Public Notice

Welcome to the City of Toronto's Public Notice website.

The City gives notice to the public on a variety of different matters, such as fees and charges, heritage designations, renaming of roads, and sale of property.

The City also gives notice through the newspaper, mail, or personal service, depending on legislation.

Current notices are listed below by date of posting. You can search for a current notice by word, phrase, topic, municipal ward, and/or date. You can also search past notices and access open data by clicking Search & Open Data.

Current Notices

Current Notices

Budget 2021 - Notice of Public Meeting - Proposed Changes to User Fees

Topic

  • Financial > Proposal to change user fees and charges
  • Licensing > Proposal to amend the Municipal Code

Notice Date

2021-01-14

Notice Date

2021-01-14

City's Residential Retrofit Program

Topic

  • Financial > Special charges for City's Residential Retrofit Program

Notice Date

2020-12-24

Notice of Intention to Designate - 41 and 47 Fraser Avenue and 135 Liberty Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice of Intention to Designate - 41 Spadina Road

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice of Intention to Designate - 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice of Intention to Designate - 100 Simcoe Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Amendment of Designating By-law - 197 King Street East

Topic

  • Heritage > Amendment to the designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice of Intention to Designate - 578 King Street West

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice of Passing of By-law 1144-2020 – 663-665 Huron Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice of Passing of By-law 1139-2020 - 41 Wabash Avenue

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice of Passing of By-law 1141-2020 - 191, 193, 195 and 197 Church Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Amendment of Designating By-law - 292 Main Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Amendment to the designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice of Intention to Designate – 1150 Eglinton Avenue East

Topic

  • Heritage > Designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice of Passing of By-law 1142-2020 - 305 (309, 311) King Street West

Topic

  • Heritage > Designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice of Passing of By-law 1143-2020 – 661 Huron Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-12-22

Notice Date

2020-12-22

2021 Rate Supported Budgets – Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2021 Solid Waste Rates and Fees

Topic

  • Licensing > Proposal to amend the Municipal Code
  • Licensing > Proposal to change user fees and charges

Notice Date

2020-11-06

Heritage Notices - June 29 and 30, 2020

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-08-07

Heritage Notices - February 26, 2020

Topic

  • Heritage > Decision on alteration to a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-08-07

    Total Records Found: 27

    Legend

    This extract of Notices is published for reference convenience. Only those Notices that have an address or location focus are listed. Please refer to the list of notices for complete list of current or archived notices.

    Mapped Notices

    City's Residential Retrofit Program

    more

    A By-law for the benefitting property listed below has been enacted for the meeting of City Council held on December 16, 17 and 18, 2020. Review By-law details.

     

    Each By-law imposes a special charge on each of the corresponding benefitting property as a result of the property having entered into a Property Owner Agreement with the City and having undertaken energy efficiency and/or water conservation works as local improvements under the Residential Retrofit Program authorized by Executive Committee Item EX33.22, as adopted by Council on July 16, 17, 18 and 19, 2013 and enacted in By-law 1105-2013 (July 19, 2013).

    The benefitting property is:

    ·         102 Bude Street

     

    • 102 Bude Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 41 and 47 Fraser Avenue and 135 Liberty Street

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 41 and 47 Fraser Avenue and 135 Liberty Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.                                                   

    Reasons for Designation

    The properties originally known as 41 Fraser Avenue, and now identified as three separate properties, 41 Fraser Avenue, 47 Fraser Avenue and 135 Liberty Street, are worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value, and meet Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.  The properties were listed as 41 Fraser Avenue on the City of Toronto's Heritage Inventory in 2005 and are located in Liberty Village which has been authorized for a Cultural Heritage Resource Assessment Study by City Council.

    Description

    The properties at 41 Fraser Avenue, 47 Fraser Avenue and 135 Liberty Street were originally known as 41 Fraser Avenue and also include the following entrance addresses at 39, 47a, 49, 49a, 53 and 53A Fraser Avenue, 38 and 42 Pardee Avenue.  They contain the former E. W. Gillett Co. Ltd. factory complex, constructed in 1911-12 with later additions in 1922 and 1941-2. The complex contains a collection buildings,

    1-4 stories in height with a five-storey corner tower, associated with industrial uses and featuring the Neo-Gothic and Streamlined Moderne styles.  The complex is located in the historic industrial Liberty Village neighbourhood, on the south side of Liberty Street between Fraser and Pardee avenues.

    The properties contain five buildings as follows:

    135 Liberty Street and 53/53A Fraser Avenue, a four-storey, L-shaped factory building with a corner tower and a sequence of wings along the southern extension, designed in 1911 by the American architect S. S. Beman in association with the Toronto-based firm of A. R. Denison & Stephenson and completed by 1912.  This building is part of the properties at 41 Fraser Avenue and 135 Liberty Street

    47 Fraser Avenue, a two-storey office complex with a projecting entrance portal, designed in 1911 by S. S. Beman in association with A. R. Denison & Stephenson and completed by 1912. 

    42 Pardee Avenue, a two-storey powerhouse building located at the south-west corner of Liberty Street and Pardee Avenue, designed in 1911 by S. S. Beman in association with A. R. Denison & Stephenson and completed by 1912. The powerhouse is part of the property known as 41 Fraser Avenue.

    49 Fraser Avenue, a three-storey employee welfare building located to the rear of 47 Fraser Avenue, designed by the architect William L. Symons, built in 1922 and extended with an additional fourth storey, designed by Earle L. Sheppard, architect, in 1938. This building is an entry address for the property at 41 Fraser Avenue.

    41 Fraser Avenue, a single-storey garage/storage building designed by the architect John M. Lyle and constructed in 1941-2. This building is part of the property at 41 Fraser Avenue and 39 Fraser Avenue is an entry address for that property.

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Located in the heart of Liberty Village, a significant industrial centre in Toronto which developed in the early 20th century, the properties known as 41 and 47 Fraser Avenue and 135 Liberty Street are significant as they contribute to the early 20th century industrial character of the neighbourhood and also contain an unusual industrial typology in both massing and stylistic detailing constructed for the E. W. Gillett Co. Ltd.

