Public Notice

Welcome to the City of Toronto's Public Notice website.

The City gives notice to the public on a variety of different matters, such as fees and charges, heritage designations, renaming of roads, and sale of property.

The City also gives notice through the newspaper, mail, or personal service, depending on legislation.

Current notices are listed below by date of posting. You can search for a current notice by word, phrase, topic, municipal ward, and/or date. You can also search past notices and access open data by clicking Search & Open Data.

Current Notices

Current Notices

Amendment of Designating By-law - 206 Russell Hill Road

Topic

  • Heritage > Amendment to the designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-09-14

Notice of Intention to Designate - 582 King Street West

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-09-14

Notice of Intention to Designate - 65 George Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-09-14

Notice of Decision - 129 Bedford Road

Topic

  • Heritage > Decision on alteration to a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-09-14

Notice of Intention to Designate - 501 Vesta Drive

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-09-14

Notice of Intention to Designate - 292 Main Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-09-14

Notice of Intention to Designate - 1150 Eglinton Avenue East

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-09-14

Notice of Intention to Designate - 2490-2506 Yonge Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-09-14

Notice of Decision - 197 King Street East

Topic

  • Heritage > Decision on alteration to a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-09-14

Notice of Decision - 481 University Avenue (including 210 Dundas Street West)

Topic

  • Heritage > Decision on alteration to a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-09-14

Notice Date

2020-09-09

Heritage Notices - June 29 and 30, 2020

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-08-07

Heritage Notices - February 26, 2020

Topic

  • Heritage > Decision on alteration to a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-08-07

Heritage Notices - May 28, 2020

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property
  • Heritage > Decision on alteration to a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-08-07

Heritage Notices - July 28 and 29, 2020

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property
  • Heritage > Amendment to the designation of a heritage property
  • Heritage > Decision on alteration to a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-08-07

    Total Records Found: 18

    Legend

    This extract of Notices is published for reference convenience. Only those Notices that have an address or location focus are listed. Please refer to the list of notices for complete list of current or archived notices.

    Mapped Notices

    Amendment of Designating By-law - 206 Russell Hill Road

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    Take notice that City Council intends to amend City of Toronto By-law 335-2020, a by-law designating the property at 206 Russell Hill Road as being of cultural heritage value or interest, in order to correct the legal description in the By-law, in accordance with Section 30.1(3) of the Ontario Heritage Act.

    Following the passing of By-Law 335-2020, dated April 30, 2020, it was noted that the legal description was incorrectly stated as "PIN 21222-0046 (LT), PART OF LOT 72, PART OF 3 FT RESERVE, REGISTERED PLAN 364E" in Schedule B of the by-law.

    The correct legal description is "PIN 21222-0046 (LT), PART OF LOT 72, PART OF 3 FT RESERVE, REGISTERED PLAN 364E AS IN CA392919."

    Notice of an objection to the amendment of the designating by-law may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of September 14, 2020 which is October 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

    • 206 Russell Hill Road Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 582 King Street West

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 582 King Street West under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 582 King Street West is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.  The property was listed on the City of Toronto's Heritage Inventory in 2005 and identified as a contributing property in the King-Spadina Heritage Conservation District Plan (2017) currently under appeal. 

    Description

    The property at 582 King Street West (including the entrance addresses at 590 and 592 King Street West and 471 and 473 Adelaide Street West) extends from the north side of King Street West to the south side of Adelaide Street West in the block east of Portland Street. The property contains a collection of two four-storey factory-type buildings at 582-592 King Street West and one four-storey factory-type building and two-storey wing at 473 Adelaide Street West - all completed in 1902-1911 and commissioned by Canadian Kodak Company Ltd., to the designs of architects Chadwick & Beckett and F. A. Fifield.  A single-storey garage facing Adelaide Street West, designed by Kaplan & Sprachman architects, was added to the property in 1928-31 by Ontario Silknit Ltd. 

