors Ltd., the Contractor, should be disqualified from conducting business with the City for a period of two years and whether any legal entity that is related to or has the same operating mind (including successors or assigns) as Aloia Brothers Concrete Contractors Ltd. should be ineligible to bid on or be awarded City of Toronto contracts, acting as a General Contractor or Sub-contractor, for a two year period.

Origin
(October 30, 2017) Report from the Manager, Fair Wage Office
Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek direction, from Council with respect to continuing to withhold contract holdback from a contractor or subcontractor when payroll records are delinquent, inaccurate and cannot be verified.

 

The Fair Wage by-law allows the Manager, Fair Wage Office, to direct the operating division to hold back funds from the contractor's progress draw or holdback when contractors fail to furnish and disclose certified pay sheets, lists, records, time sheets, open at all times for examination of wages of workers in connection with City contracts.

 

A case has arisen where true payroll documentation cannot be verified, the contractor has been determined to be non-compliant with disclosure requirements and hold back of funds has been exercised by the client division on instruction from the Manager, Fair Wage Office.

 

These funds which are on hold are without by-law direction to address, in these circumstances, how long and what happens to these funds in order to conclude the compliance investigation.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 30, 2017) Report from the Manager, Fair Wage on Fair Wage Policy Compliance Verification - Aloia Brothers Concrete Contractors Ltd.
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108507.pdf)

Speakers

Anna Ferzoco McMahon, President, Ferpac Paving Inc.
Pina Aloia, Contract Administrator, Aloia Brothers Concrete Contractors Ltd.


GM23.23

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Pegah Construction Ltd. - Disqualification from City Contracts, Fair Wage Policy Non-Compliance
Committee Recommendations

The Government Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.   City Council direct that Pegah Construction Ltd. be placed on probation for a period of one year from the date of City Council's decision.

Origin
(October 30, 2017) Report from the Manager, Fair Wage Office
Summary

As directed by Council, Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 67, instructs the Manager, Fair Wage Office to take disqualification action when a contractor or any sub-contractor is found to be in non-compliance with the provisions of the Fair Wage Policy in two separate instances over a period of three years.

 

This report recommends disqualification of Pegah Construction Ltd. or related entities from conducting business with the City for a period of two years for failure to pay its workers in accordance with fair wage policy requirements.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 30, 2017) Report from the Manager, Fair Wage on Pegah Construction Ltd. - Disqualification from City Contracts, Fair Wage Policy Non-Compliance
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-108663.pdf)

Speakers

Ali Mohtashami, President, Pegah Construction Ltd. / Format Group Inc.

Communications (Committee)
(November 9, 2017) Letter from Ali Mohtashami, President, Pegah Construction Ltd.  (GM.New.GM23.23.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/gm/comm/communicationfile-73608.pdf)


Licensing and Standards Committee - Meeting 23
LS23.1

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Licensing and Registration Regulations for Short-Term Rentals
Communications LS23.1.67 to LS23.1.171 have been submitted on this Item.

To be considered with Item PG24.8 as first Items on Thursday, December 7th
Public Notice Given
Committee Recommendations

The Licensing and Standards Committee recommends that:

 

New By-law

 

1.  City Council establish a separate Toronto Municipal Code Chapter for short-term rentals, in accordance with the recommendations in the report (November 14, 2017) from the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards.

 

Definitions

 

2.  City Council define the following terms in the short-term rental By-law:

 

a.  A short-term rental company is any person in the business of facilitating or brokering bookings for short-term rentals via the internet and who:

 

1.  Receives payment, compensation, or any other financial benefit as a result of a person making or completing bookings of those short-term rentals; or

 

2.  Collects, accesses, or holds information on the number of nights that bookings of those short-term rentals are made or completed.  

 

This definition does not apply to a person who facilitates or brokers bookings for a short-term rental owned by that person or his or her immediate family. "Person" includes multiple persons who act together to carry on the business of a short-term rental company, despite the fact that no single one of those persons carries on the activity in its entirety. Such persons shall be subject to the requirements and may be held jointly and severally responsible for each other's actions.

 

b.  A short-term rental is all or part of a dwelling unit in the City of Toronto used to provide sleeping accommodations for any rental period that is less than 28 consecutive days in exchange for payment. This includes existing bed and breakfasts and excludes hotels and motels and accommodations where there is no payment.

 

c.  An operator is any individual person (owner or tenant) who operates a short-term rental. Operators must be 18 years of age or older. Corporations cannot be operators.

 

d.  A principal residence is a dwelling unit owned or rented by an individual person, alone or jointly with another person, where he or she is ordinarily resident.

 

e.  An entire-unit rental is a short-term rental in which the renter occupies an entire dwelling unit.

 

f.  A partial-unit rental is a short-term rental in which the renter occupies part of the dwelling unit.

 

Short-Term Rental Operator Registry

 

3.  City Council direct that short-term rental operators register with the City annually. Registration shall consist of paying an annual registration fee and providing the following information:

 

a.  Name, contact information (phone and email), address and identification of a type to be determined by the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards;

 

b.  Emergency contact information (name and phone number of a person available by phone 24 hours a day during rental);

 

c.  Description of which parts of the property will be used for short-term rental (entire unit, number of bedrooms, secondary suite, other shared space);

 

d.  Building type (condominium, apartment, detached, semi-detached, row house, townhouse, etc.); and

 

e.  Any other information or documents required by the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards.

 

Short-Term Rental Operator Requirements

 

4.  City Council direct that:

 

a.  No one shall operate or advertise any short-term rental that is not registered;

 

b.  Operators must include the City-issued registration number in any advertisement and in any invoice or contract related to the short-term rental;

 

c.  Operators must update the registry within six days of any changes to the information provided to the City;

 

d.  Operators must keep records of transactions related to every short-term rental listing for three years with the following details and provide this information to Municipal Licensing and Standards within 30 days of being requested to do so:

 

1.  Number of nights rented as a short-term rental;

 

2.  Rental type (entire unit, shared unit, or secondary suite); and

 

3.  Any other information as required by the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards.

 

e.  Operators must provide emergency contact information (reachable during guest stay) to all guests; and

 

f.  Operators must provide guests with a diagram of all exits from the building and 911 emergency contact information.

 

Principal Residence Requirements and Rental Limits

 

5.  City Council direct that short-term rental operators comply with the following:

 

a.  No operator shall rent or advertise for rent a short-term rental except at their principal residence;

 

b.  An operator can only have one principal residence at any time; and

 

c.  An operator must, upon request from Municipal Licensing and Standards, provide evidence that is satisfactory to the Executive Director within ten days that the property they have registered for short-term rental use is their principal residence.

 

6.  City Council direct that an operator shall not be permitted to operate an entire-unit rental for more than 180 nights per calendar year.

 

Refusing or Cancelling an Operator's Registration

 

7.  City Council direct that the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, can:

 

a.  Refuse or cancel a registration if the operator meets specific criteria developed by the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards. The criteria will be similar but not limited to the criteria summarized in the report (November 14, 2017) from the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards; or

 

b.  Exercise discretion to refuse or cancel a registration where the operator:

 

1.  Has not carried on the activity with integrity and honesty;

 

2.  Has violated any law or By-law;

 

3.  Is conducting activity in such a way that would infringe on the rights of other members of the public; or

 

4.  Has or would endanger the health or safety of other members of the public.

 

8.  City Council direct that the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, provide the operator with written notice that consideration is being given to the refusal or cancellation of the operator's registration, and that the operator have an opportunity to respond in writing to this notice within ten days of being notified. Municipal Licensing and Standards will then provide the operator with written notice of any decision to refuse or cancel the registration.

 

9.  City Council direct that an operator be provided with an opportunity to request, in writing, a second review of any decision to cancel their registration by the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, within 30 days of the decision. The Executive Director will consider the request for second review and inform the operator in writing of the decision made, which may affirm or change the original decision.

 

10.  City Council direct that where Municipal Licensing and Standards is reviewing whether to refuse or cancel an operator's registration, the process by which the decision is reached shall be in writing unless the operator requests an oral or electronic hearing and the Executive Director determines that there is a good reason to hold an oral or electronic hearing and, if so, by whom and how the hearing shall be conducted.

 

11.  City Council direct that, if an operator's registration has been refused or cancelled pursuant to this process, the operator cannot reapply to the registry for one year.

 

12.  City Council direct that the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, have the discretion to cancel a registration if the operator's registration was issued due to a technological or clerical error.

 

Short-Term Rental Company Licence

 

13.  City Council require all short-term rental companies to be licensed with the City. To apply for a short-term rental company licence, the company shall pay a licence fee and provide the following information:

 

a.  Name, phone number, and email address of a person responsible for responding to all City communications;

 

b.  A registered business address in Ontario; and

 

c.  Any other information or documents as required by the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards.

 

14.  City Council require companies keep transaction records of every short-term rental listing for three years with the following details and disclose this information to Municipal Licensing and Standards in a format and in accordance with a schedule determined by the Executive Director:

 

a.  Name, address, and registration number of the operator;

 

b.  Number of nights rented as a short-term rental;

 

c.  Rental type (entire unit, shared unit, or secondary suite); and

 

d.  Any other information as required by the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards.

 

15.  City Council require a company, upon request by Municipal Licensing and Standards, to convey any communications issued by the City that relate to the requirements of the short-term rental By-law to all operators advertising with the company in a format and manner determined by the Executive Director.

 

16.  City Council require that companies:

 

a.  Maintain and make publicly available their procedure for dealing with listings when complaints are received about nuisances, criminal activity, and/or contraventions of federal, provincial or municipal law; and

 

b.  Be prohibited from imposing a mandatory arbitration clause on individuals (operators and guests) using the company to facilitate or broker short-term rentals or requiring the law of any jurisdiction other than Ontario to be applied in relation to use of the company in Toronto. If clauses contrary to this requirement are included in any company agreement with individuals using its services, such clauses are unenforceable.

 

17.  City Council direct that the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, have the discretion to revoke, reject, or not renew a company's application for a licence if the licence was issued due to a technological or clerical error.

 

18.  City Council require companies to create operator and guest accounts for use by Municipal Licensing and Standards for enforcement purposes upon request by Municipal Licensing and Standards, and prohibit the company from obstructing access to those accounts.

 

Sharing Records between Short-Term Rental Companies and the City

 

19.  City Council direct that companies must, as a condition of licensing, execute an agreement with the City governing the collection, use, retention, and transmission of operator information on terms satisfactory to the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, and that the Executive Director shall have authority to execute such an agreement on the City's behalf.

 

20.  City Council direct that should a company choose to facilitate the operator registration process, it must obtain consent from operators applying for registration to the collection, use of, and potential disclosure of personal information to and by the City for the purposes permitted by the By-law, which consent must be in a form satisfactory to the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards.

 

General Licensing Provisions

 

21.  City Council direct that the short-term rental By-law import all relevant general provisions from the Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 545, Licensing, as necessary to be consistent with Chapter 545 and to operationalize the By-law. This includes providing authority for the Toronto Licensing Tribunal to suspend, revoke or refuse the issuance of a short-term rental company licence when appropriate.

 

22.  City Council delegate authority to the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, to suspend or place conditions on the short-term rental operator registration or company licence without a hearing for up to 14 days at her or his discretion if she or he has reasonable grounds to conclude that the continued activity of the operator or company poses an immediate danger to health or safety of any person or to property.

 

General Requirements for Advertising, Facilitating and Brokering Short-Term Rentals

 

23.  City Council direct that any person, including a corporation:

 

a.  Ensure that an operator's registration number is included in all short-term rental advertisements; and

 

b.  Remove all short-term rental advertisements that are not registered within 24 hours of notification from the City.

 

24.  City Council direct that no person, including a corporation, can advertise, facilitate or broker a short-term rental that is not registered with the City.

 

Registration and Licence Fees

 

25.  City Council amend Chapter 441 to include the following fees for the short-term rental By-law, as detailed in Attachment 1 of the report (November 14, 2017) from the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards:

 

a.  Operator annual registration fee: $50

 

b.  Company licence fee: one-time application fee of $5,000; fee of $1.00 per night booked

 

Fines

 

26.  City Council establish:

 

a.  That anyone who contravenes any provision of this By-law is guilty of an offence and upon conviction is liable to a fine of not more than $100,000.

 

b.  A system of fines that includes fines for continuing offences and special fines where it is determined that the conduct could have resulted in economic advantage or gain to the party found to have breached the By-law.

 

c.  That directors or officers of a corporation who knowingly concur in the contravention of any offence under the By-law are guilty of an offence.

