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The City gives notice to the public on a variety of different matters, such as fees and charges, heritage designations, renaming of roads, and sale of property.

The City also gives notice through the newspaper, mail, or personal service, depending on legislation.

Current notices are listed below by date of posting. You can search for a current notice by word, phrase, topic, municipal ward, and/or date. You can also search past notices and access open data by clicking Search & Open Data.

Notice of Intention to Designate - 280 Jarvis Street and 288-290 Jarvis Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2019-04-16

Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 280 Jarvis Street and 288-290 Jarvis Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

280 Jarvis Street:

Reasons for Designation

The property at 280 Jarvis Street, containing a semi-detached house-form building, is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.   

Description

Located north of Gerrard Street East on the west side of Jarvis Street in the Garden District, the property at 280 Jarvis Street (originally known as 280-282 Jarvis Street) contains a pair of two-and-a-half storey, semi-detached houses, designed in the Richardsonian Romanesque Style and built as one of three pairs, extending from 280-290 Jarvis Street, by William Carlyle in 1890.  In 1955 the semis at 280-282 Jarvis Street were converted to a lodging house and in 1972 were united as a single unit for office use at which time the property became known as 280 Jarvis Street.  The design of the principal elevation of this pair of semis is mirrored by the other pair constructed at 288-290 Jarvis Street.  In 1966, the pair at 284-286 Jarvis Street was demolished and their design as the centrepiece of the composition of the three buildings remains unknown. In 1973, City Council adopted a recommendation to include the property on the City's first Heritage Inventory.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

William Carlyle's pair of semi-detached houses at 280 Jarvis Street is an excellent example of the Richardsonian Romanesque.  The style is evident in the picturesque massing of the principal, east elevation with its canted south-east corner rising as a turret, the broad archway framing recessed entries, the bay window at the second storey and the roofscape, with its octagonal, pyramid roof, dormers and two chimneys.  The materials, sandstone, brick and terracotta, which is used in the shingles with scalloped or diamond-shaped tiles, decoratively-molded string courses and roof-top finials, are all quintessential Richardsonian Romanesque features. A high degree of artistic merit is evident in the way the elevations of the pair is treated as a united whole so that each semi has different features rather than the predictable symmetry with identical doors and windows.  Further, 280 and 288-290 Jarvis Street were constructed as mirror images of one another so that their prominent towers would anchor the outer corners of the whole assembly of the three pairs of semi-detached houses, creating a handsome group on Jarvis Street.

The houses have historical value for their association with their builder, William Carlyle (1820-1903) a Scottish immigrant and successful contractor who was elected Alderman for St. Thomas's Ward (1879-1890), served as Chairman of the Board of Works for the City of Toronto and was appointed Justice of the Peace for Toronto in 1884. 

The properties have associative value as they contribute to an understanding of the historical development of Jarvis Street, representing the period of the street when it evolved as an attractive, late 19th-century avenue of broad, tree-lined boulevards faced with civic and religious institutions, grand estate homes and a range of more modest housing types.  

Contextually, the Carlyle houses are important for maintaining and supporting the late 19th-century character of Jarvis Street as well as contributing to the diversity of periods which the street presents as a record of its evolution.  Located in the Garden District on the west side of the street on the block between Gerrard and Carlton streets, the two pairs of semi-detached houses maintain the setback and landscaped setting typical of 19th-century residential properties on Jarvis Street.  Across the street, on the east side, are 19th-century buildings and a public space including the Jarvis Street Baptist Church (1875), the former Samuel Platt House (1849-50), Allan Gardens (1860) and St. Andrews Church (1878).  To the north of the Carlyle houses, at 300 Jarvis Street, is the 1930 Art Deco Frontenac Arms hotel (now the Ramada Inn).  To the south, at the intersection of Jarvis and Gerrard, is the Spanish-Revival Crown Hotel (now the Econo Lodge) at 335 Jarvis Street, and the Mid-century Modern, Juvenile and Family Courts Building at 311 Jarvis Street.  These buildings and public spaces are just a small selection of the significantly rich collection of Toronto architecture and public amenities representing diverse periods, typologies and styles that characterise Jarvis Street.  Constructed in 1890, the two pairs of semi-detached houses are physically, visually and historically linked to their surroundings, contributing to the architectural diversity of this historically important Toronto thoroughfare. 

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the Carlyle houses at 280 Jarvis Street are:

-    The setback, placement and orientation of the building on its property on the west side of Jarvis, north of Gerrard Street East in the Garden District

-    The setting of the house with the landscaped area in front of the house including the mature trees

-    The scale, form and massing of the two-and-a-half storey house with its rectangular plan with a canted, south-east corner rising as a turret, the east-facing sloped roof with an octagonal pyramid roof and two dormers, recessed entrance under a broad arch with its canted walls, rear, two-storey flat-roofed wing and two chimneys near the front, east elevation

-    The cladding material which includes rusticated sandstone of two types, red brick and terracotta shingles in scalloped and diamond shapes

-    The windows openings including the ground floor openings of various rectangular sizes, the second floor bay window with its wood mouldings and panels, the  pair of windows in the turret, single window on the canted corner and pair of smaller windows on the centre of the elevation, on the attic storey, the single window with three lights in the large dormer, the single opening in the small dormer and the pair of windows and single window in the turret

-    The window glazing which includes stained glass in the upper four lights of the bay window on the second floor

-    The primary entrance with its broad arch of sandstone, canted walls with small windows and pair of doors

-    The decorative terracotta elements including the sandstone belt courses and window sills, terracotta reliefs on the arch, wrapping the turret between the first and second storeys and the terracotta finials and

-    The decorative brick elements including the bands of alternating projecting brick headers between the top of the second storey and the eaves and third storey and in the recessed panels under the central pair of windows at the second storey

288-290 Jarvis Street

Reasons for Designation

The properties at 288-290 Jarvis Street, containing a semi-detached house-form building, are worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value, and meet Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.   

Description

Located just north of Gerrard Street East on the west side of Jarvis Street in the Garden District, the properties at 288-290 Jarvis Street contain a pair of two-and-a-half storey, semi-detached houses, designed in the Richardsonian Romanesque Style and built as one of three pairs, extending from 280-290 Jarvis Street, by William Carlyle in 1890.  The semis at 288-290 Jarvis Street were converted to lodging houses and then in 1969 they were converted for office use.  The design of the principal elevation at this pair of semis is mirrored by the other pair constructed at 280 Jarvis Street (originally known as 280-282 Jarvis Street).  In 1966, the pair at 284-286 Jarvis Street was demolished and their design as the centrepiece of the composition of the three buildings remains unknown.  In 1973, City Council adopted a recommendation to include the properties on the City's first Heritage Inventory.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

William Carlyle's pair of semi-detached houses at 288-290 Jarvis Street is an excellent example of the Richardsonian Romanesque.  This style is evident in the picturesque massing of the principal, east elevation with its canted north-east corner rising as a turret, the broad archway framing recessed entries, the bay window at the second storey and the roofscape, with its octagonal pyramid roof and dormers.  The materials, sandstone, brick and terracotta, which is used in the shingles with scalloped or diamond-shaped tiles, decoratively-molded string courses and roof-top finials, are all quintessential Richardsonian Romanesque features. A high degree of artistic merit is evident in the way the elevations of the pair is treated as a united whole so that each semi has different features rather than the predictable symmetry with identical doors and windows.  Further, 280 and 288-290 Jarvis Street were constructed as mirror images of one another so that their prominent towers would anchor the outer corners of the whole assembly of the three pairs of semi-detached houses, creating a handsome group on Jarvis Street.

The houses have historical value for their association with their builder, William Carlyle (1820-1903) a Scottish immigrant and successful contractor who was elected Alderman for St. Thomas's Ward (1879-1890), served as Chairman of the Board of Works for the City of Toronto and was appointed Justice of the Peace for Toronto in 1884. 

The properties have associative value as they contribute to an understanding of the historical development of Jarvis Street, representing the period of the street when it evolved as an attractive late 19th-century avenue of broad, tree-lined boulevards faced with civic and religious institutions, grand estate homes and a range of modest housing types.  

Contextually, the Carlyle houses are important for maintaining and supporting the late 19th-century character of Jarvis Street as well as contributing to the diversity of periods which the street presents as a record of its evolution.  Located in the Garden District on the west side of the street on the block between Gerrard and Carlton streets, the two pairs of semi-detached houses maintain the setback and landscaped setting typical of 19th-century residential properties.  Across the street, on the east side, are 19th-century buildings and a public space including the Jarvis Street Baptist Church (1875), the former Samuel Platt House (1849-50), Allan Gardens (1860) and St. Andrews Church (1878).  To the north of the Carlyle houses, at 300 Jarvis Street, is the 1930 Art Deco Frontenac Arms hotel (now the Ramada Inn).  To the south, at the intersection of Jarvis and Gerrard, is the Spanish-Revival Crown Hotel (now the Econo Lodge) at 335 Jarvis Street, and the Mid-century Modern, Juvenile and Family Courts Building at 311 Jarvis Street.  These buildings and public spaces are just a small selection of the significantly rich collection of Toronto architecture and public amenities representing diverse periods, typologies and styles that characterise Jarvis Street.  Constructed in 1890, the two pairs of semi-detached houses are physically, visually and historically linked to their surroundings, contributing to the architectural diversity of this historically important Toronto thoroughfare. 