    Canadian Kodak Company Ltd. purchased and occupied the property from 1902 until 1917, after which it was occupied by a variety of tenants including the Toronto Terminal Warehouse, later known as the Canadian Rail and Harbour Terminals.  Ontario Silknit Ltd. purchased the property in 1927 and occupied the premises for over 60 years with a variety of garment industry-related businesses. 

    The property at 582 King Street contains four buildings as follows:

    588-592 King Street West, (original address, now the western half of the complex on King Street known as 590 King Street West), four-storey building constructed in 1902.

    582-586 King Street West, (original address, now the eastern half of the complex on King Street known as 590 King Street West), four-storey building constructed in 1904.

    473 Adelaide Street West, a four-storey building with a two-storey wing constructed in 1909-10.  The four-storey section of this building bridges across a laneway at the second to fourth floor levels to connect with the rear of the western half of the King Street buildings. 

    471 Adelaide Street West, a single-storey garage building constructed in 1928-1931 by Ontario Silknit Ltd.

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    The property at 582 King Street West contains a complex of buildings which have design and physical value as representatives of well-crafted, early 20th-century factory buildings. The long rectangular plans of the three four-storey buildings and two-storey wing, with brick cladding, and regularly spaced window openings expressive of the internal post and beam structure and factory function, are characteristic features of the factory building type.  Elements of the Edwardian Classical style are evident in the brick and stone detailing and the hierarchy and symmetry of the arrangement of openings of the principal south elevations of 582-592 King Street.  Further design value is present in the garage with its Style Moderne characteristics seen in the stepped parapet and in the pilasters which terminate on the face of parapet.

    The property has historical value through its potential to yield information about the development of the King-Spadina neighbourhood in the early 1900s as an important industrial centre which contributed to Toronto's prosperity and provided employment for over 120 years. It has value through its direct association with the Canadian Kodak Company Ltd. which constructed its first purpose built retail and manufacturing complex on the property and occupied it for 15 years, expanding with new buildings as well new business products, increasing output and employment substantially in that short time. The complex has further associative and historic value as it was occupied for over 60 years by Ontario Silknit Ltd. whose garment manufacturing provided employment for generations as well as the "Fashion District" identity of the King Spadina neighbourhood The "Lovable" signage painted on the brick of the east elevation at 473 Adelaide Street West retains this identity and Silknit's lingerie manufacturing legacy. 

    The property has further associative value as it demonstrates the work of two Toronto-based architectural firms, Chadwick & Beckett and Kaplan & Sprachman.  Chadwick & Beckett (1893-1917) were a prolific firm with numerous commissions which included a wide variety of buildings types: the architects made a particular contribution to the design of industrial buildings across the City of Toronto in the first decade of the twentieth century. Kaplan & Sprachman (c. 1926-1951) were nationally renowned for their designs of hundreds of movie theatres across the county in the 1930s and 1940s, frequently featuring the Style Moderne style. Their commissions included a variety of other building typologies including industrial buildings like the garage which features the Style Moderne.  

    Located to the east of Portland Street with prominent elevations on both King Street West and Adelaide Street West, the property of three, four-storey brick clad buildings with Edwardian Classical style details and the rear bridge over the laneway is important in defining the early 20th-century industrial character of the area as it maintains the scale, material qualities and design patterns of the factory structures.  Built between 1902 and 1911, and having been a centre of enterprise and employment for almost 120 years, the factory complex is functionally, visually and historically linked to its surroundings and contributed to the identity of the King Spadina neighbourhood.  The 473 Adelaide Street West building contributes to the street wall framing the view of St. Mary's Church (1885-1904) which terminates Adelaide Street West at Bathurst Street.