    The E. W. Gillett Co. Ltd. factory complex contains various structures which have design and physical value as finely crafted early-20th century industrial buildings which reflect the eclectic tastes of the period in their combination of both Neo-Gothic and Classical stylistic elements and one mid-20th century Streamlined Moderne building.  The buildings are rare in both their composition, style and program in the City of Toronto.  In the massing and distinct identity of functions the complex departs from the customary narrow rectangular factory building typical of late 19th and early 20th century factories, replacing the single volume with a cluster of buildings adapted to the site and expressive of the variety of functions associated with industry.  These include the a-typical L-shaped factory building at 135 Liberty Street and 53 Fraser Avenue, which includes a series of small notches on its north-south leg and features a prominent tower at its north-west corner. While the Neo-Gothic style was gaining prominence during the early 20th century, its application at this factory with the crenellations and the raised parapets at inner corner of the L and the west end of L were unusual features which combined with the tower, have made this factory a distinctive landmark amongst its neighbours. The classical elements are present in the brick striations of the first floor and in the keystones on the tower windows and the piers, panels and mouldings of the tower.

    The location of the offices in a separate building at 47 Fraser Avenue, was also unusual at this time and this structure features a single-storey portico with a crenellated roof, linked to the factory building at 135 Liberty Street by a bridge also with a crenellated roofline and brick striations on both stories providing visual continuity with the main building. The design of the two-storey powerhouse, at 42 Pardee Avenue, indicates its utilitarian function as the size and location of the windows, and the irregular rhythm of brick piers appears to have been determined by interior requirements related to structure and use. The current angled west wall at the north-west corner is the result of this portion of the building being reconstructed following the extension of a railway spur from the line on Liberty Street onto the property between the factory and the powerhouse.  The employee welfare building, known as 49 Fraser Avenue, was designed in 1922 to match the adjacent office building in its choice of brick and stone, window openings and originally also featured brick pediments above the projecting bays at the outer corners of the east and west facades.

    The single-storey garage/storage building at 41 Fraser Avenue is elegantly rendered in the Streamlined Moderne style with its striking minimalism, curving walls framing the deeply recessed garage entrance, horizontal brick banding, circular windows at the entrance and on the north elevation and minimally-detailed metal lighting fixtures.  Although a departure in architectural style from the rest of the complex representing the shifting tastes of the interwar years towards modernism, as well as the evolution of the work of John M. Lyle, this later addition is complementary to the earlier complex with its brick cladding of the same reddish tone, stone base and trim elements including the striated brick at the entrance.

    The former E. W. Gillett industrial complex has historic value as it yields information about the historical development of the Liberty Village neighbourhood from its earliest use as part of Fort York’s Garrison reserve with its later 19th-century institutional uses to its development, following the introduction of railways, as an important industrial centre in the early 1900s which contributed to Toronto's economic development and prosperity.

    The Gillett complex has value through its direct association with the E. W. Gillett Co. Ltd., which was established in Chicago in 1852 and manufactured baking supplies including Magic Baking Powder and Royal Yeast Cakes as well as Gillett's powdered lye and washing crystals, all of which were exported to the United Kingdom, Australia and South Africa.  The company opened its first Toronto branch on Front Street in 1886. Following the Great Fire of 1904, it relocated to premises at King and Duncan streets before moving, in 1912, to Liberty Village. In 1929 the company amalgamated with Standard Brands who continued to own the Fraser Avenue property until 1948 when it relocated to Dupont Street. The company's inclusion of an employee welfare building with a club, dining room adjacent sports fields in 1922 was an important step in providing for employee welfare which attracted the attention of the local press.

    The industrial complex has further associative value as it demonstrates the work of the American architect S. S. Beman, known for his town-planning and industrial design work for the famous Pullman railway car company, and that of the prolific, Toronto-based architectural partnership of A. R. Denison & Stephenson, and in particular, the firm’s leadership in the use of fire-resistant mill construction for factories following Toronto's Great Fire of 1904. With the 1941-2 garage-storage building the complex is also associated with John M. Lyle, who has been declared to be "one of Canada's outstanding architects of the first half of the twentieth century." [1]  Early in his career and with his foreign training and practice, Lyle was a great proponent of the Beaux Arts style and the City Beautiful Movement but through his work and writing, Lyle evolved, becoming a "a proto-modernist"[2] who embraced the Art Deco and Streamlined Modern styles in his later career.

    Located on the south side of Liberty Street, the principal traffic artery through Liberty Village, opposite the Lamport Stadium and fields, the complex of one-to-four storey brick clad buildings is important for maintaining the early 20th century industrial character of Liberty Village as it maintains the scale, material qualities and building typologies of an evolving factory complex. Built between 1911 and 1942, and having been a centre of manufacture, employment and enterprise for 110 years the complex is functionally, visually and historically linked to its surroundings.  With its prominent corner tower at the south-east corner of Liberty Street and Fraser Avenue and its distinctive roofline crenellations, the complex is a landmark within Liberty Village.

    Heritage Attributes

    The heritage attributes of the properties, formerly known as 41 Fraser Avenue and now also known as 47 Fraser Avenue and 135 Liberty Street which include the various buildings as outlined below, are:

    -   The setback, placement and orientation of the building complex on the properties on the south side of Liberty Street between Fraser Avenue and Pardee Avenue as this retains the relationship of the complex to its surroundings and the functional arrangement of its various building components which are part of its history and cultural heritage value

    135 Liberty Street - 53 Fraser Avenue: Factory

    The heritage attributes of the factory building on the south side of Liberty Street between Fraser and Pardee avenues are:

    -   The scale, form and massing of the building, which represent its unusual factory design, and include a four-storey, L-shaped block with an angled corner at the north-east corner and notched upper stories along the east leg, and the tower at the north-west corner with the raised parapet at the crux of the L and at the south end of the east leg of the L 

    -   The materials and their application which unify the complex and are characteristic of industrial buildings of the early 20th century include brick and stone. 

    Stone is present in the high building base, covered with concrete, the stone sills which extend into string courses and other decorative stone elements including the keystones in the window heads on the west elevation, the stone trim on the tower and, originally, the stone coping on the crenellated parapet. 