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the Carlyle houses at 288-290 Jarvis Street are:

-    The setback, placement and orientation of the building on its property on the west side of Jarvis, north of Gerrard Street East in the Garden District

-    The setting of the house with the landscaped space in front of the house

-    The scale, form and massing of the two-and-a-half storey house with its rectangular plan with a canted, north-east corner rising as a turret, the east-facing sloped roof with an octagonal pyramid roof and two dormers, recessed entrance under a broad arch with its canted walls and rear, two-storey flat-roofed wing

-    The cladding material which includes rusticated sandstone of two types, red brick and terracotta shingles in scalloped and diamond shapes

-    The windows openings including the ground floor openings of various rectangular sizes, the second floor bay window with its wood mouldings and panels, the pair of windows in the turret, single window on the canted corner and pair of smaller windows on the centre of the elevation, on the attic storey, the single window with three lights in the large dormer, the single opening in the small dormer and the pair of windows and single window in the turret

-    The window glazing which may include stained glass under the wood panels at the first floor and in the turret, the double hung sash window with multiple lights in the upper sash

-    The primary entrance with its broad arch of sandstone, canted walls with small windows and pair of doors

-    The decorative terracotta elements including the sandstone belt courses and window sills, terracotta reliefs on the arch, wrapping the turret between the first and second storeys and the single terracotta finial

-    The decorative brick elements including the bands of alternating projecting brick headers between the top of the second storey and the eaves and third storey and in the recessed panels under the central pair of windows at the second storey

-    The wood rafters at the eaves

Notice of an objection to the proposed designations may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of April 16, 2019, which is May 16, 2019. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

Notice of Passing of By-law - 33 Murray Avenue

Topic

  • Heritage > Designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2019-04-15

Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 535-2019 to designate 33 Murray Avenue (Ward 23 – Scarborough North) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

Notice Date

2019-04-12

To consider a proposal to name a public lane north of College Street, extending between Crawford Street and Montrose Street as “Galipo Brothers Lane".

The plan showing the lands to be affected may be seen in the City Clerk's Office, Secretariat, 2nd Floor, West Tower, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. At its meeting to be held in Committee Room 1, 2nd floor, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, on April 24, 2019, at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Toronto and East York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

Notice to People writing or making presentations to the Toronto and East York Community Council:  The personal information contained in your correspondence to Toronto City Council or its committees is collected under the City of Toronto Act, 2006, and the City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27 – Council Procedures, section 27-21. Any personal information will become part of the public record and may be posted on the City's website, unless you expressly request the removal of personal identity information. Questions about the collection of this information may be directed to the City Clerk's office at 416-392-7033.

The City videotapes committee and community council meetings. If you make a presentation to a committee or community council, the City will be videotaping you and City staff may make the video tapes available to the public.

To obtain additional information, submit comments or address the Toronto and East York Community Council meeting on April 24, 2019, please contact Ellen Devlin, Toronto and East York Community Council Administrator no later than 12:00 p.m. on April 23, 2019.

Notice Date

2019-04-12

To consider a proposal to name an existing public lane in the block bounded by Harbord Street, Palmerston Boulevard, Ulster Street and Euclid Avenue as " Jewish Folk Choir Lane".

The plan showing the lands to be affected may be seen in the City Clerk's Office, Secretariat, 2nd Floor, West Tower, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. At its meeting to be held in Committee Room 1, 2nd floor, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, on April 24, at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Toronto and East York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

Notice to People writing or making presentations to the Toronto and East York Community Council:  The personal information contained in your correspondence to Toronto City Council or its committees is collected under the City of Toronto Act, 2006, and the City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27 – Council Procedures, section 27-21. Any personal information will become part of the public record and may be posted on the City's website, unless you expressly request the removal of personal identity information. Questions about the collection of this information may be directed to the City Clerk's office at 416-392-7033.

The City videotapes committee and community council meetings. If you make a presentation to a committee or community council, the City will be videotaping you and City staff may make the video tapes available to the public.

To obtain additional information, submit comments or address the Toronto and East York Community Council meeting on April 24, 2019, please contact Ellen Devlin, Toronto and East York Community Council Administrator no later than 12:00 p.m. on April 23, 2019.

 

Notice Date

2019-04-12

To consider a proposal to rename a portion of the existing public highway "Pears Avenue" extending west from Yonge Street as “Basil Johnson Terrace".

The plan showing the lands to be affected may be seen in the City Clerk's Office, Secretariat, 2nd Floor, West Tower, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. At its meeting to be held in Committee Room 1, 2nd floor, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, on April 24, 2019, at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Toronto and East York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

Notice to People writing or making presentations to the Toronto and East York Community Council:  The personal information contained in your correspondence to Toronto City Council or its committees is collected under the City of Toronto Act, 2006, and the City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27 – Council Procedures, section 27-21. Any personal information will become part of the public record and may be posted on the City's website, unless you expressly request the removal of personal identity information. Questions about the collection of this information may be directed to the City Clerk's office at 416-392-7033.

The City videotapes committee and community council meetings. If you make a presentation to a committee or community council, the City will be videotaping you and City staff may make the video tapes available to the public.

To obtain additional information, submit comments or address the Toronto and East York Community Council meeting on April 24, 2019, please contact Ellen Devlin, Toronto and East York Community Council Administrator no later than 12:00 p.m. on April 23, 2019.

Notice Date

2019-04-12

To consider a proposal to name a public lane west of Yonge Street, extending north from Wellesley Street West as “Bistro Lane".

The plan showing the lands to be affected may be seen in the City Clerk's Office, Secretariat, 2nd Floor, West Tower, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. At its meeting to be held in Committee Room 1, 2nd floor, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, on April 24, 2019, at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Toronto and East York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

Notice to People writing or making presentations to the Toronto and East York Community Council:  The personal information contained in your correspondence to Toronto City Council or its committees is collected under the City of Toronto Act, 2006, and the City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27 – Council Procedures, section 27-21. Any personal information will become part of the public record and may be posted on the City's website, unless you expressly request the removal of personal identity information. Questions about the collection of this information may be directed to the City Clerk's office at 416-392-7033.

The City videotapes committee and community council meetings. If you make a presentation to a committee or community council, the City will be videotaping you and City staff may make the video tapes available to the public.

To obtain additional information, submit comments or address the Toronto and East York Community Council meeting on April 24, 2019, please contact Ellen Devlin, Toronto and East York Community Council Administrator no later than 12:00 p.m. on April 23, 2019.

City's Residential Retrofit Program

Topic

  • Financial > Special charges for City's Residential Retrofit Program

Notice Date

2019-04-11

Notice of the imposition of special charges on benefitting properties under the City's Residential Retrofit Program.

Individual bills for each of the benefitting properties listed below have been submitted for the meeting of City Council being held on April 16 and 17, 2019. Review bill details here.

Each of these bills imposes a special charge on each of the corresponding benefitting properties as a result of the property having entered into a Property Owner Agreement with the City and having undertaken energy efficiency and/or water conservation works as local improvements under the Residential Retrofit Program authorized by Executive Committee Item EX33.22, as adopted by Council on July 16, 17, 18 and 19, 2013 and enacted in By-law 1105-2013 (July 19, 2013).

The benefitting properties are:

-        4 Jerome Street

-        6 Dukinfield Crescent

Renaming of Karen's Way extending between Barberry Place and Rean Drive - Thomas Clark Way

Topic

  • Transportation > Intention to name a road or highway

Notice Date

2019-04-10

Notice is given that the City of Toronto will consider whether to pass a by-law to authorize the renaming of a proposed public highway in the North York Community Council area.

To consider a proposal to rename the proposed public highway, Karen's Way, between Barberry Place and Rean Drive as "Thomas Clark Way".

The plan showing the lands to be affected may be seen in the City Clerk's Office, Secretariat, Ground Floor, North York Civic Centre, 5100 Yonge Street, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. At its meeting to be held in the Council Chamber, Lower Floor, North York Civic Centre, 5100 Yonge Street, on April 24, 2019, at 10:00 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the North York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

Notice to people writing or making presentations to the North York Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it – such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address – available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view.  If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast.  Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

To obtain additional information, submit comments or address the North York Community Council meeting on April 24, 2019, please contact the following City official no later than 4:30 p.m. on April 23, 2019.

Ms. Francine Adamo

Administrator, North York Community Council

City Clerk’s Office

North York Civic Centre

Main Floor, 5100 Yonge Street

Toronto, Ontario M2N 5V7

Telephone: 416-395-0480; Fax: 416-395-7337

E-mail: nycc@toronto.ca

Notice Date

2019-04-10

To consider a proposal to name an existing public lane located north of Airdrie Road, east of Bayview Avenue as “Edna Beange Lane".

The plan showing the lands to be affected may be seen in the City Clerk's Office, Secretariat, Ground Floor, North York Civic Centre, 5100 Yonge Street, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. At its meeting to be held in the Council Chamber, Lower Floor, North York Civic Centre, 5100 Yonge Street, on April 24, 2019, at 10:00 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the North York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

Notice to people writing or making presentations to the North York Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it – such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address – available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view.  If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast.  Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

To obtain additional information, submit comments or address the North York Community Council meeting on April 24, 2019, please contact the following City official no later than 4:30 p.m. on April 23, 2019.