    Heritage Attributes

    The heritage attributes of the entire property at 582 King Street West including the various blocks described below are:

    -         The setback, placement and orientation of the building complex on the property to the east of Portland Street and extending from the north side of King Street West to the south side of Adelaide Street West

    588-592 King Street West

    The heritage attributes of the west building originally known 588-592 King Street West, (now the western half of the complex on King Street known as 590 King Street West) are:

    -         The scale, form and massing of the long, four-storey rectangular volume of the building with saw-tooth roof monitors 

    -         The materials including brick cladding with stone details in the window sills, and on the principal (south) elevation the stone lintels in the window openings and the stone bases for the pilasters which returns as a plinth on the west elevation

    -         Principal (south) elevation: the brick detailing seen in the banded pilasters and banding of the wall section spanning below the first floor window, the projecting keystones and voussoirs in the segmental-arched and flat window heads at the second and third floor levels

    -         Principal (south) elevation: the arrangement of the window openings with three large windows at the two first floors and basement, with smaller windows at the upper two levels with five openings

    -         Principal (south) elevation: the combination of segmental-arched and flat-headed windows

    -         Principal (south) elevation: the division of the glazing in the first two floors of windows (first to second floor) into 6 lights, with three taller lower lights with a wider central light and the division of glazing in the basement level into three lights with a wider central light

    -         Principal (south) elevation: the division of the window glazing at the third and fourth floor levels into two lights (please note: to match the original double-hung sash, these should be equivalent)

    -         Rear (north) elevation: the loading bay with the raised walkway, canopy and brackets with decorative moulding and trellis-like panels supporting the sloping roof above the walkway

    -         Rear (north) and side (west) elevations of the building with the regularly spaced, long, rectangular window openings with segmental-arched headers

    582-586 King Street West

    The heritage attributes of the eastern building originally known 582-586 King Street West, (now the eastern half of the complex on King Street known as 590 King Street West) are:

    -         The scale, form and massing of four-storey building, with saw-tooth roof monitors 

    -         The materials include brick cladding with stone details in the door frame of the principal entrance, the stone sills, and the stone bases of the pilasters

    -         Principal (south) elevation: the brick pilasters, fourth at the first three levels and two at the outer edges of the upper two levels

    -         Principal (south) elevation: the arrangement of the window openings with three large windows at the two first floors and basement and three groups of paired windows on at the third and fourth floor levels

    -         Principal (south) elevation: the segmental-arched window openings

    -         Principal (south) elevation: the division of the glazing in the first two floors of windows (first to second floor) into 6 lights, with three taller lower lights with a wider central light and the division of glazing in the basement level into three lights with a wider central light

    -         Principal (south) elevation: the division of the window glazing at the third and fourth floor levels into two lights (please note: to match the original double-hung sash, these should be equivalent)

    -         Rear (north) elevation: the loading bay with the raised walkway

    471 Adelaide Street West

    The heritage attributes of the building fronting on Adelaide Street West and known as 471 Adelaide Street West are:

    -         The scale, form and massing of the single-storey garage, with a gable roof with roof monitor

    -         The materials include brick cladding with stone details in the building base

    -         Principal north elevation: the four brick piers, the stepped parapet with the raised central section over two bays and the four (glazed) openings

    473 Adelaide Street West

    The heritage attributes of the northern block fronting on Adelaide Street West and known as 473 Adelaide Street West are:

    -         The scale, form and massing of the four-storey building with saw-tooth roof monitors

    -         The building bridges over the laneway connecting with the rear of the 582-586 King Street West section of the complex

    -         The materials include brick cladding with stone sills on the north, east and west elevations of the building the regularly spaced, long narrow window openings with segmental-arched headers and the stone plinth on the principal (north) elevation

    -         On the principal (north) and side (east and west) elevations of the building the regularly spaced, long narrow window openings with segmental-arched openings

    -         Principal (north) elevation: the entrance opening at the west corner of the elevation and the pair of window openings at the centre

    -         Principal (north) elevation: the brick detailing including the brick piers, the stepped brick courses between the piers and the decorative banding and relief pattern created by brick headers at the cornice line

    -         Side (east and west) elevations: the return of the cornice with the decorative banding and relief pattern created by brick headers at the cornice line

    -         Rear (north) elevation: the loading bay entrances

    -         Side, (east) elevation the signage painted on the brick cladding with the word 'LOVABLE' which advertised the Lovable Brassiere Company Ltd.