 

Administration

 

27.  City Council direct that all communications between the City and operators and companies must be sent via email, except where another method is authorized by the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, in her or his sole discretion, and that any email shall be deemed to be received on the day it is sent to the most recent email address provided to Municipal Licensing and Standards as part of the licensing and registration process.

 

28.  City Council provide the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, the authority to:

 

a.  Issue interpretation bulletins or guidelines on matters relating to the short-term rental By-law; and

 

b.  Delegate any authority or function provided for in the short-term rental By-law to the Executive Director's designate.

 

29.  City Council require operators and companies submit to audits of their records as requested by the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards.

 

30.  City Council give the City Solicitor the authority to make technical and stylistic amendments as required in the drafting of this By-law.

 

Implementation

 

31.  City Council direct that the By-law come into effect June 1, 2018. If no zoning changes permitting short-term rentals are in force by June 1, 2018, the By-law will come into effect on the day any of the zoning changes come into force.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Licensing and Standards Committee also:

 

1.  Requested the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, to review the submissions and report directly to City Council on December 6, 2017 if she wishes to clarify or modify any recommendations as a result of her review.

 

The Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, and the Director of Zoning and Secretary-Treasurer, Committee of Adjustment, gave a presentation on Short-Term Rentals: Proposed Regulations for Toronto.

Origin
(November 14, 2017) Report from the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards
Summary

This report is one of three reports on short-term rental regulations being considered by City Council. This report recommends a registration and licensing program for short-term rental activity in Toronto. It recommends that anyone doing a short-term rental in their home must register with the City and any companies that facilitate short-term rental activity, like Airbnb, must be licensed.

 

The other two reports provide:

 

- Zoning changes to permit short-term rentals in principal residences across the city and in secondary suites - report considered at November 15, 2017, Planning and Growth Management Committee.

 

- Potential short-term rental tax - report expected at November 29, 2017, Executive Committee.
 

The recommended short-term rental regulations were developed based on the following principles: permit people to rent their homes for short periods; minimize negative impacts on housing affordability and availability; enable greater diversity in tourism accommodations; maintain community stability, including in vertical communities; minimize nuisances; and create regulations that are fair and easy for people and companies to follow.

 

This report recommends that a By-law governing short-term rentals be enacted to include that:

 

- People who want to advertise or offer short-term rentals in their homes must be registered with the City.


- People may rent their entire home while they are away for a maximum of 180 nights per year.

 

- People may share their home for an unlimited number of nights when renting up to three rooms and/or one secondary suite.


- People must post their City-issued registration number in all advertisements for their short-term rental.
 

To register a home for short-term rental use, the recommended By-law includes that people must:

 

- Provide basic information, such as contact information and address;


- Make a declaration that the address is their principal residence;


- Ensure that the property, including secondary suite, is in compliance with all applicable laws, including the Ontario Building Code and Ontario Fire Code (as applicable), and must make a declaration of such;


- Keep records of short-term rental activity and provide to City upon request;


- Provide emergency information to guests;


- Provide contact information for a person available by phone 24 hours a day; and


- Pay an annual registration fee of $50.
 

This report also recommends that short-term rental companies be licensed. Short-term rental companies would be required to:

 

- Ensure that all listings have a valid registration number;


- Develop a procedure to mitigate neighbourhood nuisances;


- Provide information about short-term rental activity with the City; and


- Pay a one-time licence application fee of $5,000 and a licensing fee of $1 for each night booked through the company.
 

The recommendations were developed based on input from the public and stakeholders in August and September 2017 on the regulations adopted for consultation by Executive Committee on June 19, 2017. Staff heard from 225 attendees at public open houses, 5,316 respondents to an online survey, 45 stakeholders at targeted stakeholder meetings, and 27 residents via email. This is in addition to the extensive research and consultation undertaken from October 2016 to May 2017 in preparation for the June 2017 report.

 

The following City divisions were consulted in the preparation of this report: Affordable Housing Office; Corporate Finance; Economic Development and Culture; Legal Services; City Planning; Shelter, Support and Housing Administration; Social Development, Finance and Administration; Toronto Fire Services; and Toronto Building.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 14, 2017) Revised Report from the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, on Licensing and Registration Regulations for Short-Term Rentals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/bgrd/backgroundfile-109052.pdf)

(November 7, 2017) Report from the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, on Licensing and Registration Regulations for Short-Term Rentals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/bgrd/backgroundfile-108682.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Additions to Municipal Code Chapter 441 Related to Fees for the Short-Term Rental Operator Registry and Company Licence
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/bgrd/backgroundfile-108808.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Jurisdictional Scan of Short-Term Rental Regulations
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/bgrd/backgroundfile-108809.pdf)

Public Notice on Licensing and Registration Regulations for Short-Term Rentals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/bgrd/backgroundfile-108812.pdf)

Presentation from the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards and the Director of Zoning and Secretary-Treasurer, Committee of Adjustment, on Short-Term Rentals: Proposed Regulations for Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/bgrd/backgroundfile-109151.pdf)

Speakers

Richard de Sam Lazaro, HomeAway Inc.
Caitlin O'Neill, Sonder
Ryan Killeen, Sonder
Alex Dagg, Policy Manager, Airbnb
Brian Anderson
Fariba Anderson, Chief Executive Officer, AcuteNet Inc.
Patrick Shaw
Hasnain Hasan, Manager, Toronto Furnished Living
Linda Brett, Bloor Street East Neighbourhood Association
Catherine Lang
Caroline Miller
Zach Mandlowitz, President, Home-Sharing Service Providers
Jennifer Graham
Melanie Ferreira, Melanie's Bistro
Douglas Goold, Vice President, Policy and Public Affairs, Toronto Region Board of Trade
Paul Nedoszytko
Jim Murphy, Chief Executive Officer, Federation of Rental-Housing Providers of Ontario
Jeremy Dias, Executive Director, The Canadian Centre for Gender and Sexual Diversity
Daryl Chong, Greater Toronto Apartment Association
Melissa Goldstein, Housing Action Now
Thorben Wieditz, Fairbnb.ca Coalition
Jessica Pisarek
Lisa Giansante
Emily Rayson, Chief Operating Officer, Canadastays
Robert Field, Graydon Hall Tenants' Association and the Federation of Metro Tenants' Association
Israel Quintero
Jeffrey Stern, Toronto Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now
Denise Lash, Lash Condo Law
Emily Daigle
Jacqueline Porter

Communications (Committee)
(November 8, 2017) E-mail from Brian Anderson (LS.New.LS23.1.1)
(November 9, 2017) E-mail from Tom Brewer (LS.New.LS23.1.2)
(November 9, 2017) Submission from Hasnain Hasan, Manager, Toronto Furnished Living (LS.New.LS23.1.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73604.pdf)

(November 10, 2017) Letter from Anne Hayes, Chair, The Torontonian Tenants' Association (LS.New.LS23.1.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73598.pdf)

(November 13, 2017) Letter from Christopher Brown (LS.New.LS23.1.5)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from J. Christopher Binney and Natalie Hodgins (LS.New.LS23.1.6)
(November 13, 2017) Letter from Patricia Marson Vaughan (LS.New.LS23.1.7)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Emanuele Silli (LS.New.LS23.1.8)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Chris Bracamonte (LS.New.LS23.1.9)
(November 13, 2017) Letter from Terry Mundell, President and Chief Executive Officer, Greater Toronto Hotel Association, and Tony Elenis, President and Chief Executive Officer, Ontario Restaurant Hotel and Motel Association (LS.New.LS23.1.10)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73794.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Teddy Ghalustians (LS.New.LS23.1.11)
(November 14, 2017) Submission from Lesley McAllister  (LS.New.LS23.1.12)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Claire Louise Gallagher (LS.New.LS23.1.13)
(November 14, 2017) Letter from Melissa Goldstein, Chair, Housing Action Now (LS.New.LS23.1.14)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73802.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) Letter from Peter Bangarth and Melanie Tait (LS.New.LS23.1.15)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Doris Power, Rosie DaSilva, Heather O'Neil, John Corso, and Jon Alexander, on behalf of Tenants for Social Housing (LS.New.LS23.1.16)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73822.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Vicki Trottier, President, Toronto Standard Condominium Corporation 2163 (LS.New.LS23.1.17)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Holly Aucoin (LS.New.LS23.1.18)
(November 14, 2017) Letter from Daryl Chong, President and Chief Executive Officer, Greater Toronto Apartment Association (LS.New.LS23.1.19)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73826.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) Letter from Janet Coles (LS.New.LS23.1.20)
(November 14, 2017) Submission from Ben Westelman, Director, Head of Legal eBay Classifieds Group Canada/NW Europe (LS.New.LS23.1.21)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73876.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Jerry Raso (LS.New.LS23.1.22)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Alvin Cheung (LS.New.LS23.1.23)
(November 15, 2017) E-mail from John Provart (LS.New.LS23.1.24)
(November 15, 2017) Letter from Dominique Russell, Chair, Friends of Kensington Market (LS.New.LS23.1.25)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73900.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) Submission from Monika Wagner and Norman Verrall (LS.New.LS23.1.26)
(November 16, 2017) Letter from Kenneth Hale, Director of Advocacy and Legal Services, Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario (LS.New.LS23.1.27)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73925.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) Submission from Thorben Wieditz, Fairbnb.ca Coalition (LS.New.LS23.1.28)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73926.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) Letter from Jim Murphy, President and Chief Executive Officer, Federation of Rental-Housing Providers of Ontario (LS.New.LS23.1.29)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73927.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) Letter from Nina Hall, Staff Lawyer, Kensington-Bellwoods Community Legal Services (LS.New.LS23.1.30)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73928.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) E-mail from Steven Tufts (LS.New.LS23.1.31)
(November 15, 2017) E-mail from Brian Tyndale (LS.New.LS23.1.32)
(November 15, 2017) E-mail from Christopher Brown, Principal, Avison Young (LS.New.LS23.1.33)
(November 15, 2017) Letter from Jacqueline Porter (LS.New.LS23.1.34)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Jeremy Dias, Executive Director, The Canadian Centre for Gender and Sexuality Diversity (LS.New.LS23.1.35)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73934.pdf)

(November 16, 2017) Submission from Fariba Anderson, Chief Executive Officer, AcuteNet Inc. (LS.New.LS23.1.36)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73936.pdf)

(November 16, 2017) Submission from Lisa Giansante (LS.New.LS23.1.37)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Emily Daigle (LS.New.LS23.1.38)
(November 16, 2017) Submission from Caitlin O'Neill, Public Policy Director, Sonder (LS.New.LS23.1.39)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73939.pdf)

(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Ed Van Gennip (LS.New.LS23.1.40)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Jennifer Boros (LS.New.LS23.1.41)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Michael Lewis (LS.New.LS23.1.42)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Rinat Shalom  (LS.New.LS23.1.43)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Kamyar Lolavar (LS.New.LS23.1.44)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Michael Pokrovsky (LS.New.LS23.1.45)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Magali Julien (LS.New.LS23.1.46)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Rigo Seucharan (LS.New.LS23.1.47)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Feliks Gagula and Ines Jarki (LS.New.LS23.1.48)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Chris Liao (LS.New.LS23.1.49)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Liviu Cojocaru (LS.New.LS23.1.50)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Ruth Donsky (LS.New.LS23.1.51)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Andrew Hutchings (LS.New.LS23.1.52)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Cher Knightingale (LS.New.LS23.1.53)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Michael Briggs (LS.New.LS23.1.54)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Kathleen Le Roux (LS.New.LS23.1.55)
(November 16, 2017) Submission from Linda Brett, Bloor Street East Neighbourhood Association (LS.New.LS23.1.56)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73907.pdf)

(November 16, 2017) Submission from Sue Robertson  (LS.New.LS23.1.57)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Papia Barua  (LS.New.LS23.1.58)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Ben d'Avernas (LS.New.LS23.1.59)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Adil and Mona Antia (LS.New.LS23.1.60)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Sylvester Nicholas (LS.New.LS23.1.61)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Tony Bassels  (LS.New.LS23.1.62)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Colin Gillies (LS.New.LS23.1.63)
(November 16, 2017) Submission from Richard de Sam Lazaro, Expedia Inc. (LS.New.LS23.1.64)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-73919.pdf)

(November 16, 2017) Submission from Catherine Lang (LS.New.LS23.1.65)
(November 16, 2017) Submission from Alex Dagg, Public Policy Manager, Canada, Airbnb (LS.New.LS23.1.66)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ls/comm/communicationfile-74011.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(November 22, 2017) Submission from Hasnain Hasan, Manager, Toronto Furnished Living (CC.Main.LS23.1.67)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74202.pdf)