Ms. Francine Adamo

Administrator, North York Community Council

City Clerk’s Office

North York Civic Centre

Main Floor, 5100 Yonge Street

Toronto, Ontario M2N 5V7

Telephone: 416-395-0480; Fax: 416-395-7337

E-mail: nycc@toronto.ca

Notice of Intention to Designate - 58 Wheatfield Road (Alfred Baker House)

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2019-04-08

Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 58 Wheatfield Road under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

Reasons for Designation:

The property at 58 Wheatfield Road is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.

Description:

Located in the area northeast of Lake Shore Boulevard West and Royal York Road in Mimico, the property at 58 Wheatfield Road contains a 2½-storey house form building (1908) designed in the Period Revival style with Arts and Crafts features that is attributed to Toronto architect Alfred Baker, who occupied the residence for nearly half a century.  The property was listed on the former City of Etobicoke Heritage Inventory prior to 1998, and its inclusion on the City of Toronto Inventory of Heritage Properties (now known as the Heritage Register) was confirmed in 2006.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value:

The property at 58 Wheatfield Road is valued for its design as an early 20th century house form building in the Period Revival style with features inspired by the Arts and Crafts movement, including the expansive L-shaped plan, the cladding, the extended roofline and detailing, the square bay window and, in some of the openings, the multi-paned windows.  Its design is attributed to architect Alfred Baker, the first owner and occupant of the property, who served as the chief draftsman and assistant to the notable architect S. Hamilton Townsend when the latter firm completed high-end residential projects in Rosedale.

The associative value of the Alfred Baker House is through its contribution to the residential development of Mimico in the early 20th century.  While Mimico originated as a late-18th century milling and farming community accessed by road and water, the area remained isolated until the arrival of the steam railway and the layout of a model town in the mid-1800s.  The introduction of a radial railway at the end of the 19th century improved connections with Toronto and promoted Mimico's steady development after 1900 as a police village, village and town.  During this era, former farmland was developed for both waterfront estates and residential subdivisions, the latter providing housing for workers in both Mimico and neighbouring New Toronto, as well as commuters to the city, including architect Alfred Baker. 

Contextually, the property at 58 Wheatfield Road has cultural heritage value through its support for the character of the neighbourhood northeast of Lake Shore Avenue West and Royal York Road where the collection of residential, ecclesiastical and educational buildings forms the historic core of the Mimico.  The Alfred Baker House is historically, visually and physically linked to its setting on Wheatfield Road where, with its vintage and appearance, it represents the initial development of the street after the turn of the 20th century.

Heritage Attributes:

The heritage attributes of the Alfred Baker House at 58 Wheatfield Road are:

-          The setback, placement and orientation of the building on the west side of the street, south of Hillside Avenue.

-          The scale, form and massing of the 2½-storey L-shaped plan, with the main body extending north and south and the short wing facing east toward Wheatfield Road.

-          The cross-gable roof with the extended eaves and the purlins on the wing facing the street.

-          The materials, with the stucco cladding and the wood and stone detailing.

-          The principal (east) elevation where, on the wing, the main entrance is placed in a moulded surround, protected by a wood canopy with pilasters and brackets, and flanked on the right (north) by a segmental-arched window opening.

-          On the east elevation of the main body, the single-storey four-part square bay window in the first (ground) floor.

-          The remaining fenestration, with the symmetrically-placed segmental-arched and flat-headed window openings on the east, north and south elevations of the main body and wing.

-          On the east elevation, the multi-paned windows in the openings in the second storey of the wing.

Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention Rosemary MacKenzie, Administrator, Etobicoke York Community Council, Etobicoke Civic Centre, Main floor, 399 The West Mall, Toronto, Ontario, M9C 2Y2, by 4.30 p.m. on or before May 8, 2019.

Notice of Naming a Public Lane - Filly Heights

Topic

  • Transportation > Intention to name a road or highway

Notice Date

2019-04-08

To consider a proposal to name the proposed private street at 50 Humberwood Boulevard as "Filly Heights".

The plan showing the lands to be affected may be seen in the City Clerk's Office, Secretariat, Etobicoke Civic Centre, 399 The West Mall, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. At its meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, Etobicoke Civic Centre, 399 The West Mall on April 24, 2019 at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Etobicoke York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

Notice to people writing or making presentations to the Etobicoke York Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it – such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address – available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view.  If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast.  Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

To obtain additional information, submit comments or address the Etobicoke York Community Council meeting on April 24, 2019, please contact the the Rosemary Mackenzie, Etobicoke York Community Council Administrator no later than 4:30 p.m. on April 23, 2019

Notice of Intention to Designate - 363-365, 367, 381 and 385-389 Yonge Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2019-04-02

Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 363-365, 367, 381 and 385-389 Yonge Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

363-365 Yonge Street - Richard S. Williams Block

Reasons for Designation

The property at 363-365 Yonge Street (Richard S. Williams Block) is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value. 

Description

Located on the east side of Yonge Street between Gould and Gerrard Streets, the Richard S. Williams Block (1890) is a four-storey commercial building. The property was included on the City of Toronto's Heritage Register in 1974.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

The Richard S. Williams Block has design value as a fine representative and rare example in Toronto of a late-nineteenth century Victorian commercial building eclectically designed in the Richardsonian Romanesque style with Moorish Revival details. The composition and detailing of the principal (west) elevation on Yonge Street, with its rusticated stone and red brick cladding combined with horseshoe arches, key and diaper patterns and decorative terracotta, display a high degree of artistic merit. In recognition of its architectural significance, the building was amongst some of the earliest included on the City of Toronto's Inventory of Heritage Properties (now known as the Heritage Register) in March 1974. 

The Richard S. Williams Block has historic value for its association with the architects, A. R. Denison and G. W. King. Concurrent with construction of the Richard S. Williams Block, the design partnership of Denison & King produced two other known similarly eclectic Victorian buildings in the city that, together, represent a rare collection blending eastern design influences with contemporary western revival architectural styles. These include the Comstock Building at Victoria and Lombard Streets and the Athenaeum Club on Church Street, both of which are designated properties under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

Situated on the east side of Yonge Street between Gould Street and Gerrard Street East, the Richard S. Williams Block has contextual value as it supports and maintains the late-nineteenth century commercial building character that defines much of the historic built form of downtown Yonge Street as it developed as Toronto's 'main street'.  As one of a number of heritage properties on both sides of this block of Yonge Street, the Richard S. Williams Block is physically, functionally, visually and historically linked to its surroundings. 

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the Richard S. Williams Block are:

-       The setback, placement and orientation of the building on the east side of Yonge Street between Gould Street and Gerrard Street East

-       The scale, form and massing of the four-storey commercial building built on a rectangular plan with a flat roof

-       The principal (west) elevation with its red brick, stone and terracotta cladding

-       The pressed metal cornice with its dentilled detailing at the roofline on the principal (west) elevation

-       The organization of openings and detailing on the principal (west) elevation, divided vertically into three identical bays

-       The pattern and decorative detailing of the wood window mullions in the fixed glass panes on the principal (west) elevation at the second floor

-       The red brick details including the decorative frieze in a (diamond) diaper pattern below the roofline, the raised horizontal string courses in the spandrels above the horseshoe arches at the fourth floor, the brick voussoirs of the horseshoe-arched openings and the three identical key pattern designs repeated in the spandrel areas between the third and fourth-floor openings

-       The stone details including the rusticated sandstone cladding of the four piers at the first floor level surmounted by their elaborately carved capitals, the four smooth capitals and rusticated lintel below the third floor, the smooth headers above the third-floor openings, the smooth sills and the imposts of the horseshoe arched openings at the fourth floor

The terracotta details including the dentilled cornice with four decorative lion heads below the third floor, the three decorative tile borders framing the third and fourth-floor window openings and their respective cornices.

367 Yonge Street - Reasons for Designation

The property at 367 Yonge Street is worthy of inclusion on the City of Toronto's Heritage Register and designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the categories of design, associative and contextual value. 

Description

The property at 367 Yonge Street contains a three-storey building with retail at the ground floor and residential above. The building was constructed by 1869 of solid brick construction with brick cladding (currently covered with stucco on the west elevation).  The property is located on the east side of Yonge Street between Gould Street and Gerrard Street East.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

The property at 367 Yonge Street has design value as a representative example of a mid-nineteenth century commercial and residential building that blends elements of the Georgian and Greek Revival styles. The principal (west) elevation's symmetrically-arranged, flat-headed openings with their segmental-arched headers surmounted by scroll corbels and stone sills below are further enlivened by a corbelled brick Greek key pattern frieze below the decorative wood-bracketed roofline.

The building has historic value as it is associated with the earliest development of this portion of Yonge Street in the mid-nineteenth century. Along with the two attached buildings directly north of the subject property, this three-storey group represents the tallest and earliest solid brick construction on this block of Yonge Street that otherwise contained only one or two-storey wood frame buildings before 1870.