    Brick, which is laid in a Common Bond is the principal cladding of the structure and provides detailed elements including the striations of the first floor on the west and north facades, the soldier courses above the flat-headed window openings and in the decorative bands, the relief panels on the parapet and the elaborate detailing of the tower with its multiple pilasters of varying heights and relief panels.  The brick detail demonstrates the high level of design as well craftsmanship that makes this an impressive industrial building and a contributor to the Liberty Village neighbourhood. Yellow brick is used to clad the inner side walls of the series of small notched bays on the north-south leg of the L and its use here is typical of the period when it was often employed on less important walls of a structure.

    -   The design and arrangement of the window openings, which originally contained double-hung sash with multiple panes, is another means by which the physical value of the building is established as their variety adds to the richness of the design of the facades.  These various types include the single, segmental-arched and flat-headed window openings of the tower, the flat-headed, single windows clustered in pairs at the fourth floor, and the mix of paired sash in a double-wide opening, and the former "Chicago" windows now with three panes in a triple-wide opening.

    -   The door opening at the base of the brick tower and its stone surround which was a primary entrance to the complex, separate from loading bays and providing access to the stairs.

    47 Fraser Avenue - Head Office - Administration Building

    The heritage attributes of the head office building are:

    -   The scale, form and massing of two-storey building on a raised basement with a notched north-west corner, projecting entry portico and second-storey bridge connecting to the factory at 135 Liberty Street as they contribute to the unusual composition of the facility and represent the building's function as the administrative component of the complex and its integral functional and physical connection to that complex

    -   The materials include brick cladding, in common bond, with its striations, panel details and brick soldier courses, the stone base covered in concrete with stone details on the entrance porch and visually link the head office to the rest of complex, contributing to the design value through their carefully crafted details and application.

    -   Design value is evident in the arrangement of the principal (west) façade with its recessed, north-west corner adjacent to the main block with its classical composition of two, slightly projecting outer bays with single windows flanking the central section with its three pairs of single windows at all three storeys. The projecting entry porch with its crenellated roof line, shield, buttressed pilasters and segmental headed re-establishes the Neo-Gothic style. The south (side) elevation repeats this composition through the projecting end bays flanking a central bay, here, due to the shorter length of the façade, two single and two half windows mirrored about the central line in a classical manner.  The east (rear) elevation with its pairs of windows flanked by two outer bays of solid brick and the north (side) elevation repeat the pattern of window types and arrangement of the west and south elevations.  The east elevation does not have projecting outer bays.

    -   The design of the bridge with its crenellated roofline, triplet window openings and arched underside complement the design of the office and factory buildings that it connects on either side.

    42 Pardee Avenue - Powerhouse Building

    The heritage attributes of the Powerhouse building are:

    -   The scale, form and massing of the two-storey, flat-roofed building, rectangular in plan except for the angled west wall at the north-west corner an alteration that was made to accommodate the railway siding

    -   The brick cladding in English bond which ties the building to the rest of the factory complex

    -   The door openings and window openings which are single and double-height with segmental-arched heads with three brick courses and stone window sills.  The double-height windows feature triple-hung sash with multiple small panes. 

    -   The brick pilasters which flank the double-height windows on the west wall and the corbelled bricks at the north and south end walls

    49 Fraser Avenue - Employee Welfare Building

    The heritage attributes of building are:

    -   The scale, form and massing of the flat-roofed four-storey building constructed on a rectangular plan and connected at the north east corner to the factory building whose design and façade arrangement is compatible with the administration building and originally also featured paired pediments at the outer corners which emphasized the bi-lateral symmetry expressed in the slightly projecting outer bays of the west elevation

    -   The brick cladding, laid in a common bond pattern, and raised stone base clad in concrete and the soldier courses which act as continuous sting courses and lintels for the window openings and the notched layering of brick at the outer corners of the west elevation

    -   The windows are flat-headed with stone sills and their arrangement on the west elevation corresponds to the administration building with its paired opening in the outer bays and single openings in between further emphasizing the bi-lateral symmetry of the west elevations. The triple-width windows of the fourth floor openings are indicative of the addition in 1938.  On the shorter south elevations, the windows are singles grouped in pairs or singles. The variation in the windows with single, double and triple widths corresponds to the window pattern of both the administration building and the factory building.

    41 Fraser Avenue Adelaide Street West - Garage and Storage Building

    The heritage attributes of the former garage and storage building are:

    -   The scale, form and massing of the one storey building with a deeply recessed entry with curved walls on its principal west elevation which are linked to and representative of the building's original function as a garage/storage building for the factory complex

    -   The brick cladding which matches that of the original factory complex and which, with its recessed bands at the curved corners and in its common bond pattern, aligning with the recessed brick bands, contributes to the horizontal elements of the building's design

    -   The stone base of the building which ties in with the base of the original factory but whose shallowness corresponds to the low-rise and horizontal linearity of this garage/storage building

    -   The projecting light coloured band which marks the edge of the ceiling of the recessed entry and continues as a lintel over the two flanking windows, and with the stone sills, extends past the outer edges of the windows framing the end of the brick striations and emphasizing the horizontality of the façade which is characteristic of the Streamlined Moderne style

    -   The wide window opening flanking the recessed entry on the west elevation which contribute to the horizontality and with the adjacent expanse of unrelieved wall surface, the minimal quality of the building.  These windows feature Chicago-type elements their wider central bay and two adjacent side bays with opening sections.  The windows feature original metal factory-sash glazing

    -   The windows on the north elevation with a combination of various types including the broad Chicago-type, narrower windows and those adjacent to a doorway which feature factory-sash glazing with opening sections and have stone sills and a continuous stone lintel reinforcing the horizontal emphasis

    -   The windows on the east and south elevations, with their consistent sill and head height, marked by stone lintels continuing as horizontal bands and stone sills, their factory sash glazing in single or Chicago-window type openings

    -   The large circular window opening on the north elevation and the south facing wall of the recessed entry which are expressive of the Streamlined Moderne's preference for geometric forms and have metal factory-sash glazing with a central opening section

    -   The semi-cylindrical light fittings on the north, west and south facades which with their linear copper frames are characteristic of the Streamlined Moderne style

    -   The two recessed circular light fittings in the ceiling of the entrance with their three thin bands.

    Notice of an objection to the notice of intention to designate the property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of December 22, 2020, which is January 21, 2021. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.


    [1] Richards, p. 49
    [2] Kalman, p. 869.