(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Clarence Westhaver (CC.Main.LS23.1.68)
(November 17, 2017) E-mail from Judy Berger (CC.Main.LS23.1.69)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Janine Gliener (CC.Main.LS23.1.70)
(November 16, 2017) Submission from Catherine Lang (CC.Main.LS23.1.71)
(November 17, 2017) E-mail from Jane Anne Murry (CC.Main.LS23.1.72)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Maxine Louie (CC.Main.LS23.1.73)
(November 24, 2017) E-mail from Miranda Borisenko (CC.Main.LS23.1.74)
(November 28, 2017) E-mail from Nav Seyf (CC.Main.LS23.1.75)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Mitchell Posluns (CC.New.LS23.1.76)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Sara Weales (CC.New.LS23.1.77)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Andrée-Anne Forest-Voyer (CC.New.LS23.1.78)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Teresa Gough (CC.New.LS23.1.79)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Tai Moor (CC.New.LS23.1.80)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Krzysztof Maryan (CC.New.LS23.1.81)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Lorie McLaughlin (CC.New.LS23.1.82)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Jamal Virani (CC.New.LS23.1.83)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Christopher Thompson (CC.New.LS23.1.84)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from David Hogarth (CC.New.LS23.1.85)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Paulo Figueiras (CC.New.LS23.1.86)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Dawn Bazely (CC.New.LS23.1.87)
(November 17, 2017) E-mail from Ralph MacLeod (CC.New.LS23.1.88)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Lisa Cain (CC.New.LS23.1.89)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Shane Zuchowski (CC.New.LS23.1.90)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Emily Mantin (CC.New.LS23.1.91)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Claude Babin (CC.New.LS23.1.92)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Alyas Ali (CC.New.LS23.1.93)
(December 1, 2017) E-mail from Valerie Lannon (CC.New.LS23.1.94)
(December 4, 2017) Letter from Geoff Kettel and Cathie Macdonald, Co-Chairs, Federation of North Toronto Residents' Associations (CC.New.LS23.1.95)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74333.pdf)

(December 3, 2017) E-mail from Diane Devenyi (CC.New.LS23.1.96)
(December 4, 2017) Letter from Daryl Chong, President and Chief Executive Officer, Greater Toronto Apartment Association (CC.New.LS23.1.97)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74294.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Matt Caissie (CC.New.LS23.1.98)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Darnell Moses (CC.New.LS23.1.99)
(December 4, 2017) E-mail from Peter Moore (CC.New.LS23.1.100)
(December 4, 2017) E-mail from Doug Ewart (CC.New.LS23.1.101)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Liviu Cojocaru (CC.New.LS23.1.102)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Pulickel and Poornima Ajayan (CC.New.LS23.1.103)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Carrie Gervais (CC.New.LS23.1.104)
(December 5, 2017) Letter from Eileen Denny, President, Teddington Park Residents Association Inc.  (CC.New.LS23.1.105)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74398.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) E-mail from David Lidov (CC.New.LS23.1.106)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Joanne Hansen (CC.New.LS23.1.107)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Indra Morrison (CC.New.LS23.1.108)
(November 16, 2017) Letter from Jennifer Graham (CC.New.LS23.1.109)
(December 5, 2017) Letter from Linda McCarthy, Vice-President, Lytton Park Residents' Organization Inc.  (CC.New.LS23.1.110)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74403.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Jeff Timmons  (CC.New.LS23.1.111)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Sean Beckett (CC.New.LS23.1.112)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Brenda Lowes (CC.New.LS23.1.113)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Rahim Lalani (CC.New.LS23.1.114)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Carlos Lopes (CC.New.LS23.1.115)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Shannon Villeneuve-Shulman (CC.New.LS23.1.116)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Papia Barua (CC.New.LS23.1.117)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from AJ Huang (CC.New.LS23.1.118)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Mumtaz and Amin Virani (CC.New.LS23.1.119)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Janis Targum (CC.New.LS23.1.120)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Fotini Iconomopoulos (CC.New.LS23.1.121)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Suzanne Anderson (CC.New.LS23.1.122)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Devesh Modi (CC.New.LS23.1.123)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Ines Pacheco (CC.New.LS23.1.124)
(December 6, 2017) Letter from Feliks and Ines Jarki (CC.New.LS23.1.125)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Des Narciso (CC.New.LS23.1.126)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Marian Mattison (CC.New.LS23.1.127)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Karen Teune (CC.New.LS23.1.128)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Catherine Van Dyke (CC.New.LS23.1.129)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Hanna Gry (CC.New.LS23.1.130)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Peter Neumann and Louise Gwyn (CC.New.LS23.1.131)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Sharon Tiessen (CC.New.LS23.1.132)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Donna and Tom Hunt (CC.New.LS23.1.133)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Alex Cruz  (CC.New.LS23.1.134)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Dylan Juckes (CC.New.LS23.1.135)
(December 7, 2017) Letter from Sharry Aiken and Miriam Kramer (CC.New.LS23.1.136)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Ariel Benibgui (CC.New.LS23.1.137)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Nikesha Trumpet (CC.New.LS23.1.138)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Shannon Hancocks (CC.New.LS23.1.139)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Christina Moro (CC.New.LS23.1.140)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Sean McKay (CC.New.LS23.1.141)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Brenda Dalglish (CC.New.LS23.1.142)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Simon and Catherine (CC.New.LS23.1.143)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Michael Krimus (CC.New.LS23.1.144)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Dwyke Young (CC.New.LS23.1.145)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Kathleen Le Roux (CC.New.LS23.1.146)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Tonia Vuolo (CC.New.LS23.1.147)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Michelle Webb (CC.New.LS23.1.148)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Abigail Pugh (CC.New.LS23.1.149)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Ainsley (CC.New.LS23.1.150)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Jason Schwartz (CC.New.LS23.1.151)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Ananda More (CC.New.LS23.1.152)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Rouzbeh (CC.New.LS23.1.153)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Adrian Golombek (CC.New.LS23.1.154)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Papia Barua (CC.New.LS23.1.155)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Frank Yin (CC.New.LS23.1.156)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Julian Solis (CC.New.LS23.1.157)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Sue Robertson (CC.New.LS23.1.158)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Liane Ninja (CC.New.LS23.1.159)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Mandie Freire (CC.New.LS23.1.160)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from George Filtsos (CC.New.LS23.1.161)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Alexis Leino (CC.New.LS23.1.162)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Vic S (CC.New.LS23.1.163)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Philippe Gauthier (CC.New.LS23.1.164)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Valeri Oparychev (CC.New.LS23.1.165)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Sylvester Nicholas (CC.New.LS23.1.166)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Cathy Liu (CC.New.LS23.1.167)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Esther Epp (CC.New.LS23.1.168)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Priscilla Lee (CC.New.LS23.1.169)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Nikola Curcin (CC.New.LS23.1.170)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Samaria Mazan (CC.New.LS23.1.171)
(December 7, 2017) Multiple Communications from 780 individuals. List of communications LS23.1.172 to LS23.1.952 (CC.New.LS23.1.)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74383.pdf)


Parks and Environment Committee - Meeting 23
PE23.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:22, 27 

Yellow Creek/Vale of Avoca - Update
Communication PE23.3.12 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Parks and Environment Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council request the General Manager, Toronto Water, to expand the Yellow Creek Geomorphic Systems Master Plan Environmental Assessment to include assets beyond geomorphic systems and erosion-impacted infrastructure, as well as a long-term maintenance plan. This must include, at a minimum, an inventory and state of good repair of all existing facilities, including the trail network, an analysis of ecological integrity, and identification of the departments or agencies responsible for implementing and maintaining all planned improvements.

 

2.  City Council request the General Manager, Toronto Water, develop the Yellow Creek Geomorphic Systems Master Plan Environmental Assessment in consultation with a working group comprised of relevant community stakeholders and that this working group be formed at the earliest opportunity to inform the Environmental Assessment process for its full duration.


3.  City Council request the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, use the Yellow Creek Geomorphic Systems Master Plan Environmental Assessment as a template for future ravine studies and as a costing model for what is required to bring Toronto's entire ravine system into a good state of ecological repair.

Origin
(October 30, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation
Summary

The purpose of this report is to respond to the request from the September 9, 2016 Parks and Environment Committee on the feasibility and process to develop a Master Plan for the Yellow Creek and Vale of Avoca area. The Vale of Avoca are the ravine lands surrounding Yellow Creek in Ward 22, St. Paul's and Ward 27, Toronto Centre-Rosedale. It is a highly valued parkland space that includes vital infrastructure such as trails, stairs, bridges, sewers and other public facilities normally found in Toronto ravines.

 

The Ravine Strategy, approved by City Council on October 2, 2017, will guide the management of Toronto's ravine system. Through the application of the Ravine Strategy Prioritization Framework, the City will be able to prioritize areas where protecting ecosystems while managing recreation use and improving access is needed and to start to identify opportunities for collaboration with internal and external partners.

 

As part of their Council Approved 2017-2026 Capital Budget and Plan, Toronto Water will initiate a Geomorphic Systems Master Plan Environmental Assessment for Yellow Creek. This study will recommend a long-term plan to address erosion and protection of existing critical culvert, sewer, and watermain infrastructure.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 30, 2017) Report from the General Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation on Yellow Creek/Vale of Avoca - Update
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-108752.pdf)

Speakers

Robert Spindler, Moore Park Residents Association
Chris Lowry, President, Moore Park Residents Association
Joan York, Board Member, Deer Park Residents Group
Catherine Berka, Toronto Ravine Revitalization Study, University of Toronto, Faculty of Forestry
Eric Davies, Toronto Ravine Revitalization Study, University of Toronto, Faculty of Forestry
John Bossons, Board Member, Summerhill Resident's Association
Councillor Janet Davis
Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam

Communications (Committee)
(November 12, 2017) E-mail from Milena Kras-Claydon (PE.New.PE23.3.1)
(November 12, 2017) E-mail from Trevor Currie (PE.New.PE23.3.2)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Tania Sulan and David Bentley (PE.New.PE23.3.3)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Monika Geisweiller (PE.New.PE23.3.4)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Gillian Bogden (PE.New.PE23.3.5)
(November 15, 2017) Submission from John Bossons, Board Member, Summerhill Resident's Association and Coalition of Yellow Creek Residents' Associations (PE.New.PE23.3.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pe/comm/communicationfile-73952.pdf)

(November 16, 2017) Letter from Joan York, Board Member, Deer Park Residents Group (PE.New.PE23.3.7)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Shane Crompton (PE.New.PE23.3.8)
(November 17, 2017) Submission from Catherine Berka, Toronto Ravine Revitalization Study, University of Toronto, Faculty of Forestry (PE.New.PE23.3.9)
(November 17, 2017) E-mail from Susan Stock (PE.New.PE23.3.10)
(November 16, 2017) Letter from Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, Ward 27, Toronto Centre-Rosedale, and Councillor Josh Matlow, Ward 22, St. Paul's (PE.New.PE23.3.11)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pe/comm/communicationfile-73967.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(December 5, 2017) Submission from Lenka Holubec (CC.New.PE23.3.12)
Declared Interests (Committee)

The following member(s) declared an interest:

Councillor Mike Layton - as his mother owns property adjacent to the Vale of Avoca area.


PE23.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Energy Storage Partnership Agreements
Committee Recommendations

The Parks and Environment Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council approve the demonstration Hybrid PV Energy Storage projects term sheet as in Attachment 1 of the report (November 1, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, and authorize the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services to negotiate, enter into, and execute the demonstration Hybrid PV Energy Storage partnership agreement on behalf of the City with Toronto Hydro Electric System Limited with terms and conditions satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

 

2.  City Council authorize the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services to negotiate, enter into, and execute future energy storage partnership agreements on behalf of the City, with terms and conditions satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

Origin
(November 1, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services
Summary

The purpose of this report is to seek Council approval for negotiating and entering into partnership agreements for the installation of Hybrid PV Energy Storage systems at City facilities.

 

The Environment and Energy Division is collaborating with Facilities Management and Toronto Paramedics Services to develop two demonstration projects.