    The following have not been identified as heritage attributes:

    - The two-storey wing at 473 Adelaide Street West which has only one visible elevation facing the laneway and lacks integrity due to substantial alterations                                                         

    Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of September 14, 2020, which is October 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

    • 582 King Street West Toronto Ontario
    • 590 King Street West Toronto Ontario
    • 592 King Street West Toronto Ontario
    • 471 Adelaide Street West Toronto Ontario
    • 473 Adelaide Street West Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 65 George Street

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 65 George Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

    Little York Hotel Stables and Coach House

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 65 George Street, containing the Little York Stables and Coach House, is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.  The property was listed on the City of Toronto's Heritage Inventory in 1983 and identified as a contributing property in the St. Lawrence Neighbourhood Heritage Conservation District (2015) currently under appeal. 

    Description

    Located on the east side of George Street, just south of King Street East, the property at 65 George Street contains the stables and coach house building.  It was constructed in 1880 as part of the adjacent Little York Hotel at 187 King Street East, located to the north of the subject property at the south-east corner of King Street East and George Street. The hotel and stables-coach house were part of the same property until they were severed into two lots in 1977.  The stables and coach house originally contained a lower floor with stables and carriage storage with an upper level hay loft.  Between 1885 and 1973 the second floor of the stables and coach house building was altered in various forms including additions to the second floor, but these additions and alterations were removed with further alterations and restoration in the 1980s. 

    The Little York Hotel was included on the City's first Heritage Inventory (now known as the Heritage Register) in 1973 and designated under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act in 1979.  A Heritage Easement Agreement for the 187 King Street East property was registered on the property title in 1980.  Restoration of the exterior of the hotel, which included removing the blue paint applied to the brick elevations, was begun in 1978. 

    The stables were listed on the City's Heritage Register in 1984.  In 1983, restoration and renovation work began with the removal of the blue paint from the principal (west) elevation. The renovations, which included the reconstruction of the second storey elevation with five new windows and the raising and reconstruction of the parapet, were undertaken in 1988.  The ground floor windows adjacent to the carriageway were restored, removing a doorway. The carriage way was given a recessed glazed entry and the northern-most ground floor window was lengthened to accommodate a secondary exit.  The use of the building was changed to accommodate a retail store and offices.  In 1993 the use was again changed to accommodate a public hall and offices. The former stables and coach-house are currently occupied as an art gallery. 

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    The former 1880s Little York Hotel coach house and stables at 65 George Street is representative of a once common and now rare 19th century building type. Constructed as part of the Little York Hotel, the stables-coach house building retains the stylistic features of the complex in its details and in the original carriage way entrance.  Although the upper floor represents a recent addition, it has been done in a sympathetic manner which reconstructed the original parapet and whose new windows have the segmental-arched openings of the adjacent second floor hotel windows.  The lack of keystones in the window heads and the inclusion of a projecting brick course are consistent with good conservation practise of the time which required new additions to be distinct but complementary to the existing heritage building. The three arched ground floor windows to the north of the carriage entrance likely date from the late 1880s or early 1890s and, although not original, have been part of the complex for over 120 years.  The windows are consistent in detail and composition with the original design for the adjacent hotel windows and the stables-coach house entryway. The small window to the south is also not believed to have been part of the original building, but is also likely over 100 years old and features a segmental-arched opening and a stone sill. The stables-coach house building has sufficient integrity to convey its original purpose as part of the hotel complex and displays a level of craftsmanship consistent for a stable-coach house, which maintains the stylistic elements of the main hotel building.

    As part of the Little York Hotel complex, the stables and coach house building have historic and associative value as they yield information about the Old Town of York Neighbourhood and the culture of travel and transportation in late 19th-century City of Toronto.