    • 41 Fraser Avenue Toronto Ontario
    • 47 Fraser Avenue Toronto Ontario
    • 135 Liberty Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 41 Spadina Road

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 41 Spadina Road under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.                                              

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 41 Spadina Road, including the entry address of 45 Spadina Road, and known as Spadina Gardens, is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value

    Description

    The property at 41 Spadina Road contains the Spadina Garden Apartments, a four-and-half-story apartment building located on the south-east corner of Spadina Road and Lowther Avenue.  Constructed in 1905-6, to the designs of the architect Arthur R. Denison, the red-brick clad building, with stone trim, is a fine example of Edwardian Classicism noteworthy as one of the earliest apartment buildings in Toronto.  Spadina Gardens was listed on the City of Toronto's Heritage Register in 1979. Located in the Annex neighbourhood, the property is included within the boundary of the West Annex Phase 2 study area authorized by City Council in 2018 and is west of the West Annex Phase 1 (Madison Avenue) Heritage Conservation District.

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Constructed in 1905-6, Spadina Gardens has design and physical value as it is one of the two, known, surviving representatives of the earliest Toronto apartment buildings, which were a new housing type in the city c1900 and reflective of social change and urban growth at this period. The early apartment buildings drew on established precedents in Europe, New York, Chicago, Buffalo and Montreal.  The layout of the apartments at Spadina Gardens indicated it as a fair alternative to the adjacent Annex detached and semi-detached houses.  The apartment layout was similar as it included a generous square entry hall opening to the public rooms which had enhanced flexibility and spatial flow through the use of pairs of glazed pocket doors between the main public rooms. It also provided discreet separation of public and private spaces akin to a house and unlike many contemporary apartment buildings. Early examples of the type, like Spadina Gardens, were built in proximity to the downtown on major streets in residential neighbourhoods, where their low-rise massing and complimentary architectural styles and material allowed them to increase density and provide alternative, affordable, rental housing options to the detached house. 

    Spadina Gardens has further design and physical value as an exceptionally finely designed and detailed example of an apartment house in the Edwardian Classical Style.  The style is represented in the symmetrical design of the elevations, featuring bay windows and balconies supported on robustly carved corbels with wrought iron balustrades, the stone surrounds of the two principal entrances with their elliptical transom lights, complimented by the pairs of oval windows above and the prominent cornice with its decorative bands and dentil course. A high degree of craftsmanship is evident in the choice of cladding material and its detailing, including the red brick and purple brick employed in the rusticated base of banded bricks, the quoins at the corners, and keystones in the oval windows in combination with Roman stone belt course, sills and lintels and rough-cut stone cladding for the raised basement is further evidence of careful detailing and craftsmanship employed to convey the Edwardian Classical style.  A high degree of artistic merit is evident in the architect's layouts for the apartments with their flow of space in the public rooms, the careful separation of public and private spaces. The layouts convey the comfort of a house-form building and its associated types of space including a generous entry hall and the provision of natural light throughout.  Their success is evident in the fact that they have remained intact for more than 100 years and continue to function as originally designed.

    The property has historical and associative value as it represents the introduction of a new housing typology to the City of Toronto c. 1900 that would address a gap in the housing market in its provision of rental housing for a wide-range of residents not easily accommodated in the predominant typology of the single-family detached house. With origins in the European mansion block, the new apartment buildings were constructed in proximity to residential neighbourhoods, and offered a housing option appropriate to the needs and incomes of spinsters, widows and bachelors, young couples, retired couples and families, enabling them, at various stages of life, to stay within their neighbourhoods. Along with Sussex Court, completed in 1904, and also developed by the brothers Alfred and James Hawes with designs by the architect A. R. Denison, Spadina Gardens is one of the two earliest known surviving examples of an apartment building in Toronto. 

    The property also has value for its associations with many important Toronto residents including Sir Henry Pellatt, Lady Pellatt, and Lionel Massey.  The property was also the home for numerous individuals associated with Canadian arts, including Dorothy Stevens, painter and printmaker, Lois Marshall opera soprano, Samuel Hersenhoren, violinist and conductor on stage and radio, Maureen Forester, opera star, the musicians Irene and Bird Bailey, Maureen Whihak, designer for film, theatre and television, Ken Gass, founder, Factory Theatre, George F. Walker, script-writer, Member of the Order of Canada and Governor General medal award winner, Jacob Richler, author and journalist and David Young, author and founder of the Writer's Trust of Canada.

    Spadina Gardens was designed by Arthur Richard Denison (1857-1923) a prolific Toronto architect who designed many buildings in the city and across Ontario including churches, institutions, residential buildings and social facilities and who specialized throughout his career in warehouses and mills and fireproof construction.  Denison is further significant for his design of two of Toronto's earliest surviving apartment buildings, Sussex Court and Spadina Gardens.

    Located on the south-east corner of Spadina Road and Lowther Avenue, the property containing the Spadina Gardens Apartments has contextual value as its Edwardian grandeur, displayed in its brick and stone details, four-storey massing located in a landscaped and treed setting, maintains and supports the late 19th and early 20th-century residential character of the Annex neighbourhood.

    As a new residential building type representing social change, the growth of the city and increased densification, Spadina Gardens has further contextual value as it reflects this 20th-century evolution along Spadina Road, one of the city's main thoroughfares, as well as in the surrounding Annex neighbourhood. This evolution would include other 3-4 storey walk ups, the mid-rise apartment towers of the post-war era, as at 59 Spadina Road to the north, high-rise slabs, such as the 1966, sculptural Vincennes apartments by Uno Prii, to the west at Lowther Avenue and Walmer Road, and the later more urbanistically-conscientious blocks, like that at 50 Spadina Road, on the north-west corner opposite Spadina Gardens, which reclaims its scale and role of providing an urban street wall with its brick base of town houses. 

    For over 100 years, Spadina Gardens has been a landmark within the Annex neighbourhood. First prominent as an innovative building type associated with the major cities of Europe and the United States, its finely detailed architecture and massing, combined with its history of renowned residents have made it a well-loved focal point within the local community, as well as a well-regarded model of historic, architecturally fine, low-rise rental housing in the City of Toronto.