 

This innovative partnership supports the City's TransformTO strategy to "Lead by Example" to accelerate the investment in low-carbon technologies in City facilities to improve operations. The projects are also expected to generate utility savings as well as avoiding maintenance costs and capital replacement expenditures associated with owning conventional generator equipment.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 1, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, on Energy Storage Partnership Agreements
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-108629.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Term Sheet - Demonstration Hybrid PV Energy Storage Projects
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-108822.pdf)


PE23.7

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Reducing Health Risks from Traffic-Related Air Pollution (TRAP) in Toronto
To be considered with Item HL22.3

Communication PE23.7.3 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Parks and Environment Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct the Director, Environment and Energy, in collaboration with the Medical Officer of Health, to:

 

a.  Work with staff from City Planning; Toronto Building; Children's Services; Long-Term Care Homes and Services; Facilities Management; Transportation Services; Engineering and Construction Services; Parks, Forestry and Recreation; the Toronto Public Library; and other appropriate City divisions and agencies, to develop feasible best practices on how to reduce exposure to traffic-related air pollution, and facilitate their implementation at City facilities;

 

b.  Develop guidance to assist appropriate City agencies, corporations, and divisions in establishing traffic-related air pollution mitigation measures at City-owned sites located within 500 metres of roads with annual average traffic volumes of 100,000 vehicles or more per day, and within 100 metres of roads with annual average traffic volumes of 15,000 vehicles or more per day; and

 

c.  Develop best practices guidelines for new and existing buildings, in consultation with industry professionals, and raise awareness of these practices among school board staff, child care centre operators, long-term care facility operators, and residents, as well as builders, developers, designers, architects, engineers, and other professionals.

 

2.  City Council direct the General Manager, Transportation Services, in collaboration with the Director, Environment and Energy, to:

 

a.  Pursue, through the Toronto Congestion Management Plan (2016-2020), opportunities to reduce traffic-related air pollution;

 

b.  Undertake an evaluation of the City's street sweeping service levels to identify any possible enhancements that could improve air quality along Toronto's roadways by:

 

1.  Adopting Ontario's interim 24-hour Ambient Air Quality Criterion (AAQC) for coarse particulate matter (PM10) of 50 micrograms per cubic metre of air (50 µg/m3) and the 24-hour Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard (CAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) of 28 micrograms per cubic metre of air (28 µg/m3) as air quality benchmarks for the maximum desirable concentration of particulate matter in air along Toronto streets;

 

2.  Conducting an air quality monitoring study of ambient PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations along City streets to assess the impact of current street sweeping practices, and using the findings to inform street sweeping service levels;

 

3.  Developing an air quality monitoring program for ambient PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations to assess whether the interim 24-hour Ambient Air Quality Criterion for PM10 and the 24-hour Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM2.5 are met near roadways; and

 

4.  Giving first priority to meeting the air quality benchmarks at sensitive use properties, including child care centres, schools, and long-term care homes, within 500 metres of roads with annual average traffic volumes of 100,000 vehicles or more per day, and giving second priority to sensitive uses within 100 metres of roads with annual average traffic volumes of 15,000 vehicles or more per day, and identify a strategy for meeting the air quality benchmarks more broadly across the City giving priority to areas with elevated particulate matter concentrations and residential areas.

 

3.  City Council request the Ontario Minister of Environment and Climate Change to:

 

a.  Undertake mobile air quality monitoring and air modelling along provincial highways including those located in Toronto to assess the relationship between traffic counts and air quality in areas adjacent to these highways, to estimate health risks, and provide trends over time;

 

b.  Estimate the cost of social, environmental, and health impacts associated with TRAP, including health-care costs and years of life lost, and compare these with the costs of preventing emissions of, and exposure to, TRAP; and

 

c.  Establish a special air management area focussed on land adjacent to Provincial highways in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area to facilitate development and implementation of provincial and municipal measures to reduce releases of, and exposure to, traffic-related air pollution along these highways.

 

4.  City Council request the Ontario Minister of Finance to implement financing and funding mechanisms for building retrofits needed to reduce exposure to traffic-related air pollution, with a priority placed on supporting retrofits of buildings with sensitive uses (such as schools, child care centres and long-term care facilities) located near highways and roads with average daily traffic volumes of 100,000 vehicles or more.

 

5.  City Council request the Ontario Minister of Transportation to review the feasibility of modifying street sweeping standards and practices on Provincial Highways to reduce levels of PM10 (particulate matter with an average diameter of 10 micrometres of less) in air along such highways.

 

6.  City Council request the Federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change to:

 

a.  Harmonize Canadian environmental emissions standards for fuels, vehicles and engines with those applicable in the State of California;

 

b.  Identify a strategy to reduce emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases from older model heavy-duty diesel trucks; and

 

c.  Include in Canada's Clean Fuel Standard, limits to emissions of air pollutants, in addition to the proposed limits on greenhouse gases.

 

7.  City Council forward the report (October 16, 2017) from the Medical Officer of Health and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services, to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Public Health Ontario (PHO), Central Local Health Integration Network (LHIN), Central East LHIN, Central West LHIN, Mississauga Halton LHIN, Toronto Central LHIN, the Toronto District School Board (TDSB), the Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB), le Conseil Scolaire Viamonde, le Conseil Scolaire Catholique MonAvenir, the Ontario Long Term Care Association (OLTCA), AdvantAge Ontario, the Home Child Care Association of Ontario, the Association of Day Care Operators of Ontario (ADCO), the Ontario Landlords Association, Toronto Landlords, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the Ontario Association of Architects (OAA), the Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD), the Ontario Home Builders’ Association, the Greater Toronto Area Clean Air Council (GTA-CAC), and the Pembina Institute.

Origin
(October 16, 2017) Report from the Medical Officer of Health and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services
Summary

Toronto's air quality is improving. Policies and programs implemented by federal, provincial and municipal governments have led to decreases in pollutant emissions, ambient air pollution levels, and related health impacts. However, Toronto Public Health estimates that air pollution still contributes to 1,300 premature deaths and 3,550 hospitalizations in Toronto each year.

 

Motor vehicle traffic is the largest source of air pollution emitted in Toronto. Exposures to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) are highest near highways and busy roads. The health literature indicates that health risk from TRAP is higher within 500 metres of highways with an average daily traffic volume of 100,000 vehicles or more, and within 100 metres of arterial roads with an average daily traffic volume of 15,000 vehicles or more. Studies show that people living close to roads are more likely to experience adverse health outcomes including breathing problems, heart disease, cancer, and premature death. People who are more vulnerable to these impacts include children, the elderly, and people with certain pre-existing medical conditions.

 

Emissions of TRAP in Toronto can be reduced with sustained focus on initiatives that promote active transportation and transit, reduce congestion, and encourage use of electric vehicles. Recent updates to the Official Plan, the Walking Strategy, the Toronto Complete Streets Guidelines, the 10-year Cycling Network Plan, and TransformTO, Toronto's renewed climate action plan, are among the City initiatives that will reduce exposure to TRAP.

 

There are additional opportunities to reduce health risks from TRAP. Operational changes in buildings and a combination of strategies including site planning, building design, and physical barriers can be used during construction or when retrofitting older buildings. Bringing these best practices to the attention of those who design and manage buildings, particularly buildings occupied by vulnerable populations such as schools, child care centres and long-term care facilities, can encourage their adoption. Funding and other financing mechanisms can encourage building retrofits to mitigate exposure to TRAP, especially for vulnerable populations.

 

A special provincial air quality management approach for large urban areas can help provide a framework for focused interventions. Regular air quality monitoring along busy highways, and an assessment of the costs associated with TRAP, can help better define the challenge and assess the effectiveness of interventions. Strengthening partnerships with organizations around the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area and across Canada who are addressing TRAP will help identify and implement best practices and contribute to reducing exposure to TRAP in Toronto.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 16, 2017) Report from the Medical Officer of Health and the Deputy City Manager, Internal Corporate Services on Reducing Health Risks from Traffic-Related Air Pollution (TRAP) in Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-108665.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Map of Expected Zones of TRAP Exposure in the City of Toronto
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-108666.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Avoiding the TRAP: Traffic-Related Air Pollution in Toronto and Options for Reducing Exposure
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pe/bgrd/backgroundfile-108667.pdf)

Communications (Committee)
(November 17, 2017) Letter from Bryan Purcell, Director of Policy and Programs, The Atmospheric Fund (PE.New.PE23.7.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pe/comm/communicationfile-73961.pdf)

(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Sharon Yetman, Chief Executive Officer, Platform Technology Consultancy (PE.New.PE23.7.2)
Communications (City Council)
(November 30, 2017) Letter from Linda McCarthy, Secretary, Pulmonary Rehabilitation Clinic, Toronto Western Hospital (CC.Supp.PE23.7.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74303.pdf)


Planning and Growth Management Committee - Meeting 24
PG24.1

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:30 

Unilever Precinct Planning Study and East Harbour Application Review - Update
Committee Recommendations

The Planning and Growth Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council receive the report (October 24, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning for information.

Origin
(October 24, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning
Summary

This report provides a series of updates on the Unilever Precinct Planning Study, including the review of First Gulf's East Harbour development applications and the East Harbour SmartTrack Station planning context.  It provides information on consultation events for these projects and sets out the anticipated consultation plan moving forward. 

 

This report also includes a description of First Gulf's Master Plan Update submission.  This submission revises the prior master plan proposal from December 2016.  It includes additional properties acquired at 375 and 385 Eastern Avenue (adjacent to the Metrolinx rail embankment), and also contemplates additional density on First Gulf's lands.  First Gulf is now proposing 925,314 m2 (approximately 10 million ft2) of employment development on the 15.15 hectare (37 acre) portion of the Unilever Precinct they own, compared to 829,833m2

(approximately 9 million ft2) on the 13.8 hectares (34 acres) they owned at the time of the December 2016 rezoning and subdivision submissions.

 

In addition, this report addresses the request of Planning and Growth Management Committee from February 23, 2017, that the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, report back on consultation with Enbridge Gas Distribution respecting First Gulf's applications and the Unilever Precinct Plan.  It also provides updates on Real Estate Services' work regarding yard consolidation and on coordination of major enabling infrastructure projects in the Lower Don River, including the newly commenced Broadview and Eastern Flood Protection Municipal Class Environmental Assessment.

 

This report is submitted for information at this time to provide updated details to the Committee on First Gulf's current proposal; to advise as to ongoing consultation activities on the Precinct Planning Study, the SmartTrack station and First Gulf's resubmitted proposal; and to address matters the Committee requested information on in February 2017.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 24, 2017) Report and Attachments 1, 2 and 3 from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on Unilever Precinct Planning Study and East Harbour Application Review - Update
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108542.pdf)

Speakers

Jonathan Ahee, Co-Chair, Toronto Film, Television and Digital Media Board
David Gerofsky, Chief Executive Officer, First Gulf
Councillor Paula Fletcher

Communications (Committee)
(November 14, 2017) Letter from David Gerofsky, Chief Executive Officer, First Gulf Corporation (PG.New.PG24.1.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73875.pdf)


PG24.2

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Second Update on City of Toronto Archaeological Collections Repository
Committee Recommendations

The Planning and Growth Management Committee recommends that:

 

1. City Council adopt the principle that Toronto archaeological collections, except those noted in recommendation 2 of the report (October 17, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning and the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture, be deposited in the repository managed by Sustainable Archaeology at McMaster University in Hamilton.

 

2. City Council direct that Archaeological collections related to the museums and other heritage properties managed by the Economic Development and Culture Division be deposited in the City's museum collections centre.

 

3. City Council request the Province of Ontario to provide direction and funding to support the transfer of Toronto-based archaeological collections to Sustainable Archaeology.

Origin
(October 17, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning and the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture
Summary

This report presents a second update on work completed by staff respecting a City of Toronto archaeological collections repository. Two options were explored for managing collections held by consulting archaeologists. The first entails creating a stand-alone City-operated repository that would take all Toronto-based collections, at substantial cost to the City. The second option, which is recommended by staff, entails having most Toronto-based collections go to an existing repository in Hamilton managed by Sustainable Archaeology, at no cost to the City. Only those collections from the museums and other heritage properties managed by the Economic Development and Culture Division would be deposited in the City's existing museum collections centre, at minimal cost to the City.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 17, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning and the General Manager, Economic Development and Culture on Second Update on City of Toronto Archaeological Collections Repository
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108270.pdf)


PG24.3

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:20, 27, 28 

Airport Zoning Regulation to Protect Hospital Helicopter Flight Paths- Final Report
Communication PG24.3.2 has been submitted on this Item.

Bill 1430 has been submitted on this Item.
Public Notice Given
Statutory - Aeronautics Act, RSC 1985, c. A-2
Committee Recommendations

The Planning and Growth Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.   City Council adopt an airport zoning regulation for the hospital helicopter flight paths for the Hospital for Sick Children and the St. Michael’s Hospital substantially in accordance with the draft Airport Zoning Regulation attached as Attachment 4 to the report (October 18, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning.