    The entire Little York Hotel complex, including the stables and coach house were constructed to the designs of the prominent and prolific architectural firm of Langley, Langley & Burke.  Their work as a partnership and as individuals extended for more than 60 years in the City of Toronto and was well-represented in institutional, ecclesiastical and commercial buildings. The Little York Hotel complex represents their use of the Second Empire style, which Langley had applied to important public buildings such as Government House, 1868 and the General Post Office, 1871-4, to a smaller commercial hotel.  As both the Government House and the General Post Office buildings have been demolished the hotel-stables and coach house complex are rare survivors of the Second Empire style phase of their work.

    Located in the historic St. Lawrence Neighbourhood Heritage Conservation District on the edge of the original 1793 Town of York, the Little York Hotel complex represents commercial development along King Street in the 1880s.  The stables and coach-house have contextual value as part of the Little York Hotel.  The hotel and stables-coach house are important in maintaining and defining the character of the area through their massing, scale, materials and details and through their indication of a pattern of life and travel no longer prevalent, from 140 years ago.  In its building form and details it is physically, functionally, visually and historically linked to its surroundings.

    Heritage Attributes

    The heritage attributes of the Little York Hotel Stables and Coach-house building located at 65 George Street are:

    -         The location of the building as it fronts on to the east side of George Street adjacent to and contiguous with the former Little York Hotel building

    -         The elevation of the original one-storey building

    -         The materials include brick cladding with stone sills on the west elevation of the building with the brick string courses, dentil courses and cast-stone keystones in the elliptical and round-arched openings of the carriage way and windows

    -         The openings including the elliptical-arched carriage way opening and the three adjacent, semi-circular arched window openings.

    Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of September 14, 2020 which is October 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

    • 65 George Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Decision - 129 Bedford Road

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto on July 28, 2020, having considered an application to alter a structure designated under Part V of the Ontario Heritage Act for 129 Bedford Road, decided among other things, to

    1. Approve the alterations to the heritage building at 129 Bedford Road, in accordance with Section 42 of the Ontario Heritage Act, to allow for alterations in connection with the installation of a new entrance door on lands known municipally as 129 Bedford Road, with such alterations substantially in accordance with the plans and drawings prepared by Sixteen Degrees Studio Inc., dated February 21, 2020 and filed with the Senior Manager, Heritage Planning subject to the following:

    a. That prior to the issuance of any heritage permit for the property at 129 Bedford Road, but excluding permits for interior work, repairs and maintenance and usual and minor works for the existing heritage building as are acceptable to the Senior Manager, Heritage Planning, the applicant provide the following to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Planning:

    1. Final building permit drawings for the proposed alterations consistent with the plans and elevations submitted by the applicant and prepared by Sixteen Degrees Studio Inc., dated February 21, 2020.

    2. A detailed landscape plan for the subject property, satisfactory to the Senior Manager, Heritage Planning.

    Appeal to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal

    The Ontario Heritage Act states that if a Council of a municipality consents to an application to alter a designated heritage property subject to certain terms or conditions, or refuses the application, the owner may, within thirty days of the day the owner received notice of Council’s decision, give notice of appeal to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal and to the Clerk of the municipality: Attention Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 2nd Floor West, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2.

    Notice of appeal must be received on or before October 14, 2020.

    A notice of appeal shall set out the reasons for objection to the decision of Council and be accompanied by the fee prescribed ($300.00) under the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal.

    • 129 Bedford Road Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 501 Vesta Drive

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 501 Vesta Drive under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

    Lady Edith J. Baillie House        

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 501 Vesta Drive is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design-physical, historical-associative and contextual value.                       

    Description

    Located on the east side of Vesta Drive just north of the junction with Old Forest Hill Road, the property at 501 Vesta Drive is part of a collection of residential properties in the Forest Hill neighbourhood, several of them designed by the same architect, Douglas E. Kertland.  By provide a cohesive architectural character through their shared qualities of scale, form and massing, materials and details typical of the 1920s and 1930s, these properties create a sense of place.  Built by Wilfred E. Whitten, who commissioned Kertland, the grand Arts and Crafts movement house with Tudor Revival style elements of two-and-a-half storeys features a variety of hipped and gabled roofs with prominent chimneys, bay windows and stone with stucco and half-timbering cladding.  Originally owned by the philanthropist Lady Edith J. Baillie, widow of Sir Frank Baillie, the house was subsequently owned for over 60 years by the construction magnate and philanthropist Morry Wingold and his wife Sarah Wingold. 