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    The following heritage attributes contribute to the value of Spadina Gardens at 41 Spadina Road as a representative of the first apartment buildings constructed in Toronto c 1900:

    -   The setback, placement and orientation of the apartment building at the south-east corner of Spadina Road and Lowther Avenue with its principal, west elevation facing Spadina Road, and its secondary, side and north elevation, facing Lowther Avenue surrounded on these two elevations with a landscaped setting including lawns, trees and shrubs

    -   The scale, form and massing of the four-storey building, on a raised basement with a flat roof, as it is planned as a pair of contiguous T-shapes, with the top of the 'Ts' providing a formal face to Spadina Road and the legs of the 'Ts' having sufficient space on either side to allow generous provision of daylight to the rooms facing the rear of the property

    -   The composition of the principal, west elevation facing Spadina Road which indicates its function as an apartment building with its two main entrances which provide access to a pair of apartments on each floor.  The entrances, flanked to either side by a long narrow window and a bay window are indicative of different hierarchies of space on the inside.

    -   The composition of the north, side, elevation facing Lowther Avenue which with its repeated windows from floor to floor and its inclusion of bay windows indicating the spaces containing the more important spaces of dining room and two principal bedrooms in contrast to the plain narrow windows for the kitchen and small bedroom

    -   The chimneys which are indicative of the inclusion of fireplaces within the grand public rooms of the apartments

    -   The interior floor plans of the apartments which in their layout of generously sized rooms and formality which includes a large square entry hall off of which open the public rooms including the parlor, dining room and den, as identified on the original 1905 architect's plans, with a door opening to a corridor leading to the private section of the apartment, including the kitchen, bedrooms and bathrooms, and the rear service door

    -   The interior features of the common entry and circulation areas including the internal vestibule double doors of oak with the patterned transom light with green stained glass, the main staircases constructed of steel with a cast-iron balustrade with cherry wood handrail and the skylights, and the rear service staircases characterized by their wood stairs, handrails and exposed brick walls

    -   The interior features of Apartment 10, as representative of the original apartment unit design, including the fireplace in the salon, the two pairs of pocket doors, between the living room and dining room and the hall and dining room and the arrangement of closets to create an axial niche in the dining room

    The following heritage attributes contribute to the design and physical value of the property at 41 Spadina Road as a finely composed and crafted representative of the Edwardian Classical style:

    -   The composition and design of the principal, west elevation facing Spadina Road which is based upon classical principles of symmetry with the two entry bays stepping forward in plan and including, at the ground floor level, the main entry doors flanked by a long narrow windows, and at the upper floors, a pair of oval windows flanked by the long narrow windows opening onto projecting balconies supported on dramatically moulded and projecting corbel brackets with iron filigree railings which provide further emphasis to the central entry bay. To either side of the two entry bays are bay windows with three double hung sash, which terminate at the fourth floor level in a small projecting cornice

    -   The composition and design of the side, north elevation facing Lowther Avenue with extended the variety of massing and window types of the principal elevation with a combination of bay windows, long narrow windows and paired narrow windows

    -   The combination of red and 'purple' brick cladding with stone trim as per the architect A. R. Denison's specifications

    -   On the principal, west, and side, north, elevations, the 'purple' brick banding at the extending from the ground floor to the first floor sills, which provides a classical base to the upper stories, the brick quoins on the central entry bays and outer corners of the apartment building

    -   The stone door frames with their stone quoins, carved reliefs of dragons on the impost blocks and acanthus leaf scrolls on the keystones set in the elliptical headed openings complimenting the oval windows above

    -   The oval windows with their projecting brick keystones

    -   The rusticated stone cladding of the raised basement storey

    -   The stone trim found in the belt course between the basement and first floor and the first and second floor, the stone sills and lintels of the windows

    -   The curved front steps with their metal handrails terminating in spiral newel posts

    -   The entablature and cornice with its string course, dental course and projecting cornice

    -   At the two main entrances, the paired entry doors with 'S' and 'G' etched on the doors with transom light above with etched glass pattern and the numbers '41' and '45'

    -   The double-hung, single-pane, sash windows and the casement windows with leaded glass transoms in the dining rooms facing the courtyard

    The following heritage attributes contribute to the contextual value of the property at 41 Spadina Road as it supports the predominantly late Victorian and Edwardian character of the Annex neighbourhood and the present-day character of Spadina Road as it is defined by a diverse collection of turn-of-the-century houses and later mid-twentieth century and contemporary multi-unit residential buildings.

    -   The four-and-a-half storey scale, massing and symmetrical composition of the multi-unit residential walk-up apartment building

    -   The combination of red brick with a variety of details represented in brick relief and stone trim

    -   The landscaped setting with mature trees, lawns and shrubs

    Note: the basement level areas are not included as a heritage attribute

    Notice of an objection to the notice of intention to designate the property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of December 22, 2020, which is January 21, 2021. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

    • 41 Spadina Road Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.                                                   

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three criteria of design and physical, historical and associative, and contextual values.

    Description

    Located east of Yonge Street and occupying the city block bounded by Lake Shore Boulevard East (north) and Queen’s Quay East (south) between Cooper and Freeland streets, the property at 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East (including entrance addresses at 33, 43, and 53 Freeland Street and 2 Cooper Street) contains a combined commercial and industrial complex that was commissioned by the Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO) and completed in 1954 according to the plans of the Toronto architectural partnership of Mathers and Haldenby. The LCBO complex consists of the four-storey Office Building facing Lake Shore Boulevard East that is linked by an overhead pedestrian bridge and a ground-level truck-loading bay to the three-storey Warehouse to the south. At the southwest corner of the property, the detached single-storey building was designed as a garage, repurposed in 1958 for a retail store (replacing the outlet that was originally located inside the office building), and subsequently modified. The property at 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East was listed on the City of Toronto’s Inventory of Heritage Properties (now known as the Heritage Register) in 2005. In 2016, the provincial heritage site was sold by the Government of Ontario.

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Design or Physical Value

    The property 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East has cultural heritage value as a rare example of a combined provincial headquarters commercial and industrial complex.           It was purpose-built for the LCBO and is comprised of a four-storey, rectangular-shaped, Office Building and a three-storey, rectangular-shaped, Warehouse. The components of the site are linked through a third-storey overhead copper-clad pedestrian bridge, which connects the south wall of the Office Building to the north wall of the Warehouse, and a ground-level truck-loading bay.