 

2.   City Council authorize the City Solicitor to make such stylistic and technical changes to the draft Airport Zoning Regulation as may be required.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Planning and Growth Management Committee held a public meeting on November 15, 2017, and notice was given in accordance with the Aeronautics Act.

Origin
(October 18, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning
Summary

The St. Michael’s Hospital and the Hospital for Sick Children, (Sick Kids) each have helipads that provide vital critical and trauma care service to the entire City of Toronto and surrounding areas.  The protection of the flight paths for these helipads from intrusions caused by development is necessary to ensure their continued and effective operation. Aeronautics falls within the federal government's jurisdiction.  Transport Canada delegated the power to the City of Toronto to regulate the use of lands in the vicinity of hospital helipads on August 21, 2017, pursuant to City Council approval on July 12-15, 2016 (EX16.25).

 

This report reviews and recommends the adoption of an airport zoning regulation to protect the hospitals’ helicopter flight paths.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 18, 2017) Revised Report and Attachments 1 to 4 from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on Airport Zoning Regulation to Protect Hospital Helicopter Flight Paths- Final Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-109083.pdf)

(October 18, 2017) Report and Attachments 1 to 4 from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on Airport Zoning Regulation to Protect Hospital Helicopter Flight Paths- Final Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108477.pdf)

(October 25, 2017) Notice of Public Meeting to be held by the Planning and Growth Management Committee (Under the Aeronautics Act)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108630.pdf)

Speakers

Dr. Robert Howard, President and Chief Executive Officer, St. Michael’s Hospital
Dr. Michael Apkon, President and CEO, Sick Kids Hospital
Kate Lyons, Goodmans LLP
Michael Binetti, Affleck Green McMurtry LLP

Communications (Committee)
(November 14, 2017) Letter from Michael Binetti, Affleck Green McMurtry LLP, representing Lalu Canada Inc. (PG.New.PG24.3.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73873.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(December 4, 2017) Letter from Michael I. Binetti, Affleck Greene McMurtry LLP (CC.New.PG24.3.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74386.pdf)


PG24.4

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:6 

39 Newcastle Street - Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment Application
Communication PG24.4.8 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Planning and Growth Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council direct the City Solicitor and other appropriate City staff to attend the Ontario Municipal Board hearing to oppose the appeal of the Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment application at 39 Newcastle Street (under File No. 16 198950 WET 06 OZ), in its current form, for the following reasons:

 

a.  The proposal is inconsistent with the Provincial Policy Statement;

 

b.   The proposal conflicts with the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe;

 

c.    The proposal does not conform with the City of Toronto Official Plan, including policies related to but not limited to Built Form, Public Realm, Economic Revitalization and Land Use and Regeneration Areas which state that a development framework for the area will be developed and that development should not proceed prior to approval of a Secondary Plan; and

 

d.  The proposal does not conform with the Mimico-Judson Secondary Plan  (OPA No. 331), adopted by City Council on June 7, 2016 and currently under appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board, and is not consistent with the Mimico-Judson Urban Design Guidelines.  In particular, the  application, in its current form, does not conform with the following matters:

 

i.  The Secondary Plan envisions two tall buildings on the subject lands with heights of up to 30-storeys (with a street wall height of 4-storeys), whereas the application proposes three tall towers (with  a street wall height of 4-storeys) having heights of 22, 30 and 36-storeys.

 

ii.  The Secondary Plan envisions the Mimico-Judson Greenway (multi-use pedestrian and cycling trail) to be located along the south limits of the subject site, whereas the Greenway is proposed along the south side of Newcastle Street and east side of Windsor Street.

 

iii.   The Secondary Plan requires a centralized public park to be located within Block D that would not be in shadow for seven continuous hours during the spring and summer equinoxes, whereas the current proposal shadows Block D and only allows for five continuous hours of sunlight on the future parkland during the  spring and summer equinoxes.

 

iv.  The Secondary Plan requires a minimum of 0.5 Floor Space Index of non-residential gross floor area for tall buildings, whereas 0.3 Floor Space Index of non-residential gross floor area is proposed.

 

v.  The Secondary Plan requires that any portion of a development containing residential and other nsitive land uses shall be setback a minimum of 30 m from the property line bordering the rail corridor to the south, whereas a setback of 22 m is being proposed.

 

2.   City Council authorize City staff to continue discussions with the applicant to negotiate an appropriate development proposal that is in keeping with the Mimico-Judson Secondary Plan and Urban Design Guidelines.

Origin
(October 23, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning
Summary

This application proposes to amend the Official Plan and Zoning By-laws (under File No. 16 198950 WET 06 OZ) to permit a mixed use development proposal with three residential apartment buildings (22, 30 and 36-storeys) connected by a 4-storey podium having a total of 74,374 m2 of gross floor area, of which 2,578 m2 would be for non-residential (retail) uses.  The development would contain approximately 833 residential units and a total of 589 vehicular parking spaces within a parking garage having two-levels underground and three-levels above ground.  The original proposal included two residential apartment buildings (28 and 30-storeys) and a total of 606 residential units.

 

This report reviews and recommends refusal of the application to amend the Official Plan and Zoning By-laws for 39 Newcastle Street (see Attachment 1: Key Map).

 

The proposed development, in its current form, does not conform with the Official Plan policies and the recently approved and appealed Mimico-Judson Secondary Plan and is not consistent with the Mimico-Judson Urban Design Guidelines.  The subject lands are designated Regeneration Areas.  The Official Plan states that each Regeneration Areas requires a tailor-made planning framework and that development should not proceed prior to the approval of a Secondary Plan.  As the Mimico-Judson Secondary Plan is currently under appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board, the application is premature.  In addition, the proposal represents over development of the site with density, massing and building heights that do not fit within their existing or planned context or limit their impacts on neighbouring properties.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 23, 2017) Report and Attachments 1 to 11 from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on 39 Newcastle Street - Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment Application - Refusal Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108342.pdf)

(October 26, 2017) Notice that Refusal Report will be considered by the Planning and Growth Management Committee
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108555.pdf)

Speakers

Martin Gerwin, Co-Chair, Steering Committee, Mimico Lakeshore Community Network
Harry Oussoren , Mimico Lakeshore Community Network
Judith Rutledge, Co-Chair, Steering Committee, Mimico Lakeshore Community Network

Communications (Committee)
(November 6, 2017) E-mail from Jan Vanderwal (PG.Main.PG24.4.1)
(November 8, 2017) E-mail from Carolyn Murphy (PG.New.PG24.4.2)
(November 11, 2017) Letter from Chris Moore, President, Mimico Residents Association (PG.New.PG24.4.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73683.pdf)

(November 13, 2017) Letter from Martin Gerwin and Judith Rutledge, Co-chairs, Mimico Lakeshore Community Network Steering Committee (PG.New.PG24.4.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73766.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) Letter from Timothy Dobson, Chairman, Landscape Architect and Arborist, Lakeshore Planning Council Corporation (PG.New.PG24.4.5)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73852.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) Letter from Werner Schwarz, Co-Chair and Bryan Pett, Co-Chairs Mystic Pointe and Area Residents Association (PG.New.PG24.4.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73855.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) Letter from Councillor Mark Grimes (PG.New.PG24.4.7)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73834.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(December 1, 2017) Letter from Martin E. Gerwin and Judith A. Rutledge, Co-Chairs, Mimico Lakeshore Community Network Steering Committee (CC.Supp.PG24.4.8)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74307.pdf)


4a 39 Newcastle Street - Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment Application - Supplementary Report
Origin
(November 6, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning
Summary

A Refusal Report, dated October 23, 2017, on the Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment application for 39 Newcastle Street has been prepared for consideration by Planning and Growth Management Committee at its meeting on November 15, 2017.  On October 30, 2017, McMillan LLP (on behalf of CIC Management Services Inc.) filed an appeal (for the current proposal) to the Ontario Municipal Board citing Council's failure to make a decision within the time period prescribed under the Planning Act.

 

This report recommends that Recommendation No.1 contained in the October 23, 2017 Refusal Report be modified to reflect the appropriate action required for this appeal and seeks City Council's direction for the City Solicitor and other appropriate City staff to attend the Ontario Municipal Board hearing to oppose the application.  No modifications are required to Recommendation No. 2 in the Refusal Report.

 

The application proposes to amend the Official Plan and Zoning By-laws (under File No. 16 198950 WET 06 OZ) to permit a mixed use development comprised of three residential apartment towers (22, 30 and 36-storeys) connected by a 4-storey podium having a total of 74,374 m2 of gross floor area, of which 2,578 m2 would be for non-residential (retail) uses.  The development would contain approximately 833 residential units and a total of 589 vehicular parking spaces within a parking garage having two-levels underground and three-levels above ground. 

 

The applicant's original proposal (submitted on July 29, 2016) included two residential apartment towers (28 and 30-storeys) and a total of 606 residential units and 983 vehicular parking spaces.

Background Information (Committee)
(November 6, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning Division on 39 Newcastle Street - Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment Application - Supplementary
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108845.pdf)


PG24.5

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Technical Amendments to Zoning By-law 569-2013
Communication PG24.5.1 has been submitted on this Item.

Bills 1427 and 1428 have been submitted on this Item.
Public Notice Given
Statutory - Planning Act, RSO 1990
Committee Recommendations

The Planning and Growth Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.   City Council enact zoning by-law amendments substantially in accordance with Attachments 1 and 2 to the report (October 19, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning.

 

2.   City Council authorize the City Solicitor to make such stylistic and technical changes to each zoning by-law amendment as may be required.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Planning and Growth Management Committee held a statutory public meeting on November 15, 2017, and notice was given in accordance with the Planning Act.

Origin
(October 19, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning
Summary

This report proposes technical by-law amendments to Zoning By-law 569-2013 to correct minor typographical errors, zoning labels and mapped zoning boundaries adjustments. The amendments also corrects errors in previously Council enacted Zoning By-law amendment 820-2015, which inadvertently altered the development rights of 35 other properties.

              

This proposed by-law amendment also addresses changes to the Day Nurseries Act which is now called the Child Care and Early Years Act, and brings Zoning By-law 569-2013 into compliance with that Provincial Act.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 19, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on Technical Amendments to Zoning By-law 569-2013
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108468.pdf)

Attachment 1: Draft Technical By-law Amendments to Zoning By-law 569-2013 and Attachment 2: Draft Technical By-law Amendments to Zoning By-law 820-2015
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108469.pdf)

(October 24, 2017) Notice of Public Meeting to be held by the Planning and Growth Management Committee (under the Planning Act)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108534.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(December 4, 2017) Letter from Eileen Denny, President, Teddington Park Residents Association Inc. (CC.New.PG24.5.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74375.pdf)


PG24.6

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:30 

Port Lands Planning Initiatives - Final Report
Communications PG24.6.15 to PG24.6.21 have been submitted on this Item.

First Item on Friday, December 8th
Public Notice Given
Statutory - Planning Act, RSO 1990
Committee Recommendations

The Planning and Growth Management Committee recommends that:

 

1. City Council adopt the Port Lands Planning Framework (September 2017), prepared by the City Planning Division with Waterfront Toronto, attached as Attachment 1 to the report (September 27, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, to guide the revitalization of the Port Lands.

 
2. City Council endorse the Villiers Island Precinct Plan (September 2017), prepared by Urban Strategies Inc. on behalf of Waterfront Toronto, attached as Attachment 2 to the report the report (September 27, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, to guide rezonings within the Precinct.

 
3. City Council instruct the City Solicitor to request the Ontario Municipal Board:

 
a. Repeal Official Plan Amendment 388 enacted by City Council on August 27, 2010 as an amendment to the former City of Toronto Official Plan and Central Waterfront Secondary Plan for the Lower Don Lands;


b. Modify the former City of Toronto Official Plan and Central Waterfront Secondary Plan, substantially in accordance with the draft Official Plan modification attached as Attachment 3; and


c. Take the necessary actions to implement the draft Official Plan modification at the on-going Ontario Municipal Board hearing on the Central Waterfront Secondary Plan as appropriate.

 
4. City Council amend the City’s Official Plan in accordance with the draft Official Plan Amendment in Attachment 4 to the report (September 27, 2017) from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B, for major public streets, transit priority segments and right-of-way widenings in the South of Eastern Area.

 
5. City Council authorize the City Solicitor to make such stylistic and technical changes to the draft Port Lands Official Plan modification and South of Eastern Transportation Official Plan Amendment as may be required.