Situated on the east side of Yonge Street, between Gould Street and Gerrard Street East and directly adjacent to the Richard S. Williams Block at 363-365 Yonge Street, the property at 367 Yonge Street has contextual value as it maintains the low-rise commercial and residential building character that defined the historic built form of the area in the second half of the nineteenth century. It is physically, functionally, visually and historically linked to its surroundings.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the property at 367 Yonge Street are:

-       The setback, placement and orientation of the building on the east side of Yonge Street between Gould Street and Gerrard Street East

-       The scale, form and massing of the three-storey commercial and residential building built on a rectangular plan with a pitched roof and brick chimney with its corbelled brick crown at the north end

-       The principal (west) elevation with its buff brick, stone and wood cladding

-       The bracketed wood fascia and soffit at the roofline and decorative corbelled brick frieze directly below

-       The symmetrical arrangement of flat-headed openings on the second and third floors of the principal (west) elevation

-       The stone detailing including the window sills and segmental-arched headers above the second and third floor openings with their scroll-shaped corbel brackets

-       On the principal (west) elevation, the pattern of divisions of windows with a transom light in the first floor window, and for the second and third floor windows, as shown in the original architect's drawings, the double-hung sash featuring two lights over one

Note: the stucco currently covering the brick cladding on the principal (west) elevation is not considered a heritage attribute

381 Yonge Street - Yonge Street Mission Building

Reasons for Designation

The property at 381 Yonge Street (Yonge Street Mission Building) is worthy of inclusion on the City of Toronto's Heritage Register and designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value. 

Description

The property at 381 Yonge Street contains the Yonge Street Mission, an institutional building located on the east side of Yonge Street south of Gerrard Street East. Originally constructed in 1904, the Yonge Street Mission is a two-storey structure with a pitched roof including five skylights along the ridgeline. The principal (west) elevation was completely rebuilt to the designs of Mathers & Haldenby, architects, in 1953.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

The Yonge Street Mission Building has design value as a fine representative of a low-rise, mid-twentieth century institutional building whose Stripped Classicism is indicative of the work of the prominent Toronto architectural firm, Mathers & Haldenby. The style defines a transitional moment in Toronto architecture immediately following WWII that was expressed as a blending of Neo-Classicism and Modernism. At the Yonge Street Mission Building, traditional limestone cladding and details maintain a classical monumentality on the principal (west) elevation while the strong verticality of the openings and their minimalist detailing harken toward Modernist curtain wall construction and its associated aesthetic.

The property at 381 Yonge Street has historic value for its association with the history of the Yonge Street Mission founded in 1896 and the organization's operation at the subject location since 1904 (then owned by the Hon. Samuel Hume Blake), providing charitable services and social programs to vulnerable residents in Toronto. Since 1979, the Mission's Evergreen Centre has focused these efforts on the needs of street youth.

The current building is valued for its association with the architectural firm of Mathers & Haldenby, who designed many prominent mid-century structures across the city including the iconic Imperial Oil Building at 111 St. Clair Avenue West, which is recognized on the City’s Heritage Register.

Situated on the east side of Yonge Street south of Gerrard Street East and abutting the corner property at 385-391 Yonge Street, the Yonge Street Mission has contextual value as it maintains the low-rise building character that defined the historic built form of the area from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth century.

The Yonge Street Mission is also valued as a long-time local landmark institution on Yonge Street, south of Gerrard. This charitable organization has provided assistance to Toronto's most vulnerable residents since its founding in 1896 and has operated continuously from 381 Yonge Street since 1904. The Yonge Street Mission is an important institution in the social history of the city that has been physically, functionally, visually and historically linked to its surroundings for the past 115 years.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the Yonge Street Mission Building are:

-       The setback, placement and orientation of the building on the east side of Yonge Street south of Gerrard Street East

-       The scale, form and massing of the two-storey building with its flat roof behind a gabled parapet on the principal (west) elevation and pitched roof with five skylights over the auditorium (which are part of the Yonge Street Mission building's earlier 1904 design by the architectural firm, G. M. Miller & Co. and appear in the original architectural drawings).

-       The principal (west) elevation with its Indiana limestone cladding

-       The bracketed wood soffit at the roofline on the principal (west) elevation

-       The arrangement of the fenestration on the upper floor of the principal (west) elevation with the three evenly-spaced rectangular openings with stone headers, surrounds and profiled mullions in a three-over-three-over-three pattern centrally and two-over-two-over-two near the north and south ends

-       The carvings in their centred position in the limestone entablature on the principal (west) elevation including the lighthouse emblem, architectural lettering reading "Yonge Street Mission" and two equal-sided crosses       

385-391 Yonge Street (including 3 Gerrard Street East) - Gerrard Building

Reasons for Designation

The Gerrard Building is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value. 

Description

Located on the southeast corner of Yonge Street and Gerrard Street East, the Gerrard Building (1924) is a three-storey commercial and office building.  The property was included on the City of Toronto's Heritage Register in 1990.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

The Gerrard Building has design value as a fine representative, and rare example along Yonge Street, of the Modern Gothic style adapted to a commercial building. It is distinguished by its contemporary updating of a historical style with its sleek sandstone cladding and tripartite division of window openings in a variation of the Chicago Style along with stylized octagonal piers and wall buttresses.

The Gerrard Building has historic value for its association with the prolific architects, Sproatt & Rolph, and is recognized amongst the numerous fine commercial buildings the firm designed in Toronto during the early-twentieth century including the Royal York Hotel on Front Street. The site is also associated with The Forum, a grand High Victorian commercial block that formerly anchored this corner and contributes to an understanding of the evolution of the intersection at Yonge and Gerrard Streets.

Situated prominently on the southeast corner of Yonge Street and Gerrard Street East the Gerrard Building has contextual value as it anchors and maintains the low-rise commercial building character that defined the historic built form of the area from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth century. With its position on a corner lot and grand presence, the Gerrard Building stands as a reminder of the grandeur of Yonge Street as it developed in the early twentieth century.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the Gerrard Building are:

-       The setback, placement and orientation of the building on the southeast corner of Yonge Street and Gerrard Street East

-       The scale, form and massing of the three-storey commercial and office building built on a rectangular plan with a flat roof

-       On the Yonge Street (west) and Gerrard Street East (north) elevations, the sandstone cladding with stone trim

-       On the Yonge Street (west) elevation, the location and stone detailing of the entry at the south end of the building

-       The organization of the flat-headed openings and their detailing on the Yonge Street (west) and Gerrard Street East (north) elevations, which are divided vertically into four bays and six bays, respectively

-       The arrangement of the fenestration in the upper floors on the west and north elevations including its tripartite division by secondary piers, and with the central opening containing

-       Above each window pane on the second and third floors of the west and north elevations, the transom lights (currently opaque spandrels) with their four-over-four arrangement (as seen in the original architectural drawings and 1950 archival photographs)

-       On the west and north elevations, the stone detailing including the octagonal piers with their faux compound piers and pointed finials at the first floor, and the decorative carved stone band surmounted by a continuous stone cornice directly above the third floor openings.3.

Notice of an objection to the proposed designations may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of April 2, 2019, which is May 2, 2019. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

Notice of Intention to Designate - 226 St. George Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2019-04-02

Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 226 St. George Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

Reasons for Designation

The property at 226 St. George Street is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.

Description

Located on the west side of St. George Street south of Bernard Avenue in The Annex neighbourhood, the George Gooderham Mitchell House (1903) is a 2.5-storey brick and stone house form building designed by the architect David Roberts Jr. for George Gooderham Mitchell and subsequently used as a vocational school by various groups affiliated with the Roman Catholic faith. The property was listed on the City of Toronto Inventory of Heritage Properties (now known as the Heritage Register) in July 1976.

Statement of Significance

The property at 226 St. George Street has cultural heritage value as a fine representative example of Queen Anne Revival styling applied to a large house form building in the first decade of the twentieth century. The style, identified by the variety of materials and decorative detailing, asymmetrical profile and complicated roof lines, represented the exuberant architecture of the late Victorian era. The George Gooderham Mitchell House is noteworthy for its attractive combination of forms, massing and stonework.

The George Gooderham Mitchell House is valued for its associations with a member of Toronto's prominent Gooderham family, which co-founded the famed Gooderham and Worts Distillery (now the Distillery District).  The property was developed and initially occupied by stockbroker George Gooderham Mitchell, grandson of George Gooderham.

The property at 226 St. George Street is also valued for its association with the architect David Roberts, Jr., who had extensive connections to the Gooderham family.  Roberts oversaw much of the work at the Gooderham and Worts Distillery (including the reconstruction of several buildings after the 1870 fire) and designed the landmark Gooderham Building at Wellington and Front Streets (completed in 1892 and known locally as the "Flat-Iron Building").  He also prepared plans for the residences of various Gooderham family members, with the grand George Gooderham House (dating to 1889-91 and currently the York Club) at the northeast corner of St. George and Bloor Streets being among his best known commissions.