    The property at 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East has value as a representative example of the Modern style. Expressions of this architectural style can be seen in the shared construction materials of both buildings, including concrete, buff brick cladding and brick, stone, and metal detailing, and in the fenestration, the use of symmetry, and the detailing in their entrances.

    The property at 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East has cultural heritage value for displaying a high degree of craftsmanship through its functional organization of the individual buildings that are linked through their designs and materials and are physically linked through a pedestrian bridge, with copper cladding and flat-headed openings, and a ground-level truck-loading bay. They are also distinguished individually by their scale, fenestration, and detailing.

    Historical or Associative Value

    The LCBO Complex is valued for its association with the acclaimed Toronto architectural partnership of Mathers and Haldenby, which prepared the plans for the complex in 1950. Headed by Alvan Sherlock Mathers (1895-1965) and Eric Wilson Haldenby (1893-1971) and following its formation in the 1920s, the firm was recognized for the wide range of projects it executed, including its contributions to the University of Toronto's St George campus and the industrial complexes for Coca-Cola Limited across Canada. The commission for the LCBO's headquarters in Toronto was followed by Mathers and Haldenby's combined office and warehouse facility (1961) for Christie Brown and Company in Etobicoke.

    The property at 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East also has historical and associative value through its association with the Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO), the provincially

    -owned agency that, with the Liquor License Board of Ontario (LLBO), commissioned the complex. In operation since 1927, the LCBO consolidated its activities in this location with its office headquarters and the massive warehouse that included facilities for the distilling, bottling, and storage of its own brand of liquor. As the largest purchaser of liquor and spirits in the world, the LCBO oversaw its retail and distribution system across the province from this complex at 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East.

    The associative value of the property at 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East is also through its contribution to the transformation of Toronto's harbour and waterfront after World War II. Prior to this, in the early-20th century, the harbour and waterfront had been extended and modernized with dredging, lakefill, breakwaters, permanent dock walls, and slips that provided multiple points of access for water, rail and road transportation. The section east of Yonge Street was prepared for the impending opening of the St Lawrence Seaway (1959) where large tracts of land were acquired for commercial and manufacturing facilities, including the marine terminals on the Queen Elizabeth Docks (no longer extant) and the LCBO Complex Quay East, which led to the post-war revitalization of Toronto’s harbour and waterfront.

    Contextual Value

    Contextually, the LCBO Complex supports and maintains the historic character of Toronto’s central harbour and waterfront as it was expanded and modernized in the 20th century. Anchored on the east end by the extant silo of the Victory Soya Mills (completed 1948), this section of the harbour and waterfront east of Yonge Street is associated with the large-scale facilities that marked its post-World War II development and the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway. The LCBO Complex is an important surviving reminder of the ongoing transformation of the central harbour and waterfront during this era.

    The LCBO Complex is historically, visually, functionally, and physically linked to its setting where it occupies the entire block bounded by Lake Shore Boulevard East, Queen’s Quay East, and Cooper and Freeland streets and was situated to access the water, rail and road links along Toronto’s central harbour and waterfront.

    The relationship of the property to its setting is demonstrated by the placement, setback and orientation of the Office Building and Warehouse, which are situated on the south side of Lake Shore Boulevard East between Cooper and Freeland streets where they are connected to one another by an overhead pedestrian bridge and a ground-level truck-loading bay. In this location, from which the LCBO oversaw its retail and distribution system across the province, the property reflects the commercial and industrial heritage of the area, along with the neighbouring Redpath Sugar Complex (1957) at 95 Queen’s Quay East, which is also recognized on the City’s Heritage Register.

    Heritage Attributes

    Design or Physical Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East being a rare example of a combined provincial headquarters commercial and industrial complex and being a representative example of the Modern style:

    The Office Building:

    -   The four-storey scale, rectangular-form and massing of the building

    -   The materials, with the buff brick cladding and the brick, stone and metal detailing, which complements the adjoining Warehouse

    -   The flat roofline with the stone coping and the penthouse with the brick cladding

    -   On the rear (south) elevation, the cargo door opening at the west end of the first (ground) floor, and the window openings, including those in the second floor that are reduced in height above the adjoining single-storey building that was designed as a truck-loading bay for the Warehouse (south)

    -   The overhead pedestrian bridge with the copper cladding and the flat-headed openings connecting the south wall of the Office Building to the north wall of the Warehouse

    -   The principal (north) entrance to the building, which is centred in the wall in the glazed porch with the granite detailing and the cantilevered roof, with the metal “Province of Ontario” crest on the right (west) and left (east) sides

    -   On all of the elevations, the symmetrical arrangement of the window openings, which are recessed and set in stone frames

    -   On the north elevation, the flat-headed window openings, which are reduced in height in the first (ground) floor with the continuous stone lintels and sills, and have metal balustrades in the upper three stories

    -   The side elevations (east and west), which display flat-headed window openings with stone trim and, in the upper stories, metal balustrades

    -   On the west elevation, the entrance (originally designed for the retail store), which is set in the raised porch with the glazing, metal detailing and cantilevered roof

    -   The east elevation, where the single entrance with the flat-headed surround is centered in the first (ground) floor

    -   On the interior, the entrance lobby (north) with the stone and metal detailing (the lobby was partially altered in the 1990s)

    The Warehouse:

    -   The three-storey scale, rectangular-form and massing of the building

    -   The materials, with the concrete construction, the buff brick cladding, and the brick, stone and metal detailing, which complements the adjoining Office Building

    -   The flat roofline with the stone coping and the penthouse with brick cladding

    -   At the north end of the warehouse where it is connected to the Office Building (north), the single-storey building designed as a truck-loading bay with the brick cladding, the covered roof with the skylights, the canted corners, the openings for rolling doors (east and west) and, on the northeast corner, the flat-headed window openings with the continuous stone lintels and sills

    -   The overhead pedestrian bridge with the copper cladding and the flat-headed openings connecting the north wall of the Warehouse to the south wall of the Office Building

    -   On all of the elevations, the regular placement of the window openings, which are recessed and placed in stone surrounds

    -   The west elevation on Freeland Street, with the mixture of the flat-headed window openings with the stone trim, the punched windows and, in the first storey, the paired window openings that are protected by the canopy and placed beside the cargo door