 
6. City Council classify the Villiers Island, Polson Quay, South River and McCleary Districts as Class 4 areas under the Ministry of Environment (now Ministry of Environment and Climate Change) Environmental Noise Guideline, Stationary and Transportation Sources – Approval and Planning, Publication NPC-300, August 2013.

 
7. City Council request that the Deputy City Manager for Cluster B with Waterfront Toronto and relevant Divisions, Agencies and Corporations to:

 
a. Initiate a zoning review for the Port and Industrial Districts;


b. Prepare a Precinct Plan for the McCleary District and develop urban design guidelines for Productions, Interactive and Creative districts;


c. Develop a Port Lands-wide truck management strategy;


d. Undertake a feasibility study to determine the optimal approach for low-carbon energy solutions in the Port Lands; and


e. Prepare a Class B cost estimate (­plus or minus 20 per cent) for relocating and undergrounding hydro infrastructure in the Port Lands.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Planning and Growth Management Committee commenced a statutory public meeting on October 12, 2017 and continued the public meeting on November 15, 2017, and notice was given in accordance with the Planning Act.

Origin
(September 27, 2017) Report from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B
Summary

The Port Lands is one of the most significant urban renewal opportunities in Toronto, but also a remarkable place today. Its concentration of heritage resources, natural areas, active port and industrial uses assist in building and maintaining the broader city. It also has numerous film studios and related uses that support Toronto’s film sector. An updated framework to guide and shape urban renewal is vital to ensuring all development advanced in the near, medium and longer-terms will have lasting value and support long-term city building objectives. The completion of the Port Lands Planning Framework and Villiers Island Precinct Plan represents the culmination of over four years of collaborative work by the City and Waterfront Toronto, with support from the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and numerous City divisions and agencies, all shaped by a robust consultation program.

 

The May 16, 2017 Port Lands Planning Initiatives – Interim Report summarized the findings of the Port Lands Planning Framework and the Port Lands and South of Eastern Transportation and Servicing Master Plan (TSMP). This report builds on the May 2017 report and addresses the direction provided by City Council. This report seeks Council’s:

 

Adoption of the Port Lands Planning Framework (Attachment 1) to guide the revitalization of the Port Lands over the coming decades;


Endorsement of the Villiers Island Precinct Plan (Attachment 2) to provide additional guidance for Zoning By-law amendments and Plans of Subdivision;


Instruction for the City Solicitor to request the Ontario Municipal Board to modify the Central Waterfront Secondary Plan (CWSP) for the Port Lands at the on-going hearing in accordance with the recommended Official Plan modification (Attachment 3);


Classification of Villiers Island, the McCleary District, Polson Quay and South River districts as Class 4 areas under the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change’s Environmental Noise Guideline;


Adoption of the South of Eastern Transportation Official Plan Amendment (Attachment 4) for public streets, transit priority and right-of-way widenings in the South of Eastern area to reflect the outcomes of the Council-endorsed preferred solutions from the Port Lands and South of Eastern Transportation and Servicing Master Plan (TSMP); and
Endorsement of a work program to initiate more detailed planning in key areas.

 

Finally, this report addresses Marine Terminal 35 given the recent fire at the site.

 
Port Lands Planning Framework

 

The Port Lands Planning Framework (the Framework) is a comprehensive, 50-plus year vision for the area. It provides a context for positive change and establishes new and enhanced policy direction for the area. The enhanced policy direction forms the basis for the recommended Official Plan modifications to the Central Waterfront Secondary Plan for the Port Lands. The May 16, 2017 report summarized the key findings of the Framework. The Framework is now complete and appended as Attachment 1.

 

Villiers Island Precinct Plan

 

Villiers Island will be the first mixed-use community to be developed in the Port Lands. The Precinct Plan (Attachment 2) expands on the policy directions established in the Planning Framework and further defines the vision for the Island. The vision for the Island is to create a new, sustainable mixed-use community that is primed to achieve a climate positive outcome and is surrounded by four unique waterside edges. The Precinct Plan provides supplementary direction to inform future Zoning By-law amendments and Plans of Subdivision.

 

Port Lands Official Plan Modification

 

A draft of the Official Plan modification to the CWSP for the Port Lands was endorsed in principle by Council at its July 2017 meeting. This draft modification incorporated feedback from the public and stakeholders. Since Council’s endorsement, staff generally made minor revisions to policies in the modification, to clarify its intent and purpose. The most notable revisions relate to parkland dedication and Section 37 policies, clarifying permissions for power generation uses, as well as to policies related to the timing of development based on feedback from the Province and the need for flood protection prior to permitting new and/or intensified uses. The final recommended Official Plan modification is included in Attachment 3.

 

Marine Terminal 35

 

Marine Terminal 35 was Listed on the City’s Heritage Register in 2004. The building recently caught fire and only a portion of it remains. The Toronto Port Lands Company is in the process of satisfying an order to remedy and unsafe building, issued by the Toronto Building Division, which includes a requirement to address the buildings heritage components and attributes to the satisfaction of Heritage Preservation Services. Pending the response to the order, a commemoration strategy may be required to determine how surviving elements considered to be significant within the remaining building will be incorporated within the future Promontory Park. Discussions are also ongoing related to existing leases and operations that will be impacted by the Port Lands Flood Protection project. A construction plan will be developed and reviewed by staff of the City, TPLC and Waterfront Toronto, including a thorough analysis of existing land leases impacted by the project. The precise timing for construction in the area of Marine Terminal 35 should be known by the end of 2017.

 

South of Eastern Transportation Official Plan Amendment

 

The City of Toronto Official Plan, as amended, is in force for the South of Eastern area. An amendment of the Official Plan is required to reflect the transportation network recommendations of the TSMP. The Official Plan Amendment is included in Attachment 4.

 

Work Program and Future Reporting

 

Revitalizing the Port Lands is one of the largest and most complex city-building projects in the City. While the completion of the Port Lands Planning Framework and Villiers Island Precinct Plan is a major accomplishment for advancing more detailed planning in the area, additional studies and work continues to be required in key areas. The Port Lands Planning Initiatives – Interim Report initiated two key priority projects – a Business and Implementation Plan (BIP) for the Port Lands and Phases 3 and 4 Class EAs for the Broadview Extensionand for Commissioners Street east of the Don Roadway. The City, with Waterfront Toronto, Divisions and other agencies, have now also identified additional priorities for more detailed study.

 

Staff are targeting the November 29, 2017 Executive Committee meeting for a comprehensive report on the implementation of Port Lands Flood Protection and the subsequent build out of the Port Lands. The report will provide detailed information on the Port Lands Flood Protection project, including proposed tri-government funding and cash flow requirements, as well as contribution agreement terms. In addition, the report will provide a status update on the development of the BIP for the build out of the Port Lands. This plan will address anticipated costs, revenues and phasing, as well as implementation roles and responsibilities. Finally, the report will comment on the broader "Waterfront 2.0" context, including the potential for funding for additional waterfront revitalization projects.

Background Information (Committee)
(September 27, 2017) Report and Attachment 4 from the Deputy City Manager, Cluster B on Port Lands Planning Initiatives - Final Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107844.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Section 1
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107821.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Section 2
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107822.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Section 3
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107823.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Section 4-1
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107836.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Section 4-2
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107837.pdf)

Attachment 1: Section 4-3
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107825.pdf)

Attachment 1: Section 4-4
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107826.pdf)

Attachment 1: Section 4-5
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107827.pdf)

Attachment 1: Section 4-6
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107828.pdf)

Attachment 1: Section 4-7
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107829.pdf)

Attachment 1: Section 4-8
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107830.pdf)

Attachment 1: Section 4-9
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107831.pdf)

Attachment 1: Section 4-10
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107832.pdf)

Attachment 1: Section 4-11
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107833.pdf)

Attachment 1: Section 4-12
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107834.pdf)

Attachment 1: Section 5
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107835.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Appendices
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107838.pdf)

Attachment 2: Part 1
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107839.pdf)

Attachment 2: Part 2
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107842.pdf)

Attachment 2: Part 3
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107843.pdf)

Attachment 3: Port Lands Official Plan Modification
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107840.pdf)

(September 19, 2017) Notice of Public Meeting to be held by the Planning and Growth Management Committee (under the Planning Act)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107841.pdf)

Port Lands Planning Initiatives Presentation
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-107824.pdf)

Speakers

Councillor Paula Fletcher
Julie Beddoes
Rosemary Frei
Mary Flynn-Guglietti, McMillan LLP, Solicitors for Ontario Power Generation
Ray Davies, Real Estate Strategy Manager, Ontario Power Generation
Cathie Macdonald, Co-Chair
John Wilson, Co-Chair, West Don Lands Committee
Councillor Paula Fletcher

Communications (Committee)
(September 29, 2017) Letter from Jane Pepino, Aird & Berlis LLP (PG.Main.PW24.6.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72700.pdf)

(October 10, 2017) Letter from Sandrine Exibard-Edgar, Property Administrator, Trans-Northern Pipelines Inc. (PG.Main.PG24.6.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72702.pdf)

(October 10, 2017) Letter from David Gerofsky, First Guld (PG.Main.PG24.6.3)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72704.pdf)

(October 11, 2017) Letter from Sedonia Loiacono, Aird & Berlis, representing 2034055 Ontario Ltd. (PG.Main.PG24.6.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72705.pdf)

(October 11, 2017) Letter from Sedonia Loiaconno, Aird & Berlis, representing Toronto Waterfront Studios Development Inc. (PG.Main.PG24.6.5)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72703.pdf)

(October 11, 2017) Letter from Kevin Dick, General Manager, Portlands Energy Centre (PG.Main.PG24.6.6)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72696.pdf)

(October 12, 2017) Letter from Connie Hergert, Vice-President, Real Estate and Services, Ontario Power Generation (PG.Main.PG24.6.7)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72697.pdf)

(October 12, 2017) Letter from John Lohmus, Associate and Senior Planner, IBI Group (PG.Main.PG24.6.8)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72698.pdf)

(October 12, 2017) Letter from Andrew Judge, President, Toronto Industry Network (PG.Main.PG24.6.9)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72699.pdf)

(October 12, 2017) Letter from Paul E. Johnston, Johnston Litavski Planning Consultants (PG.Main.PG24.6.10)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-72701.pdf)

(October 19, 2017) Letter from Jessie Spasov M.E.S., Sustainable Development Coordinator, CRH Canada Group Inc. (PG.Main.PG24.6.11)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73399.pdf)

(November 13, 2017) Letter from John Wilson and Cynthia Wilkey, Co-Chairs, West Don Lands Committee (PG.New.PG24.6.12)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73786.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) Letter from Christopher Sawicki, Vice-President, Infrastructure, PortsToronto (PG.New.PG24.6.13)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73854.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) Letter from Denise Baker, WeirFoulds LLP representing Tribal, Castlepoint, Kerbal (PG.New.PG24.6.14)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73884.pdf)

Communications (City Council)
(November 15, 2017) Letter from Dawne Jubb, Senior Legal Counsel, Toronto District School Board (CC.Main.PG24.6.15)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74150.pdf)

(December 4, 2017) Letter from Jim Douglas, General Manager, Real Estate, Canada Post Corporation (CC.New.PG24.6.16)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74291.pdf)

(December 4, 2017) Letter from Christopher J. Williams, Aird and Berlis LLP (CC.New.PG24.6.17)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74296.pdf)

(December 4, 2017) Letter from Daniel Castaldo, Senior Manager, Planning, Toronto District School Board (CC.New.PG24.6.18)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74372.pdf)

(December 4, 2017) Letter from Tom Halinski, Aird and Berlis LLP (CC.New.PG24.6.19)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74374.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) Letter from Paul Bronfman, Chair, Pinewood Toronto Studios, and Chair/Chief Executive Officer, Comweb Group Inc. and William F. White International Inc. (CC.New.PG24.6.20)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74377.pdf)

(November 13, 2017) Letter from Norman Di Pasquale, Waterfront for All (CC.New.PG24.6.21)

PG24.7

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:9 

Murray Road Regeneration and Land Use Study - City Initiated Official Plan Amendment and City Initiated Zoning By-law Amendments - Final Report
Bills 1466, 1467 and 1468 have been submitted on this Item.
Public Notice Given
Statutory - Planning Act, RSO 1990
Committee Recommendations

The Planning and Growth Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council amend the Official Plan, for the lands at 10, 20, 48, 54 and 62 Murray Road substantially in accordance with the draft Official Plan Amendment attached as Attachment 2 to the report (October 26, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning.