Contextually, the property at 226 St. George Street has cultural heritage value for its visual and historical links to its setting in The Annex neighbourhood.  Its appearance reflects the late-nineteenth to early-twentieth century development of the area as one of the most sought-after residential enclaves in Toronto where the city's leading citizens occupied large-scale houses.  The George Gooderham Mitchell House is significant in context with the three additional large Edwardian homes directly to the north, and other surviving house form buildings along St. George Street that were originally owned by members of the Gooderham family and/or designed by prominent Toronto architects and recognized on the City’s Heritage Register.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the George Gooderham Mitchell House at 226 St. George Street are:

-  The setback, placement and orientation of the building on its lot on the west side of St. George Street south of Bernard Avenue

-  The scale, form and massing of the 2.5-storey plan above a raised basement

-  The materials, with the red brick cladding and the stone and wood detailing

-  The combination of hipped and gabled roofs including the oversized gable on the principal (east) elevation with its two symmetrically-arranged openings with double-hung sash windows, the gabled dormer windows and the brick chimneys, all on the north and south slopes

-  The deep profile of the eaves at the roofline on the principal (east) and north elevations and corner tower with the wood soffits, moulded fascia and decorative brackets 

-  The principal (east) elevation, which is organized into three bays plus 2.5-storey corner tower at the south end, a 2-storey bay window in the north bay and the centrally-positioned main entrance

-   The main entry located on the principal (east) elevation, which is elevated and protected by a flat-roofed porch with banded stone detailing on the columns and surmounted by a brick parapet

-   At the southeast corner, the 2.5-storey octagonal corner tower with its conical roof topped with a decorative metal finial

-   On the south side, the single-storey, rectangular, projecting bay with its arched parapet roofline and rectangular end walls

-   On the east, north and south sides, the fenestration with the stone detailing that incorporates broad flat-headed openings, double-hung sash windows, and a single fixed pane window in the central opening of the first-floor bay window at the north end of the principal (east) elevation

-   On the north and south sides, the round-arched openings and their round-arched stone headers in the gabled dormers

-   The decorative glass transom above each window opening at the first-floor level on the principal (east) elevation including on the corner tower

Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of April 2, 2019, which is May 2, 2019. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

Notice of Intention to Designate - 721 Eastern Avenue

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2019-04-02

Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 721 Eastern Avenue under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.                                     

The Canada Metal Company Ltd. (Hoyt Metal Company of Canada Ltd.)                           

Reasons for Designation

The property at 721 Eastern Avenue, containing the complex of industrial buildings originally known as the Hoyt Metal Company of Canada Ltd. and, from 1929 until 2004, as The Canada Metal Company Ltd., is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.   

Description

The property at 721 Eastern Avenue is located in Leslieville, on the south side of Eastern Avenue between Carlaw Avenue and Leslie Street, north of Lakeshore Boulevard and the former Gardiner Expressway which for 80 years contained the former industrial complex known as The Canada Metal Company Ltd. The first building constructed on the site in 1925-6 by the Hoyt Metal Company of Canada Ltd. was the Main Building (including Buildings A+B), located at the northwest corner of the property and built to the design of Wells & Gray Ltd., Engineers and Contractors.  Building A included upper level offices and a shipping warehouse below and Building B contained the factory.  From 1929 until 1980 the complex would undergo a continuous series of expansions, alterations and demolitions, primarily to the designs of Wells & Gray, in response to an evolving sequence of functions related to the production of metal alloys, until operations ceased.  One of these structures was the building known as Building G (1943) connecting the Main Building and Foundry Building (D, 1929). The proximity to the CNR railway to the south of the property meant that railway spurs were included in the property's evolution.  In 1930 Hoyt amalgamated with other metal companies and became known as The Canada Metal Co. Ltd which continued to own the property until 2004.  After that time the large industrial spaces accommodated Cinespace Film Studios until General Motors of Canada purchased the property in 2016. 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

The Canada Metal Company Ltd. property, including the original Hoyt Metal Company of Canada Ltd. Main Building, the office and warehouse building (Building A), located at the property at 721 Eastern Avenue, is a fine representative of the industrial building type which emerged in the 19th century and whose key characteristic was a plan based on a structural grid of columns providing maximum internal flexibility for the accommodation of factory machinery and the production and movement of products.  The structural grid is reflected on the building's principal (north) and side (west) elevations with their regular composition of brick piers flanking banks of windows.  The embellishment of the building's elevations, the sculptural relief of the brick wall surface between piers and stepped brick bands over the second-floor windows, the classical styling of the entrance with its brick piers, precast stone bases and entablature incised with the word "OFFICE," and the decorative panels above the entrance marked by precast stone squares, are typical of the early 20th century industrial buildings which frequently retained elements of the Classical style.

Building G, the connecting link between the Main Building (A + B) and the Foundry Building (D), is valued for its design which, in the light-weight appearance of its structural steel framing and the clerestory roof, constructed to maximize daylight for factory workers, is expressive of a functionally elegant 20th-century industrial building typology.

The property is valued for its association with the international Hoyt Metal Company, an important manufacturer and innovator of metal alloys in the early 20th century, which was based in the United Kingdom with branches in Australia, the U.S. A. and Canada. The Toronto branch was established in 1909 and managed by George F. Allen, an American inventor and patent-holder for inventions related to metal alloys.  The property is also associated with the Canada Metal Company Ltd.  In 1929, the Hoyt Metal Company of Canada merged with the Toronto-based Canada Metal Company Ltd. a nation-wide employer and manufacturer of metal alloy products, which started in the 1890s by William G. Harris in the backyard of his home on St. Patrick Street. The Canada Metal Co. continued to operate at the Eastern Avenue property from 1929 until 2004 and was an important employer in the neighbourhood.  The property has historic value for the information it yields regarding the growth of industry and how it contributed to the development of the working class neighbourhood between World Wars I and II.  The building is also valued as it demonstrates the work of the firm of Wells & Gray Ltd. Engineers and Contractors, who were well-known for their infrastructure projects in Ontario, extending from bridges to railway stations, their expertise in concrete construction, their leadership in the design of well-lit factories and their architectural design skills.

Contextually, the building is valued as it maintains and supports the early industrial character of the neighbourhood south of Leslieville on Eastern Avenue. With its carefully crafted elevations, Main Building (A) contributes to the sequence of finely designed, early to mid-twentieth century industrial buildings situated along Eastern Avenue.  Located with on the south side of Eastern Avenue since 1925, Building A is historically, visually and functionally linked to the residential neighbourhoods as well as the original industrial buildings and their subsequent adaptive re-use by the film industry. 

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the Hoyt Metal Co. Main Building (Building A) are:

-       The setback, placement and orientation of the building on its property on the south side of Eastern Avenue west of Leslie Street 

-       The scale, form and massing of the two-storey industrial warehouse-type building with a rectangular plan and flat roof

-       The organization of the elevations (now visible on the north and west sides) as a series of bays of equal width, demarcated by brick piers with windows in the bays between the piers

-       The cladding material which includes brick, with brick piers and decorative stepped details above the second floor windows, and precast stone, which is featured in the  entablature with the word "OFFICE" carved on its frieze, the precast stone capitals and bases of the piers flanking the entrance facing Eastern Avenue, the decorative pattern of precast stone blocks on the brick wall above the entrance and the concrete base which wraps around the building with protruding bases for the brick piers

-       The windows, which include steel factory sash at the ground floor and double-paned wood sash at the upper storey on the principle (north) and side (west) elevations and glass block on the upper floor of the east-side elevation

-       On the interior, the steel columns supported by concrete bases

-       A connecting building between the Hoyt Company Main Building (A + B) and the Foundry Building, (G) with its steel structure, including the columns, roof trusses and clerestory windows

Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of April 2, 2019, which is May 2, 2019. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

Notice of Decision - 33 Avenue Road

Topic

  • Heritage > Decision on alteration to a heritage property

Notice Date

2019-04-01

Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto on February 26, 2019, having considered an application to alter a structure designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for 33 Avenue Road, decided among other things, to

1.  Approve the alterations to the heritage property at 33 Avenue Road in accordance with Section 33 of the Ontario Heritage Act, to allow for the construction of a mixed use development on the lands municipally known as 33 - 45 Avenue Road and 140 - 148 Yorkville Avenue, with such alterations substantially in accordance with plans and drawings dated January 9, 2017, prepared by Richmond Architects and Zeidler Partnership Architects, and on file with the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services; and the Heritage Impact Assessment, final revision issued on June 27, 2018, and the Conservation Plan, issued on August 16, 2017,  prepared by ERA Architects Inc. and on file with the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, subject to the following additional conditions:

a.  related Site Specific Zoning By-Law Amendment giving rise to the proposed alterations shall be in full force and effect, in a form and with content acceptable to City Council, as determined by the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning, in consultation with the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services;

b.  prior to any Local Planning Appeal Tribunal Order issuing in connection with the appeal of the Zoning By-law Amendment Application (Case number PL150988) that the applicant:

1.  enter into a Heritage Easement Agreement with the City for the property at 33 Avenue Road substantially in accordance with plans and drawings prepared by Richmond Architects and Zeidler Partnership Architects, submitted with the Heritage Impact Assessment prepared by ERA Architects, Inc., dated June 27, 2018 or otherwise revised in accordance with a settlement offer or Local Planning Appeal Tribunal Order, subject to and in accordance with the approved Conservation Plan required in Part 1.b.2 below, all to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, including execution of such agreement to the satisfaction of the City Solicitor.