    -   On the south elevation facing Queen’s Quay East, the flat-headed window openings with the continuous lintels and sills at the west end, the punched windows in the remainder of the wall, and the entrances in the first (ground) floor (which are additions)

    -   The east elevation on Cooper Street, with the flat-headed window openings with the continuous stone lintels and sills in the first and third stories, the punched windows in the second floor, the two tall window openings for the stairwells (which have been blocked in), and the flat-headed entrance at the south end with the rolling steel door (designed to accommodate rail cars)

    -   The north elevation facing the office building, with the glazed entrance porch at the west end of the first floor (which has been altered), the flat-headed window openings with the stone trim, some of which have metal balustrades, the continuous sills and lintels in the first and third storeys, and the punched windows at the east end of the wall

    Contextual Value:

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East as and being historically, visually, functionally and physically linked to its setting:

    -   The placement, setback and orientation of the Office Building on the south side of Lake Shore Boulevard East, between Cooper and Freeland streets, where it is connected to the Warehouse to the south by an overhead pedestrian bridge and a ground-level truck-loading bay. In this location, it reflects the commercial and industrial heritage of Toronto's central harbour and waterfront

    -   The placement, setback and orientation of the Warehouse, which is placed south of the Office Building, to which it is connected by the overhead pedestrian bridge and a ground-level truck-loading bay, and extends from Cooper Street (east) to Freeland Street (west). In this location, it reflects the commercial and industrial heritage of Toronto's harbour and central waterfront

    Note: The original garage to the south of the warehouse building was not identified in the listing of the property at 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East on the City of Toronto Heritage Register and, with the alterations to the building that have impacted its integrity, it is not identified as a heritage attribute in this report.

    Notice of an objection to the notice of intention to designate the property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of December 22, 2020, which is January 21, 2021. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

    • 55 Lake Shore Boulevard East Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 100 Simcoe Street

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 100 Simcoe Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.                                        

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 100 Simcoe Street is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.   

    Description

    The property at 100 Simcoe Street is located on the west side of Simcoe Street between Pearl Street (south) and Adelaide Street West (north) in the King-Spadina neighbourhood.  It contains a former industrial building that was constructed in two sections for Rolph and Clark Limited following the merger of two leading Toronto lithography firms.  Toronto architect G. W. Gouinlock designed the south section (1904), with the architectural firm of Sproatt and Rolph completing the complementary north section (1905).  From 1912 until 1951, the property at 100 Simcoe Street was occupied by Brown Brothers Limited, bookbinders and stationery manufacturers.  The complex was modified for commercial uses at the end of the 20th century.  

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Physical and Design Value

    The Rolph and Clark Limited Building is valued for its design as a representative example of Edwardian Classicism, which was popular for industrial and other building types in the pre-World War I era.  The subject building displays the features of the style, with the sombre red brick surfaces, the symmetrical fenestration, and the classical organization and detailing that (according to archival images) originally included elaborate cornices.  The complex was updated in the late-20th century with the addition of the fifth storey, which complements the original sections of the building with the brickwork and the segmental-arched window openings that reflect the historic fenestration.

    Historical and Associative Value

    The property at 100 Simcoe Street is valued historically for its contribution to the development, evolution and regeneration of the King-Spadina neighbourhood during the 20th century.  The area changed from an institutional enclave adjoined by residential subdivisions to Toronto's new manufacturing district after the Great Fire of 1904, which led to the merger of two leading Toronto lithography companies that occupied and expanded the industrial building at 100 Simcoe Street.  Although King-Spadina declined after World War with the departure of many industries to Toronto's suburbs, it was revived in the 1960s when entrepreneur Edwin "Honest Ed" Mirvish restored the Royal Alexandra Theatre and adapted the neighbouring early-20th century warehouses for restaurants.  In the late 1980s, the property at 100 Simcoe Street was converted from industrial to commercial uses as part of the ongoing transformation of King-Spadina.

    The cultural heritage value of the Rolph and Clark Limited Building is also through its historical association with significant businesses in King-Spadina.  After the Great Fire of 1904 destroyed the premises of the Rolph, Smith and Company, it merged with the rival Clark Lithographing Company as Rolph and Clark Limited and completed the complex at 100 Simcoe Street.  Rolph and Clark Limited left King-Spadina in 1912 (prior to the company's amalgamation with lithographers Stone Limited as Rolph-Clark-Stone Limited) and sold the subject property to Brown Brothers Limited.  For the next 40 years, Brown Brothers Limited operated its bookbindery and business stationery company at 100 Simcoe Street.

    The Rolph and Clark Limited Building's historical value is also through its links to important Toronto architects.  Famed practitioner G. W. Gouinlock received the commission for the south section of the building at 100 Simcoe Street after designing the headquarters of the Toronto Lithography Company (1901), a designated heritage property at 461 King Street West.  The Rolph and Clark Limited Building reflected Gouinlock's ability to design high-end classically-inspired buildings, a skill that contributed to his subsequent role as official architect of the Canadian National Exhibition where he oversaw the early-20th century reorganization of the grounds with more than a dozen new structures, including several commemorated as National Historic Sites.  The north section of the Rolph and Clark Limited Building was completed by the notable Toronto architectural partnership of Sproatt and Rolph as an early example of the firm's work.  While Sproatt and Rolph had a personal connection to the project (Ernest Rolph was the son of Rolph and Clark Limited's co-founder), it demonstrated the architects' dexterity in the design of a complementary yet distinguishable extension to the complex, and prefaced Sproatt and Rolph's success in designing other industrial edifices in King-Spadina and landmark buildings throughout Toronto.

    Contextual Value

    Contextually, the property at 100 Simcoe Street has value through its support for the historical character of the King-Spadina neighbourhood where it is part of an important collection of former factories and warehouses that changed the area from its origins as an institutional and residential district to Toronto's new manufacturing centre following the Great Fire of 1904 and, in the late-20th century, evolved into a commercial hub and the city's Entertainment District.   With its location on Simcoe Street, the Rolph and Clark Limited Building anchors the east end of the King-Spadina neighbourhood.