 
2.  City Council amend former City of North York Zoning By-law Number 625, for the lands at 10, 20, 48, 54 and 62 Murray Road substantially in accordance with the draft Zoning By-law Amendment attached as Attachment 3 to the report (October 26, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning.
 

3.  City Council amend City of Toronto Zoning By-law Number 569-2013 for the lands at 10, 20, 48, 54 and 62 Murray Road substantially in accordance with the draft Zoning By-law Amendment attached as Attachment 4 (October 26, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning; and  
 

4.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to make such stylistic and technical changes to the draft Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendments as may be required.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Planning and Growth Management Committee held a statutory public meeting on November 15, 2017, and notice was given in accordance with the Planning Act.

Origin
(October 26, 2017) Report from Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning
Summary

This report presents the conclusions of the Murray Road Regeneration and Land Use Study, and recommends amendments to the City of Toronto Official Plan. This report also recommends amendments to the former City of North York and the City of Toronto Zoning By-laws. An interim control by-law was enacted to prohibit certain land uses pending completion of this study. The Interim Control By-law expires on February 3, 2018.

 

The Murray Road Regeneration and Land Use Study makes recommendations on a planning framework for the Study area to support future growth as set out in Section 4.7 of the Official Plan for Regeneration Areas, and in Council's adopted Site and Area Specific Policy (SASP) 389 of OPA 231. The Study included an air and noise monitoring process as well as community consultation and engagement on issues related to land use, urban design, and pedestrian and cycling improvements throughout the local community. 

 

This report recommends that council adopt the City-initiated Official Plan Amendment (OPA), outlines key study findings from the local community and affected landowners and summarizes the revisions to the Site and Area Specific policies that are considered compatible with the existing surrounding employment and residential community.

 

The proposed Zoning By-law Amendments for the portion of the area in the former City of North York removes zoning permissions for concrete batching plants, a contractor’s establishment, motor vehicle body repair shop, transportation terminal and plastic product manufacturing use from the Study area. These permissions were temporarily suspended through the enactment of Interim Control By-law #71-2016 on February 3, 2016, and Extension of Interim Control By-law #115-2017 on January 31, 2017.

 

These permissions are considered incompatible with the surrounding community and the emerging vision for the Study area as outlined in the Regeneration Area designation and the subsequent City initiated land use study. The Study results envision a range of future employment and residential uses, compatible with the adjacent residential community, and which will provide new economic and housing opportunities. An improved pedestrian realm and enhanced cycling and pedestrian connections will provide access to local businesses, recreation and transit options, and connect together distinct communities.

 

Official Plan Amendment #208, which is the subject of this report, redesignates the Study area for Mixed Use Areas and General Employment Areas. The amendments to the Zoning By-laws also discussed in this report are consistent with the results of the regeneration study and resulting Official Plan Amendment No. 208. This report reviews and recommends approval of the City-initiated Zoning By-law amendments..

Background Information (Committee)
(October 26, 2017) Report and Attachments 1 - 8 from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on Murray Road Regeneration and Land Use Study - City Initiated Official Plan Amendment and City Initiated Zoning By-law Amendments - Final Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108531.pdf)

(October 25, 2017) Notice of Public Meeting to be held by the Planning and Growth Management Committee (under the Planning Act)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108532.pdf)

Speakers

Councillor Maria Augimeri

Communications (Committee)
(October 26, 2017) E-mail from Eli Lubinsky (PG.Main.PG24.7.1)
(November 7, 2017) E-mail from Vincenzo and Sara Bilardo (PG.New.PG24.7.2)
(November 8, 2017) E-mail from Fabio Biancolin (PG.New.PG24.7.3)
(November 9, 2017) Letter from Anthony Kyriakopoulos, Chair, Wilson Village Business Improvement Area (PG.New.PG24.7.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73565.pdf)

(November 10, 2017) E-mail from Tony Abate (PG.New.PG24.7.5)
(November 10, 2017) E-mail from John Teti (PG.New.PG24.7.6)
(November 12, 2017) E-mail from Michelle Lombardi-Mellace (PG.New.PG24.7.7)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Jean O'Grady (PG.New.PG24.7.8)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Sam Bootsma (PG.New.PG24.7.9)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Rita Abate (PG.New.PG24.7.10)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Lena Abboud-Kakish and my family (PG.New.PG24.7.11)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Edmund Li (PG.New.PG24.7.12)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Roy Teskey (PG.New.PG24.7.13)
(November 14, 2017) Letter from Wayne London, President, Innocon (PG.New.PG24.7.14)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73885.pdf)


PG24.8

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:All 

Zoning By-law and Zoning By-law Amendments to Permit Short-term Rentals
The Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning has submitted a supplementary report on this Item (PG24.8a for information)

Communications PG24.8.37 to PG24.8.142 have been submitted on this Item.

To be considered with Item LS23.1 as first Items on Thursday, December 7th

Bills 1450 and 1451 have been submitted on this Item.
Public Notice Given
Statutory - Planning Act, RSO 1990
Committee Recommendations

The Planning and Growth Management Committee recommends that:

 

1.  City Council amend Attachments 1 and 2 to the report (October 19, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning to not allow Secondary Suites to be used as Short-term Rentals.

 

2.  City Council enact zoning by-law amendments substantially in accordance with Attachments 1 and 2, as amended by Recommendation 1 above, to the report (October 19, 2017) from the Acting chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning.

 

3.  City Council authorize the City Solicitor to make such stylistic and technical changes to each zoning by-law amendment as may be required.

Committee Decision Advice and Other Information

The Planning and Growth Management Committee:

 

1.  Requested the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning to report directly to City Council on December 6, 2017 if he wishes to clarify or modify any recommendations.

 

The Director, Zoning and Secretary-Treasurer, Committee of Adjustment, City Planning and the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards gave a presentation on Short-term Rentals.

 

The Planning and Growth Management Committee held a statutory public meeting on November 15, 2017, and notice was given in accordance with the Planning Act.

Origin
(October 19, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning
Summary

This report recommends the adoption of a city-wide stand-alone zoning by-law and zoning by-law amendments to all applicable general zoning by-laws to permit short-term rentals.  For details on the proposed short-term rental licence and registry, refer to the Short-term Rental Licensing and Registration Report to Licensing and Standards Committee on November 16, 2017.  For details on the potential hotel and short-term rental tax refer to the Short-term Rental and Hotel Tax report to Executive Committee on November 29, 2017.

 

Staff have considered the research and input received to date and weighed this information to develop balanced regulations that intend to promote consumer protection, public safety, and the economic, social and environmental health of the city. Consistent with these overarching objectives, the proposed regulations are intended to maximize the benefits of short-term rentals and minimize their negative impacts consistent with the principles in the City's Official Plan. The proposed short-term rental zoning by-law amendments are based on the following principles:

 

-   Allow people to rent their homes for short periods;
-   Minimize negative impacts on housing affordability and availability;
-   Maintain community stability, including in vertical communities;
-   Minimize nuisances, such as noise and garbage; and,
-   Enable greater diversity in tourism accommodations.

 
The proposed zoning by-law and zoning by-law amendments will permit short-term rentals across the city in the principal residence of any owner or tenant in residential and mixed use zones. Within their principal residences, people could rent: up to three rooms within a dwelling unit; the entire dwelling unit; and one lawful secondary suite. A short-term rental is not permitted in a dwelling unit that is not a principal residence. This restriction limits the ability to convert long-term housing units to accommodation for tourists.

 

In addition to policy and research, the recommendations in this report were developed based on extensive consultation. Staff sought input from the public and stakeholders through online surveys, public meetings, focus groups with short-term rental operators and users, and meetings with representatives from the short-term rental and tourism industries and community and neighborhood organizations.  Generally, there was no complete consensus from the public on how to permit short-term rentals.

 

The following City divisions were consulted in the preparation of this report: Municipal Licensing and Standards; Affordable Housing Office; Corporate Finance; Economic Development and Culture; Legal Services; Shelter, Support and Housing Administration; Social Development, Finance and Administration; Toronto Fire Services; and Toronto Building.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 19, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on Zoning By-law and Zoning By-law Amendments to Permit Short-term Rentals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108276.pdf)

Attachment 1: Draft City-wide Stand-alone Zoning By-law to Permit Short-term Rentals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108277.pdf)

Attachment 2: Draft Zoning By-law Amendments to all Applicable General Zoning By-laws to Permit Short-term Rentals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108278.pdf)

(October 23, 2017) Corrected Notice of Public Meeting to be held by the Planning and Growth Management Committee (under the Planning Act)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108411.pdf)

(October 23, 2017) Notice of Public Meeting to be held by the Planning and Growth Management Committee (under the Planning Act)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108410.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) Presentation on Short-term Rentals
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-109120.pdf)

Background Information (City Council)
(November 28, 2017) Supplementary report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on Clarification on the proposed Zoning Permissions for Short-term Rentals in Secondary Suites (PG24.8a)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-109724.pdf)

Speakers

Zach Mandlowitz, President, Home-Sharing Service Providers
Caitlin O’Neill
Ryan Killeen, Sonder
Alex Dagg, Policy Manager, Airbnb
Maria Nunes, Registered Lobbyist 32564S-1
Peter Thoma, urbanMetrics
Sophia Virani
Mason Matahet
Richard de Sam Lazaro, HomeAway Inc.
Veronica Wynne, Vice President, Swansea Area Ratepayers Association
Paul Nedoszytko
Melissa Goldstein, Chair, Housing Action Now
Thorben Wieditz
Agata Wisniowska
Carla Parkinson
Emily Rayson
John Phillips
Councillor Josh Matlow

Communications (Committee)
(September 1, 2017) Submission from David Adamson, President, Highland Creek Community Association (PG.Main.PG24.8.1)
(November 10, 2017) Letter from Anne Hayes, Chair, On behalf of The Torontonian Tenants’ Association (PG.New.PG24.8.2)
(November 13, 2017) Letter from Patricia Marson Vaughan (PG.New.PG24.8.3)
(November 13, 2017) Letter from Peter Bruer, Manager, Conflict Resolution & Training St. Stephen's Community House (PG.New.PG24.8.4)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73678.pdf)

(November 13, 2017) Letter from Terry Mundell, President and Chief Executive Officer, Greater Toronto Hotel Association and Tony Elenis, President and Chief Executive Officer, Ontario Restaurant Hotel & Motel Association (PG.New.PG24.8.5)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73739.pdf)

(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Christopher Brown (PG.New.PG24.8.6)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Christopher Binney (PG.New.PG24.8.7)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Michelle Mawhinney (PG.New.PG24.8.8)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Emanuele Silli (PG.New.PG14.8.9)
(November 13, 2017) E-mail from Shelley Stillman (PG.New.PG24.8.10)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Teddy Ghalustians (PG.New.PG24.8.11)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Lesley McAllister (PG.New.PG24.8.12)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Claire Louise Gallagher (PG.New.PG24.8.13)
(November 15, 2017) Letter from Melissa Goldstein, Chair, Housing Action Now (PG.New.PG24.8.14)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73846.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) Letter from Peter Bangarth and Melanie Tait (PG.New.PG24.8.15)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Gillian Wotton (PG.New.PG24.8.16)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Jeremy Dias, Executive Director, Canadian Centre for Gender and Sexual Diversity (PG.New.PG24.8.17)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73858.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) Letter from Vincent Morra, President, Toronto Short Term Rental (TSTR) Property Management and Mark Dellamano, President and Owner, NOTL Vacation Rentals (PG.New.PG24.8.18)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73867.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Doris Power (PG.New.PG24.8.19)
(November 14, 2017) Letter from Margarita Mendez, Executive Director, Nellie's (PG.New.PG24.8.20)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73831.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Vicki Trottier (PG.New.PG24.8.21)
(November 14, 2017) Letter from Kenneth Hale, Director of Advocacy and Legal Services (PG.New.PG24.8.22)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73870.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) Letter from Daryl Chong, President and Chief Executive Officer, Greater Toronto Apartment Association (PG.New.PG24.8.23)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73871.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Holly Aucoin (PG.New.PG24.8.24)
(November 14, 2017) Letter from Geordie Dent, Executive Director - Federation of Metro Tenants Association (PG.New.PG24.8.25)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73836.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Janet Coles (PG.New.PG24.8.26)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Jerry Raso (PG.New.PG24.8.27)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Brian Tyndale (PG.New.PG24.8.28)
(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Alvin Cheung (PG.New.PG24.8.29)
(November 14, 2017) Submission from Zachary Mandlowitz, President, Home-Sharing Service Providers (HSSP)  (PG.New.PG24.8.30)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73886.pdf)