2.  provide a detailed Conservation Plan prepared by a qualified heritage consultant that is substantially in accordance with the conservation strategy set out in the Heritage Impact Assessment for 33 Avenue Road, dated June 27, 2018 and the Conservation Plan, issued on August 16, 2017, prepared by ERA Architects, Inc., or otherwise a conservation strategy revised in accordance with a settlement offer or Local Planning Appeal Tribunal Order, all to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

3.  enter into and register on the property at 33 Avenue Road one or more agreements with the City pursuant to Section 37 of the Planning Act, all to the satisfaction of the City Solicitor, the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning and the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services with such facilities, services and matters to be set forth in the related site specific Zoning By-law Amendment giving rise to the proposed alterations, including amongst other matters,  securing the preparation  and thereafter the implementation of a Heritage Lighting Plan, a Signage Plan, an Interpretation Plan and requiring a letter of credit to secure all work included in the approved Conservation Plan and approved Interpretation Plan, including provision for upwards indexing, all to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

c.  prior to Final Site Plan approval in connection with the Zoning By-law Amendment appeal for the property at 33 Avenue Road, the owner shall:

1.  provide final site plan drawings including drawings related to the approved Conservation Plan required in Part 1.b.2 above to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

2.  provide an Interpretation Plan for the subject properties, to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services and thereafter shall implement such Plan to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

3.  provide a Heritage Lighting Plan that describes how the heritage property will be sensitively illuminated to enhance its heritage character to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services and thereafter shall implement such Plan to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

4.  provide a detailed Landscape Plan for the subject property satisfactory to the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

5.  submit a Signage Plan for the proposed development to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

d.  prior to the issuance of any permit for all or any part of the property at 33 Avenue Road, including a heritage permit or a building permit, but excluding permits for repairs and maintenance and usual and minor works for the existing heritage buildings as are acceptable to the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, the owner shall:

1.  obtain final approval for the necessary by-law amendments required for the alterations to the property at 33 Avenue Road, such amendments to have been enacted by City Council in connection with a Local Planning Appeal Tribunal Order and to have come into effect in a form and with content acceptable to City Council as determined by the Director, Urban Design, City Planning, in consultation with the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

2.  provide building permit drawings, including notes and specifications for the conservation and protective measures keyed to the approved Conservation Plan required in Part 1.b.2 above, including a description of materials and finishes, to be prepared by the project architect and a qualified heritage consultant to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

3.  provide a Letter of Credit, including provision for upwards indexing in a form and amount and from a bank satisfactory to the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services to secure all work included in the approved Conservation Plan, Heritage Lighting Plan, Landscape Plan, and Interpretation Plan.

4.  provide full documentation of the existing heritage property at 33 Avenue Road, including two printed sets of archival quality 8” x 10” colour photographs with borders in a glossy or semi-gloss finish and one digital set on a CD in tiff format and 600 dpi resolution keyed to a location map, elevations and measured drawings, and copies of all existing interior floor plans and original drawings as may be available, to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

e.  prior to the release of the Letter of Credit required in Part 1.d.3. above, the owner shall:

1.  provide a letter of substantial completion prepared and signed by a qualified heritage consultant confirming that the required conservation work, required heritage lighting work, and the required interpretive work has been completed in accordance with the Conservation Plan, Lighting Plan, Landscape Plan, and Interpretation Plan and that an appropriate standard of conservation has been maintained, all to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

2.  provide replacement Heritage Easement Agreement photographs to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

Appeal to the Conservation Review Board:
The Ontario Heritage Act states that where a Council consents to an application to alter a designated property with certain terms or conditions, or refuses the application, the owner may, within thirty days after receipt of this notice, apply to the Council for a hearing before the Conservation Review Board.

The owner may request a hearing before the Conservation Review Board in this matter, by writing to the City Clerk:  Attention Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, by 4.30 p.m. on or before May 1, 2019.

Noise By-law Review – Proposed Amendments to Chapter 591, Noise

Topic

  • Licensing > Proposal to amend the Noise Chapter of the Municipal Code

Notice Date

2019-03-27

Toronto City Council will be considering recommendations to adopt amendments to Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 591, Noise, including amendments to Section 591-11. Offences.

It is proposed that the amendments to the By-law be adopted at the Council meeting to be held on April 16, 2019 or at a subsequent meeting.  If adopted by City Council, the proposed amendments to Section 591-11. Offences will:

1.  Increase the maximum fine to $100,000.

2.  Add a special fine in an amount equal to any economic gain obtained from non-compliance.

3.  Designate each offence as continuing offence with a maximum daily fine of $10,000 and a total fine which may exceed $100,000.

4.  Include offences for obstruction and failure to provide information as required.

5.  Include authority to enter to inspect, to make orders to comply and to take remedial action.

The proposed amendments are outlined in the report titled "Noise By-law Review - Proposed Amendments to Chapter 591, Noise".  To view or obtain a copy of the report, visit the City's website at: 

http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2019.EC3.6

At its meeting to be held in Committee Room 1, 2nd Floor, Toronto City Hall on Wednesday April 3, 2019, at 9:30 a.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, the Economic and Community Development Committee of Toronto City Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who wishes to speak to the matter.

To submit comments or make a presentation to the Economic and Community Development Committee on April 3, 2019, please contact the Committee no later than 12:00 p.m. on April 2, 2019:

Economic and Community Development Committee

Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

10th Floor, West Tower,

Toronto, ON  M5H 2N2

Telephone: 416-338-5089

Fax: 416-392-1879

Email: ecdc@toronto.ca

To ask questions regarding the content of the report, contact:

Carleton Grant

Director, Policy and Strategic Support

Municipal Licensing and Standards

Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

16th Floor, West Tower

Toronto, ON, M5H 2N2

Telephone: 416-338-5576
Email: Carleton.Grant@toronto.ca

Any comments received after the Committee meeting will be forwarded to Council.

While the staff report sets out proposed changes, the Committee and/or City Council may adopt additional or other amendments that differ from the recommendations set out in the report.  The proposed amendments are subject to the decision of the Economic and Community Development Committee and the decision of Toronto City Council.  

If this matter is postponed at the Committee meeting or Council meeting or considered at a subsequent Committee or Council meeting, no additional notice will be provided other than the information on the subsequent Committee or Council agenda.  Please contact the above City officials if you require notice in these cases.

The Economic and Community Development Committee will make its final recommendations on April 3, 2019 which will be forwarded to City Council on April 16, 2019.

Notice to people writing or making presentations to the Economic and Community Development Committee:  The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees.

The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it – such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address – available to the public.

Many Committee, Board and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view.  If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast.  Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

If you want to learn more about why and how the City collects your information, write to the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto ON M5H 2N2 or by calling 416-338-5089.

City's Residential Retrofit Program

Topic

  • Financial > Special charges for City's Residential Retrofit Program

Notice Date

2019-03-22

Notice of the imposition of special charges on benefitting properties under the City's Residential Retrofit Program.

Individual bills for each of the benefitting properties listed below have been submitted for the meeting of City Council being held on March 27 and 28, 2019. Weblinks for these bills can be found here.

Each of these bills imposes a special charge on each of the corresponding benefitting properties as a result of the property having entered into a Property Owner Agreement with the City and having undertaken energy efficiency and/or water conservation works as local improvements under the Residential Retrofit Program authorized by Executive Committee Item EX33.22, as adopted by Council on July 16, 17, 18 and 19, 2013 and enacted in By-law 1105-2013 (July 19, 2013).

The benefitting properties are:

 

7 Westcroft Drive 30 Mitchell Avenue 73 Spruce Hill Road 130 Riverdale Avenue
7 Wyandot Avenue 37 Robbins Avenue 74 Prince Charles Drive 221 Milner Avenue
13 Ashbury Avenue 45 Driftwood Avenue 78 Bradworthy Court 522 Main Street
15 Orton Park Road 53 Symington Avenue 92 Holcolm Road 1566-1574 Avenue Road
16 Olson Drive 54 Allenby Avenue 98 Waterton Road 1747 Dufferin Street
17 Simpson Avenue 59 Fuller Avenue 100 Silvio Avenue 3950 Lawrence Avenue East
22 Somerville Avenue 72 St Dunstan Drive 130 Presley Avenue  

 

Declaration of Multiple Surplus Properties

Topic

  • Sale of City Property/Real Estate > Proposed sale of City property

Notice Date

2019-03-21

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with the City of Toronto’s real estate disposal by-law, the following properties were declared surplus:

1.         On March 12, 2019, Delegated Approval Form Nos. 2013-212, 2013-214, 2013-215, 2013-220 and 2014-020 are amended to include Hydro One Networks Inc. and Canadian National Railway Company as transferees of portions of City roads to be transferred to Parks Canada for the development of the Rouge National Urban Park, conditional upon City Council approving the permanent closure of the roads.

2.         On March 14, 2019, Trafford Lane, legally described as Lane, Plan 5633 North York, designated as Part 4 on Plan 66R-28485, City of Toronto and shown as Part 2 on Sketch No. PS-2018-041.  The parcel has a total area of approximately 1,071.1 sq. m.  It is subject to the reservation by the City of easements for sewer and water main purposes.  The intended manner of disposal to be by way of a nominal sum conveyance to Toronto Community Housing Corporation , as part of the Lawrence Heights Revitalization Project.