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    The Lady Edith J. Baillie house has design value as an excellent representative of a grand Tudor Revival style house whose design reflects Arts and Crafts movement principles.  The Arts and Crafts elements are present in the picturesque composition of the asymmetrical building massing and elevations, the combination of steeply pitched hipped and gabled roofs punctuated by dormers and tall chimneys, the recessed entry porch and projecting bay windows, the variety of window types, arched and flat-headed openings and the cladding which combines rough-cut stone of varying shades with smooth stone around the windows and door openings, and half-timbering on stucco in various patterns.  The Tudor Revival style is expressed in the broad Tudor arch of the principal entry opening and panelled door, the wood shields on the west elevation and the half-timbering with carved corner columns on the south-facing, gable-roofed bay. 

    The Baillie house displays a high degree of artistic merit in the variety evident in the overall building massing, the combination of multiple gable and hipped roofs punctuated with dormers and tall chimneys and in the wealth of detail seen in the materials, including rough and smooth stone, stucco and half timbering, and the range of door and window opening combinations. A high degree of craftsmanship is present in the skilled carpentry required to construct the complex roofscape and in the masonry with its random patterns of various shades and shapes of stone with rough-hewn and smooth surfaces. 

    The siting of the house on its property with its principal south elevation facing the garden and the narrower, west side elevation facing Vesta Drive is characteristic of the informal quality of Arts and Crafts architecture which responds to the site's topography and orientation.  This unusual arrangement is enhanced by the diagonal stone entry path which creates a north-east route to the principal entrance located at the south-west corner of the house with its stone steps and landscaped terraces. 

    The property has historic value as it has direct association with its first owner Lady Edith J. Baillie (1877-1965) who was recognized for her lifelong contribution to all forms of "public spirited work" during peace and war-times.  Lady Baillie was the widow of Sir Frank Baillie who was knighted in 1918 for his war-time service to the British government and was a successful financier and innovative industrialist.  The property is also valued for its association with Morry and Sarah Wingold who occupied the property for 60 years.  Morry was the president of Wingold Construction and a well-known philanthropist, recognized for "his outstanding leadership and community service."   After his death in 1983, Sarah continued living in the house until 2019.  

    Constructed in 1930 shortly after the incorporation of Forest Hill Village, the Baillie house contributes to an understanding of the early history of Forest Hill as a residential enclave whose early design by-laws and practises resulted in the carefully crafted, landscaped neighbourhood that exists today.

    The Baillie house is representative of the highly-regarded architect Douglas E. Kertland, who won the competition to design the CNE's Automotive Building (1928-9).  Kertland's residential architecture was widely published from the mid-1920s to the 1940s and he designed several houses which are adjacent to or in the vicinity of the Baillie House. 

    Situated on the east side of Vesta Drive just north of the junction with Old Forest Hill Road, the Baillie house maintains and supports the character of the neighbourhood, contributing to its sense of place. It is one in a series of Arts and Crafts houses with Tudor Revival style details sharing a two-and-a-half storey-scale with complex asymmetrical massing, a unified mix of materials featuring stone, stucco, half-timbering and brick and a consistent landscaped and well-treed setback.  Constructed in 1930, as one of a number of Kertland-designed houses in the neighborhood, and as a part of the development of the Forest Hill Village, the house is functionally, visually and historically linked to its surroundings

    The heritage attributes of the Baillie House property at 501 Vesta Drive are:

    -         The setback, placement and orientation of the house-form building on the east side of Vesta Drive with its principal elevation facing the garden to the south

    -         The scale, form and massing of the two-and-a-half-storey house with its asymmetrically composed building massing and roofscape combining hipped and gabled roofs, with flaring bell-cast curved edges, punctuated by dormer windows and two tall chimneys, bay windows and a recessed, south-facing principal entrance