(November 14, 2017) E-mail from Jacqueline Porter (PG.New.PG24.8.31)
(November 14, 2017) Letter from Tim Syrianos, President, Toronto Real Estate Board (PG.New.PG24.8.32)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73888.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) Letter from Dominique Russell, Chair, Friends of Kensington Market (PG.New.PG24.8.33)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73889.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) E-mail from John Provat (PG.New.PG24.8.34)
(November 15, 2017) Submission from Peter Thoma, Partner, Urban Metrics Inc. (PG.New.PG24.8.35)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73922.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) Letter from Monika Wagner and Norman Verrall (PG.New.PG24.8.36)
Communications (City Council)
(November 15, 2017) E-mail from Mark Orr (CC.Main.PG24.8.37)
(November 15, 2017) E-mail from Chris Brown (CC.Main.PG24.8.38)
(November 15, 2017) E-mail from Katharine Matte (CC.Main.PG24.8.39)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Michael Lewis (CC.Main.PG24.8.40)
(November 17, 2017) E-mail from Judy Berger (CC.Main.PG24.8.41)
(November 21, 2017) E-mail from Sidra Rizvi (CC.Main.PG24.8.42)
(November 24, 2017) E-mail from Miranda Borisenko (CC.Main.PG24.8.43)
(November 27, 2017) E-mail from Michael Daley (CC.Main.PG24.8.44)
(November 16, 2017) E-mail from Mark Orr (CC.Main.PG24.8.45)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Mitchell Posluns (CC.New.PG24.8.46)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Sara Weales (CC.New.PG24.8.47)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Andree-Anne Forest-Voyer (CC.New.PG24.8.48)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Teresa Gough (CC.New.PG24.8.49)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Tai Moor (CC.New.PG24.8.50)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Krzysztof Maryan (CC.New.PG24.8.51)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Lorie McLaughlin (CC.New.PG24.8.52)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Jamal Virani (CC.New.PG24.8.53)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Christopher Thompson (CC.New.PG24.8.54)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from David Hogarth (CC.New.PG24.8.55)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Paulo Figueiras (CC.New.PG24.8.56)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Dawn Bazely (CC.New.PG24.8.57)
(November 17, 2017) E-mail from Ralph MacLeod (CC.New.PG24.8.58)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Lisa Cain (CC.New.PG24.8.59)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Shane Zuchowski (CC.New.PG24.8.60)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Emily Mantin (CC.New.PG24.8.61)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Claude Babin (CC.New.PG24.8.62)
(November 30, 2017) E-mail from Alyas Ali (CC.New.PG24.8.63)
(December 1, 2017) E-mail from Valerie Lannon (CC.New.PG24.8.64)
(December 4, 2017) Letter from Geoff Kettel and Cathie Macdonald, Co-Chairs, Federation of North Toronto Residents' Associations (CC.New.PG24.8.65)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74354.pdf)

(December 4, 2017) Letter from Susan Wankiewicz, Clinic Director, Landlord's Self-Help Centre (CC.New.PG24.8.66)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74355.pdf)

(December 3, 2017) E-mail from Diane Devenyi (CC.New.PG24.8.67)
(December 4, 2017) Letter from Daryl Chong, President and Chief Executive Officer, Greater Toronto Apartment Association (CC.New.PG24.8.68)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74295.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Matt Caissie (CC.New.PG24.8.69)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Darnell Moses (CC.New.PG24.8.70)
(December 4, 2017) E-mail from Doug Ewart (CC.New.PG24.8.71)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Liviu Cojocaru (CC.New.PG24.8.72)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Pulickel and Poornima Ajayan (CC.New.PG24.8.73)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Carrie Gervais (CC.New.PG24.8.74)
(December 5, 2017) Letter from Eileen Denny, President, Teddington Park Residents Association Inc.  (CC.New.PG24.8.75)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74425.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) E-mail from David Lidov (CC.New.PG24.8.76)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Joanne Hansen (CC.New.PG24.8.77)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Indra Morrison (CC.New.PG24.8.78)
(December 5, 2017) Letter from Linda McCarthy, Vice-President, Lytton Park Residents' Organization Inc. (CC.New.PG24.8.79)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74429.pdf)

(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Jeff Timmons (CC.New.PG24.8.80)
(December 5, 2017) Letter from Kathleen Henderson (CC.New.PG24.8.81)
(November 16, 2017) Letter from Jennifer Graham (CC.New.PG24.8.82)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Sean Beckett (CC.New.PG24.8.83)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Brenda Lowes (CC.New.PG24.8.84)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Rahim Lalani (CC.New.PG24.8.85)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Carlos Lopes (CC.New.PG24.8.86)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Shannon Villeneuve-Shulman (CC.New.PG24.8.87)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Papia Barua (CC.New.PG24.8.88)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from AJ Huang (CC.New.PG24.8.89)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Mumtaz and Amin Virani (CC.New.PG24.8.90)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Janis Targum (CC.New.PG24.8.91)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Fotini Iconomopoulos (CC.New.PG24.8.92)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Suzanne Anderson (CC.New.PG24.8.93)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Devesh Modi (CC.New.PG24.8.94)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Ines Pacheco (CC.New.PG24.8.95)
(December 6, 2017) Letter from Feliks and Ines Jarki (CC.New.PG24.8.96)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Des Narciso (CC.New.PG24.8.97)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Marian Mattison (CC.New.PG24.8.98)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Karen Teune (CC.New.PG24.8.99)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Catherine Van Dyke (CC.New.PG24.8.100)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Hanna Gry (CC.New.PG24.8.101)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Peter Neumann and Louise Gwyn (CC.New.PG24.8.102)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Sharon Tiessen (CC.New.PG24.8.103)
(December 6, 2017) E-mail from Donna and Tom Hunt (CC.New.PG24.8.104)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Alex Cruz (CC.New.PG24.8.105)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Dylan Juckes (CC.New.PG24.8.106)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Sharry Aiken and Miriam Kramer (CC.New.PG24.8.107)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Ariel Benibgui (CC.New.PG24.8.108)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Nikesha Trumpet (CC.New.PG24.8.109)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Shannon Hancocks (CC.New.PG24.8.110)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Christina Moro (CC.New.PG24.8.111)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Sean Mckay (CC.New.PG24.8.112)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Brenda Dalglish (CC.New.PG24.8.113)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Simon and Catherine (CC.New.PG24.8.114)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Michael Krimus (CC.New.PG24.8.115)
(December 5, 2017) E-mail from Dwyke Young (CC.New.PG24.8.116)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Kathleen Le Roux (CC.New.PG24.8.117)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Tonia Vuolo (CC.New.PG24.8.118)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Michelle Webb (CC.New.PG24.8.119)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Abigail Pugh (CC.New.PG24.8.120)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Ainsley (CC.New.PG24.8.121)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Jason Schwartz (CC.New.PG24.8.122)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Ananda More (CC.New.PG24.8.123)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Rouzbeh (CC.New.PG24.8.124)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Adrian Golombek (CC.New.PG24.8.125)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Papia Barua (CC.New.PG24.8.126)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Frank Yin (CC.New.PG24.8.127)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Julian Solis (CC.New.PG24.8.128)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Sue Robertson (CC.New.PG24.8.129)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Liane Ninja (CC.New.PG24.8.130)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Mandie Freire (CC.New.PG24.8.131)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from George Filtsos (CC.New.PG24.8.132)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Alexis Leino (CC.New.PG24.8.133)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Vic S (CC.New.PG24.8.134)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Philippe Gauthier (CC.New.PG24.8.135)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Valeri Oparychev (CC.New.PG24.8.136)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Sylvester Nicholas (CC.New.PG24.8.137)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Cathy Liu (CC.New.PG24.8.138)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Esther Epp (CC.New.PG24.8.139)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Priscilla Lee (CC.New.PG24.8.140)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Nikola Curcin (CC.New.PG24.8.141)
(December 7, 2017) E-mail from Samaria Mazan (CC.New.PG24.8.142)
(December 7, 2017) Multiple Communications from 780 individuals. List of communications PG24.8.143 to PG24.8.923  (CC.New.PG24.8.)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/cc/comm/communicationfile-74384.pdf)


PG24.9

ACTION 

 

 

Ward:26 

Don Mills Crossing: Community Building at Don Mills and Eglinton - Phase 2 Report
Communication PG24.9.3 has been submitted on this Item.
Committee Recommendations

The Planning and Growth Management Committee recommends that:  

 

1.  City Council direct the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning to use the Public Realm Plan Report contained in Attachment 2 to the report (October 27, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, as a basis for undertaking stakeholder and public consultations to inform the preparation of a proposed Secondary Plan for the Don Mills Crossing Core Study Area.

 

2.  City Council request the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning to bring forward a proposed Secondary Plan and supporting implementation strategies for the Don Mills Crossing Core Study Area based on the Public Realm Plan report contained in Attachment 2 to the report (October 27, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, and informed by the consultations in Recommendation 1 by the second quarter of 2018.

 

3.  City Council direct staff to review applications for official plan amendments and/or rezoning applications in the area subject to the Don Mills Crossing study in the context of advancing the Public Realm Plan report contained in Attachment 2 to the report (October 27, 2017) from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning.

Origin
(October 27, 2017) Report from Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning
Summary

This report recommends approval in principle of the Public Realm Plan for the Don Mills Crossing study area.  The Public Realm Plan is one of the Study outcomes that will be used to guide future development.  The Plan will serve as the organizing structure for the preparation of a Secondary Plan.  The Public Realm Plan is accompanied by four guiding principles which will ensure the creation of a complete and connected community: Create a Vibrant Mixed Use Community; Connect with Nature and Build Resiliency; Enhance Mobility Choice, Comfort and Connectivity; and Support Inclusive City Building. These principles align with Provincial and municipal policies related to appropriate intensification around transit facilities. 

 

Launched in June 2016, the Don Mills Crossing study is the outcome of City Council's May 2014 adoption of Eglinton Connects and its June 2016 settlement of an Ontario Municipal Board appeal for the Celestica lands, a 60 acre parcel located at the northwest corner of Don Mills Road and Eglinton Avenue East.  Both Council decisions require the development of a comprehensive planning framework prior to new development occurring in the area. 

 

Don Mills Crossing is a three-phase study.  In January 2017, Planning and Growth Management Committee adopted the Profile Report completed at the conclusion of Phase 1.  During Phase 2, a Public Realm Plan and guiding principles were developed and refined through a series of community and stakeholder consultation events.  This report marks the conclusion of this phase and sets the stage for preparation of a Secondary Plan for the Don Mills Crossing Core Study Area through additional analysis and policy development.   

 

The Public Realm Plan proposes to enhance the relationship between the natural setting of the area and future development which will serve as both a placemaking and a resiliency strategy.  A key component of the Plan is improved connectivity to help ensure that future intensification does not occur in isolation, but connects to the surrounding communities.  These new connections should be at a pedestrian scale, concentrating community services and employment opportunities within walking distance of transit, important neighbourhood destinations and cultural resources.  This will assist in ensuring the cumulative benefit of public investment in transit, pedestrian and community infrastructure and new development extends beyond the Don Mills and Eglinton study area and into the surrounding communities. The Public Realm Plan will serve to structure the pattern of future development parcels and support the day-to-day activities of residents and workers in a pedestrian friendly, transit oriented environment. 

 

Phase 2 of the Don Mills Crossing study also explored how key components of the Public Realm Plan and supporting principles could be advanced through City-wide initiatives including the Ravine Strategy, the Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan and TransformTO.  The objective was to ensure that growth and investment in the Don Mills Crossing area works to advance city-wide initiatives at the local level. 

 

This report recommends that City Council adopt the attached Public Realm Plan Report as the basis to undertake stakeholder and public consultation that will inform the preparation of a new Secondary Plan.  The proposed Secondary Plan is targeted to be brought forward for Planning and Growth Management Committee's consideration in the second quarter of 2018.

Background Information (Committee)
(October 27, 2017) Report from the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning on Don Mills Crossing: Community Building at Don Mills and Eglinton - Phase 2 Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108526.pdf)

Attachment 1 - Public Realm Plan and Guiding Principles
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108527.pdf)

Attachment 2 - Don Mills Crossing Public Realm Plan Report
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/bgrd/backgroundfile-108529.pdf)

Communications (Committee)
(November 14, 2017) Letter from Christopher J. Tanzola, Overland LLP (PG.New.PG24.9.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73780.pdf)

(November 15, 2017) Letter from Geoff Kettel, Chair, North York Community Preservation Panel (PG.New.PG24.9.2)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pg/comm/communicationfile-73953.pdf)