3.         On March 14, 2019, Cather Crescent, legally described as Cather Crescent, Plan 5633 North York, designated as Part 2 on Plan 66R-28485, City of Toronto and shown as Part 1 on Sketch No.PS-2018-041, Part 2 on Sketch No. PS-2018-042 and Part 2 on Sketch No. PS-2018-043.  The parcels have a total area of approximately 9,798.6 sq. m.  It is subject to the reservation by the City of easements for sewer and water main purposes. The intended manner of disposal to be by way of a nominal sum conveyance to Toronto Community Housing Corporation,  as part of the Lawrence Heights Revitalization Project.

4.         On March 14, 2019, part of Varna Drive, legally described as part of Varna Drive, Plan 5633 North York, City of Toronto, being part of Part 1 on Plan 66R-28485, and shown as Part 1 on Sketch No. PS-2018-042 and Part 1 on Sketch No. PS-2018-043.  The parcels have a total area of approximately 3,750.1 sq. m.  It is subject to the reservation by the City of easements for sewer and water main purposes. The intended manner of disposal to be by way of a nominal sum conveyance to Toronto Community Housing Corporation, as part of the Lawrence Heights Revitalization Project.

The following City official has information about the proposed dispositions: Mrs. Kathie Capizzano, Tel: 416-392-4825, Fax: 416-392-1880, Metro Hall, 55 John Street, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario M5V 3C6. Enquiries may be made of the said official until the 3rd of April, 2019.

Notice of Intention to Designate - 49 Spadina Avenue

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2019-03-20

Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 49 Spadina Avenue under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

Steele Briggs Building:

Reasons for Designation

The property at 49 Spadina Avenue is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation, under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.

Description

The property at 49 Spadina Avenue is located on the northeast corner of Front Street West south of Clarence Square in the King-Spadina neighbourhood and contains a five-storey factory building that was constructed in 1911 according to the designs of the Toronto architectural firm of Sproatt and Rolph.  The Steele Briggs Seed Company commissioned the building, which it occupied it for over half a century.

The property at 49 Spadina Avenue was included on the inaugural City of Toronto Inventory of Heritage Properties (now known as the Heritage Register) in June 1973.  Council designated the King-Spadina Heritage Conservation District (HCD) under Part V of the Ontario Heritage Act by By-law 1111-2017, which was amended by By-law 1241-2017.  The King-Spadina HCD Plan (2016) identifies 49 Spadina Avenue as a contributing heritage property.  In 2018, the HCD was under appeal. 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

The property at 49 Spadina Avenue has design value as a well-crafted example of an early 20th century factory building in the King-Spadina neighbourhood, which was designed with features of Edwardian Classicism, the most popular style for most building types during this era.  The design of the Steele Briggs Building is particularly distinguished by the application of different yet complementary classical detailing on the south, west and north elevations that face Front Street West, Spadina Avenue and Clarence Square, respectively, including the repetition of the round arch motif.

The cultural heritage value of 49 Spadina Avenue is also through its contribution to the development and evolution of the King-Spadina neighbourhood in the early 20th century when the area changed from an institutional and residential enclave to Toronto’s new manufacturing district following the Great Fire of 1904.  The Steele Briggs Building replaced earlier house form buildings that outlined the south edge of Clarence Square and anchored the south end of the collection of industrial buildings extending north along Spadina Avenue from Front Street West.

The Steele Briggs Building is also valued for its historical association with the Toronto architects Sproatt and Rolph.  Headed by Henry Sproatt and Ernest Rolph, the partnership became amongst the leading architectural firms in Canada and is credited with introducing the influential Neo-Gothic as a national style with the commission for Hart House at the University of Toronto.  Often working in association with other celebrated Canadian architects, Sproatt and Rolph produced many of Toronto’s most notable buildings, including the Royal York Hotel (1929) and Canada Life's 1931 headquarters on University Avenue.  Sproatt and Rolph designed several factories and warehouses in King-Spadina, with the Steele Briggs Building remaining the most visually prominent with its setting overlooking Clarence Square.

Contextually, the value of the property at 49 Spadina Avenue is through its support for the historical character of the King-Spadina neighbourhood where it contributes to the important collection of former warehouses and factories that changed the area from its origins as an institutional and residential enclave to Toronto’s manufacturing sector after the Great Fire of 1904.  The Steele Briggs Building is historically, visually and physically linked to its setting at Front Street West and Spadina Avenue where it anchors this major intersection, overlooks the adjoining Clarence Square and forms the south edge of the industrial buildings that line Spadina Avenue and include the Gale Building (1904) at 24 Spadina and the Systems Building (1907) at 46 Spadina, which are recognized heritage properties on the opposite side of the street.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the Steele Briggs Building at 49 Spadina Avenue are:

-  The placement, setback and orientation of the building on the northeast corner of Front Street West and Spadina Avenue, south of Clarence Square

-  The scale, form and massing of the five-storey building above the raised base with the flat-headed window openings

-  The materials, with the red brick cladding and the brick, stone and wood detailing

-  The flat roofline with the brick parapets

-  The south, west and north elevations where the brick piers with the stone detailing organize the flat-headed door and window openings with the stone lintels and sills and the round-arched door openings with the brick voussoirs and stone keystones, including those originally designed for cargo doors

-  On the south elevation facing Front Street West, the round-arched door and window openings in each storey of the central bay

-  The west elevation on Spadina Avenue where four-storey frontispieces surmounted by cornices contain round-arched arcades of windows

There are no openings on the rear (east) elevation.  The low-rise east wing, which has been altered, is not identified as a heritage attribute.

Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of March 20, 2019, which is April 19, 2019. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

Notice of Intention to Designate - 15 Duncan Street and 158 Pearl Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2019-03-19

Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 15 Duncan Street and 158 Pearl Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

15 DUNCAN STREET 

Reasons for Designation

The property at 15 Duncan Street is worthy of  designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act or its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value. 

Description

The property at 15 Duncan Street is located on the northeast corner of Pearl Street, and contains a three-storey factory building that was constructed in 1903 according to the designs of the Toronto architectural firm of Gregg and Gregg.  The Canada Printing Ink Company commissioned the building, which it occupied for over half a century.

The property at 15 Duncan Street was included on the City of Toronto's Heritage Register in 2016.  In October 2017, Council designated the King-Spadina Heritage Conservation District (HCD) under Part V of the Ontario Heritage Act by By-law 1111-2017, which was amended by By-law 1241-2017.  In 2018, the HCD was under appeal.  The King-Spadina HCD Plan (2016) identifies 15 Duncan Street as a contributing heritage property.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

The property at 15 Duncan Street has design value as a well-crafted example of an early 20th century factory in the King-Spadina neighbourhood, which was designed with features of Edwardian Classicism, the most popular style for most building types during this era.  The design is distinguished by its symmetry and the classical embellishments that are identified with the style, and particularly by the arcades of round arches on the principal (west) and the south elevations on Duncan and Pearl streets, respectively.

The cultural heritage value of 15 Duncan is also through its half-century association with the Canada Printing Ink Company, which was internationally recognized for its development of inks for newspapers, magazines and other print media.  In its manufacturing complex in King-Spadina, the company produced specialty inks and developed new technologies, which included the Maxichrom System (the forerunner to the Mix-and-Match System of the 1970s) where any colour could be matched using 12 basic inks.

The Canada Printing Ink Building is valued for its contributions to the development and evolution of the King-Spadina neighbourhood in the early 20th century when the area changed from an institutional enclave adjoined by residential subdivisions to Toronto's new manufacturing district after the Great Fire of 1904.  The Canada Printing Ink Building was one of the first buildings completed on the former Upper Canada College lands following the redevelopment of the campus for industrial uses.

The historical value of the property at 15 Duncan Street is also through its connection with the Toronto architectural firm of Gregg and Gregg, which designed the Canada Printing Ink Building prior to the dissolution of the partnership.  While W. R. (William Rufus) Gregg and his younger brother, A. R. (Alfred Holden) Gregg led successful architectural practices alone and with other architects, during the period from 1893 to 1904 when they worked together the pair is credited with several factories in the King-Spadina neighbourhood, including the Eclipse Whitewear Building (1903) at King Street West and John Street, the White Swan Mills Building at 158 Pearl Street, and the subject building.

Contextually, the value of the property at 15 Duncan Street is through its support for the historical character of the King-Spadina neighbourhood where it is part of an important collection of former factories and warehouses that changed the area from its origins as an institutional and residential district to Toronto's manufacturing centre after the Great Fire of 1904.  The Canada Printing Ink Building is historically and visually linked to its setting where, with the adjoining White Swan Mills Building (1903) at 158 Pearl Street and the Southam Press Building (1908) at 19 Duncan Street, it is part of the surviving trio of early 20th century industrial buildings that anchor the northeast corner of Duncan and Pearl streets, south of Adelaide Street West.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the Canada Printing Ink Building at 15 Duncan Street are:

·         The placement, setback and orientation of the building on the northeast corner of Duncan and Pearl streets

·         The scale, form and massing of the three-storey building above the raised base with the window openings

·         The materials, with the red brick cladding and the brick stone and wood detailing

·         The roofline, with the extended eaves

·         The organization of the principal (west) elevation on Duncan Street into 10 bays and the south elevation along Pearl Street into seven bays

·         The classical arrangement of the principal (west) and south elevations, with the base, the two-storey arcades and, above the stone cornice, the attic

·         The fenestration, with the segmental-arched openings in the base, first and third stories (as well as the pair of diminutive openings above the west entrance), the round-arched openings in the second storey, and the brick and stone trim

·         The west entrance, which is placed in the fifth bay from the south end and has been altered

·         On the principal (west) elevation, the two northernmost bays that have been altered to reflect the design of the original building.