    The Rolph and Clark Limited Building is historically and visually linked to its setting on the west side of Simcoe where it extends along the block from Pearl Street to Adelaide Street West.  The property at 100 Simcoe Street forms part of an enclave of surviving early-20th century industrial buildings northwest of King and Simcoe streets, including the collection of former factories and warehouses on King Street West between Simcoe and John streets and on Duncan Street, north of King, which are recognized on the City of Toronto's Heritage Register.

    Heritage Attributes of the Rolph and Clark Limited Building at 100 Simcoe Street are:

    -   The placement, setback and orientation of the building on the west side of Simcoe Street between Pearl Street and Adelaide Street West

    -   The scale, form and massing of the five-storey building above the raised base with the window openings

    -   The materials, with the red brick cladding and the brick and stone detailing

    -   The flat roofline covering the complex

    -   The organization of the building into the south (1904) and north (1905) sections, which are distinguished from one another by the paired openings on the north section

    -   The south section of the building, which extends eight bays on Simcoe Street (east) and six bays on Pearl Street (south), with the canted southeast corner

    -   The fenestration on the south section (east and south elevations), with the flat-headed window openings with the stone lintels in the first, second and fourth stories and the segmental-arched window openings with the brick voussoirs and stone keystones in the third storey

    -   The entrance on the east wall of the south section, which is placed in the northernmost bay (the eighth bay from the south end) and reflects the late-20th century conversion of the building from industrial to commercial uses

    -   The north section, which extends four double bays on both Simcoe Street (east) and Adelaide Street West (north), with the single bay at the west end of the north elevation with the entrance at the base (the entrance has been modified)

    -   The fenestration on the north section (east and north elevations), where the flat-headed window openings in the first, second and fourth stories and the segmental-arched window openings in the third storey have brick and stone detailing and are arranged in pairs (apart from the single openings in the westernmost bay of the north elevation)

    -   The fifth storey, which was added in the late-20th century and extends across the north and south sections, with the complementary red brickwork with brick and stone trim, and the symmetrically-placed regular and oversized segmental-arched window openings that reference the shape and detailing of the third-storey openings

    The window opening at the base of the southeast corner (which replaced the original corner entrance), the adjoining entrance opening in the southernmost bay of the east elevation, and the cladding adjoining the latter openings are not identified as heritage attributes.

    Notice of an objection to the notice of intention to designate the property may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of December 22, 2020, which is January 21, 2021. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

    • 100 Simcoe Street Toronto Ontario

    Amendment of Designating By-law - 197 King Street East

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1153-2020 to amend former City of Toronto By-law 91-91 to designate 197 King Street East (Toronto Centre - Ward 13) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 197 King Street East Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 1138-2020 - 3 Mutual Street, 98, 100, 102 and 104 Queen Street East

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1138-2020 to designate 3 Mutual Street, 98, 100, 102 and 104 Queen Street East (Toronto Centre, Ward 13) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 3 Mutual Street Toronto Ontario
    • 98 Queen Street East Toronto Ontario
    • 100 Queen Street East Toronto Ontario
    • 102 Queen Street East Toronto Ontario
    • 104 Queen Street East Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 578 King Street West

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1173-2020 to designate 578 King Street West (including the entrance address at 580 King Street West) (Spadina-Fort York, Ward 10) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 578 King Street West Toronto Ontario
    • 580 King Street West Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 1175-2020 - 2106 Yonge Street (including the entrance addresses at 2108 and 2110 Yonge Street)

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1175-2020 to designate 2106 Yonge Street (including the entrance addresses at 2108 and 2110 Yonge Street) (Toronto-St. Paul's, Ward 12) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 2106 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 1144-2020 – 663-665 Huron Street

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1144-2020 to designate 663-665 Huron Street (University-Rosedale, Ward 11) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 663 Huron Street Toronto Ontario
    • 665 Huron Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 1139-2020 - 41 Wabash Avenue

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1139-2020 to designate 41 Wabash Avenue (Parkdale-High Park, Ward 4) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 41 Wabash Avenue Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 1141-2020 - 191, 193, 195 and 197 Church Street

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1141-2020 to designate 191, 193, 195 and 197 Church Street (Toronto Centre, Ward 13) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 191 Church Street Toronto Ontario
    • 193 Church Street Toronto Ontario
    • 195 Church Street Toronto Ontario
    • 197 Church Street Toronto Ontario

    Amendment of Designating By-law - 292 Main Street

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1146-2020 to amend By-law 935-2020 to designate 292 Main Street (Beaches-East York, Ward 19) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 292 Main Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate – 1150 Eglinton Avenue East

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1154-2020 to designate 1150 Eglinton Avenue East (Don Valley East, Ward 16) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 1150 Eglinton Avenue West Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 1142-2020 - 305 (309, 311) King Street West

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1142-2020 to designate 305 (309, 311) King Street West (Spadina-Fort York, Ward 10) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 305 King Street West Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 1143-2020 – 661 Huron Street

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1143-2020 to designate 661 Huron Street (University-Rosedale, Ward 11) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 661 Huron Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 1140-2020 - 176-178 Front Street East and 33 Sherbourne Street

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1140-2020 to designate 176-178 Front Street East and 33 Sherbourne Street (Toronto Centre, Ward 13) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 176 Front Street East Toronto Ontario
    • 178 Front Street East Toronto Ontario
    • 33 Sherbourne Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 1174-2020 - 2100 Yonge Street (including the entrance addresses at 2102 and 2104 Yonge Street and 8 and 12 Manor Road West)

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 1174-2020 to designate 2100 Yonge Street (including the entrance addresses at 2102 and 2104 Yonge Street and 8 and 12 Manor Road West) (Toronto-St. Paul's, Ward 12) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 2100 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario

    Heritage Notices - June 29 and 30, 2020

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    At its meeting on June 29 and 30, 2020:

    City Council adopted the following:

    Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   582 King Street West.  See City Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines for the objection period to City Council’s notice of intention to designate a property is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the objection period to the notice of intention to designate a property will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve a notice of intention to designate a property pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

     

     

     

    • 582 King Street West Toronto Ontario

    Heritage Notices - February 26, 2020

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    At its meeting on February 26, 2020

    City Council adopted the following:

    Alterations to a property designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   197 King Street East. See City Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines, including such notice periods for which the City is subject to under the Ontario Heritage Act is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the notice period will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve the required notice pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

    • 197 King Street East Toronto Ontario