 

158 PEARL STREET

Reasons for Designation

The property at 158 Pearl Street (which includes the address at 154 Pearl Street) is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.

Description

The property at 158 Pearl Street is located on the north side of the street, east of Duncan Street, and contains a three-storey factory building that was constructed in 1903 according to the designs of the Toronto architectural firm of Gregg and Gregg.  The original occupant, White Swan Mills, producers of flour, cereals and spices, remained in this location for 25 years, followed by the stationery department of the Canadian Bank of Commerce (forerunner to today's Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, or CIBC) for over 30 years.

The property at 158 Pearl Street was included on the City of Toronto's Heritage Register in 2016.  In October 2017, Council designated the King-Spadina Heritage Conservation District (HCD) under Part V of the Ontario Heritage Act by By-law 1111-2017, which was amended by By-law 1241-2017.  In 2018, the HCD was under appeal.  The King-Spadina HCD Plan (2016) identifies 158 Pearl Street as a contributing heritage property.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

The property at 158 Pearl Street has design value as a well-crafted example of an early 20th century factory in the King-Spadina neighbourhood, which was designed with features of Edwardian Classicism, the most popular style for most building types during this era.  The design of the White Swan Mills Building is distinguished by its symmetry and the classical embellishments that are identified with the style, and particularly by the semi-arched pediments that mark either end of the principal (south) elevation.

The White Swan Mills Building is also valued for its contributions to the development and evolution of the King-Spadina neighbourhood in the early 20th century when the area changed from an institutional enclave adjoined by residential subdivisions to Toronto's new manufacturing district after the Great Fire of 1904.  The White Swan Mills Building was one of the first buildings completed on the former Upper Canada College lands following the redevelopment of the campus for industrial uses.

The historical value of the property at 158 Pearl Street is also through its connection with the Toronto architectural firm of Gregg and Gregg, which designed the White Swan Mills Building prior to the dissolution of the partnership.  While W. R. (William Rufus) Gregg and his younger brother, A. R. (Alfred Holden) Gregg led successful architectural practices alone and with other architects, during the period from 1893 to 1904 when they worked together the pair is credited with several factories in the King-Spadina neighbourhood, including the Eclipse Whitewear Building at King Street West and John Street, the Canada Printing Ink Building at 15 Duncan Street on the northeast corner of Pearl Street, and the subject building.

Contextually, the value of the property at 158 Pearl Street is through its support for the historical character of the King-Spadina neighbourhood where it is part of an important collection of former factories and warehouses that changed the area from its origins as an institutional and residential district to Toronto's manufacturing centre after the Great Fire of 1904.  The White Swan Mills Building is historically and visually linked to its setting where, with the adjoining Canada Print Ink Company Building (1903) at 15 Duncan Street and the Southam Press Building (1908) at 19 Duncan Street, it is part of the surviving trio of early 20th century industrial buildings that anchor the northeast corner of Duncan and Pearl streets, south of Adelaide Street West.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the White Swan Mills Building on the property at 158 Pearl Street are:

·         The placement, setback and orientation of the building on the north side of Pearl Street, east of Duncan Street

·         The scale, form and massing of the three-storey building above the raised base with the window openings

·         The materials, with the red brick cladding and the brick, stone and wood detailing

·         The roofline, which is anchored at the east and west ends of the principal (south) elevation by segmental-arched pediments

·         The organization of the principal (south) elevation into seven bays by brick pilasters that extend to a stone band course

·         Between the pilasters on the principal (south) elevation, the pairs of flat-headed window openings with stone lintels and sills

·         The principal (south) entrance, which is placed in the first (ground) floor in the westernmost bay in a round-arched surround (the entrance was relocated from the centre bay)

·         The east side elevation of the original building, which is viewed from Pearl Street and continues the cladding, fenestration and detailing from the principal (south) elevation

The rear (north) elevation has been altered.  The northeast addition, which was completed in the early 1980s, is not identified as a heritage attribute. 

Notice of an objection to the proposed designations may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of March 19, 2019, which is April 18, 2019. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

 

Notice of Naming of a Proposed Private Street - Samuel Wood Way

Topic

  • Transportation > Intention to name a road or highway

Notice Date

2019-03-08

To consider a proposal to name the proposed private street at 5365 Dundas Street West as "Samuel Wood Way"

The plan showing the lands to be affected may be seen in the City Clerk's Office, Secretariat, Etobicoke Civic Centre, 399 The West Mall, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. At its meeting to be held in the Council Chambers, Etobicoke Civic Centre, 399 The West Mall on March 19, 2019 at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Etobicoke York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

Notice to people writing or making presentations to the Etobicoke York Community Council: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its committees. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it – such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address – available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view.  If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast.  Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

To obtain additional information, submit comments or address the Etobicoke York Community Council meeting on March 19, 2019, please contact the following City official no later than 4:30 p.m. on March 18, 2019.

Ms. Rosemary MacKenzie

Administrator, Etobicoke York Community Council

City Clerk’s Office

Etobicoke Civic Centre

399 The West Mall

Toronto, Ontario M9C 2Y2

Telephone: 416-394-8101; Fax: 416-394-5600

E-mail: etcc@toronto.ca

 

Notice Date

2018-11-28

At its meeting in the Council Chamber, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, on December 5, 2018, City Council will consider Item CC1.1 which contains recommendations which may result in amendments to the Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 27, Council Procedures.

It is proposed that the by-law be adopted at the Council meeting to be held on December 5, 2018 or at a subsequent meeting.

If approved by City Council, the proposed amendments will:

1. Amend the Governance Structure of City Council's Committees, including related amendments on member appointment

2. Adopt new Community Council boundaries

While the report sets out proposed changes, City Council may make amendments that differ from the recommendations set out in the report.

Item CC1.1 - Recalibrating City Council's Governance System for 26 Members can be found on the City’s Website. For further information or to submit comments to City Council, please contact the City Council team at the email, phone or address listed below:

City Council

City Clerk’s Office

12 West, Toronto City Hall

100 Queen Street West

Toronto, ON M5H 2N2

Phone: 416-392-7032

Email: councilmeeting@toronto.ca

Notice to People Writing to City Council:

The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication to City Council or its committees. The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it – such as your postal address, telephone number or e-mail address – available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

If you want to learn more about why and how the City collects your information, write to the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto ON M5H 2N2 or by calling 416-392-7032.

Notice Date

2018-11-05

First Meeting of City Council – December 4, 5 and 13

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

First Meeting of City Council

2 p.m., Council Chamber

1.  to conduct ceremonial business and elect a Speaker and Deputy Speaker

2.  seating in the public gallery will be reserved for invited guests only

3.  additional unreserved seating will be available in Committee Room 1

4.  this session and all meetings of City Council will be streamed live at youtube.com/TorontoCityCouncilLive.

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

First Meeting continues

9:30 a.m., Council Chamber

1.  to consider a report from the City Manager and City Clerk on impacts of the reduction of the size of Council on governance structures and processes including the committee structure, community council boundaries, members appointments and amendments to the Council Procedures; and

2.  to introduce and enact bills

Thursday, December 13

First Meeting continues

9:30 a.m., Council Chamber

1.  to consider the report of the Striking Committee on Member appointments and the 2019 meeting schedule

2.  to consider urgent business from City Officials

3.  to consider Member motions

4.  to introduce and enact bills

The following additional meetings have also been scheduled:

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Community Councils

9:30 a.m., Toronto City Hall (meeting rooms to be announced)

1.  the community councils, yet to be formally established by City Council at its December 5 session, will meet to elect their chairs and vice chairs.

2.  no other business will be considered.

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Striking Committee

9:30 a.m., Committee Room 1

1.  to consider Member preferences for appointments to committees, local boards and other bodies; and

2.  to consider the 2019 schedule of meetings.

Agenda closings and distribution

The agenda closing and distribution dates for the first meeting are as follows:

December 5 session:

1.  agenda materials, including bills, due by Monday, November 26, 2018, at 4:30 p.m.

2.  agenda to be distributed on Wednesday, November 28, 2018

December 13 session:

1.  agenda materials, including officials’ reports, member motions and bills, due by Thursday, December 6, 2018, at 4:30 p.m.

2.  agenda materials to be distributed on Monday, December 10, 2018

Cancellations:

The following meetings, originally scheduled by City Council, are cancelled:

1.  December 5, 2018 – Striking Committee

2.  December 6, 2018 – Community Councils 

3.  December 7, 2018 – Executive Committee

To view the most up to date schedule of meetings, which incorporates the above, please visit www.toronto.ca/council

 

    Total Records Found: 23

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