    -         The stone cladding material which includes rough-hewn, multi-toned stone with dark mortar at the first floor and part of the second floor, smooth ashlar-finished stone around the primary entryway, adjacent windows and the bay-windows on the west elevation

    -         The stucco and half-timbering featured primarily on the second floor level but also in the stair-case bay on the west elevation, the gable roofed bay on the south elevation (please note: the original architect's drawings indicate that this bay was to have brick laid in a diagonal pattern which may still exist under the current stucco surface)

    -         The wood elements including the shields which appear in the centre of two stucco panels on the west elevation, the turned columns on corbel brackets flanking the gabled bay on the south elevation with the drop pendant in the gable roof of this same bay

    -         The copper material used in the gutters and down spouts which have a rectangular section

    -         The windows which are typically arranged in banks of vertical openings between wood or stone frames and have leaded or wood glazing bars, with flat or arched openings including the two pairs adjacent to the main entrance which feature flat headed Tudor arches, the single opening next to the main entrance with its semi-circular arched opening and the dormer windows which have segmentally-curved roofs.  On the south elevation, the single-storey bay window with its hipped roof extending to provide a recess for the adjacent door

    -         The main entrance in the south elevation with a Tudor-arched opening with its deep smooth stone recess framing the wood door with its vertical panels beneath a single window

    -         The diagonal stone path leading to the principal entrance flanked by a terraced landscape

    Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of September 14, 2020 which is October 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

    • 501 Vesta Drive Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 292 Main Street

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 292 Main Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 292 Main Street is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.  

    Description

    The property at 292 Main Street is located in the East End-Danforth neighbourhood (formerly East Toronto), on the west side of the street between Danforth Avenue and Stephenson Avenue. The property at 292 Main Street contains a single two-storey, detached house-form building completed by 1887.

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    The house-form building at 292 Main Street represents a rare example of an Ontario Cottage style dwelling in the area. This style is evident from the form and organization of openings on the building’s south elevation, which was once the principal elevation. At a later date, the orientation of the principal elevation shifted to the east. The building's design incorporates many High Victorian era embellishments, including the well preserved, fine craftsmanship of its polychromatic brickwork and brick detailing, which is impressive in its employment on all four elevations and suggests the building's visual prominence upon its completion, both on its lot and near the intersection of Main and Danforth.

    The subject property is valued for its association with one of East Toronto's most significant residents, Donald George Stephenson, who was a local lumber merchant, landowner and politician, having acted as the Village of East Toronto's first Reeve (1888-1894). Stephenson was also a local speculator/builder who is attributed to having built many brick dwellings in the area in the last quarter of the 19th century, including the subject property at 292 Main Street, where he likely resided until moving to his final residence at the northwest corner of Gerrard Street East and Enderby Road.  

    Contextually, the house-form building at 292 Main Street defines, supports and maintains the historic character of this portion of East Toronto, where a burgeoning population of railway workers settled following the opening of Grand Trunk Railway's freight yard and station in the mid-1880s. The property is valued as a unique and fine example among a collection of polychromatic brick dwellings located in the Main Street and Stephenson Avenue area attributed to D. G. Stephenson.

    Heritage Attributes

    The heritage attributes of the property at 292 Main Street are:

    -         The scale, form and massing of the 2-storey detached house-form building

    -         The setback of the building on the west side of Main Street between Danforth Avenue and Stephenson Avenue

    -         The materials, with the red and buff brick cladding and detailing on all four elevations

    -         The main gabled roof and the smaller, flat roof surmounting the single-storey bay window on the east elevation, as well as the chimney

    -         The south elevation, which was originally the principal elevation with its centred entrance, flanked by a window opening to either side (currently bricked in), and surmounted by a centred roof gable containing a pointed-arch/lancet-shaped attic opening with wooden louvres

    -         The east elevation, which is organized into two bays with the entrance at the north end and single-storey bay window at the south end, and two symmetrically-placed openings in the upper storey

    -         The placement of the segmental-arched door and window openings on all four elevations

    -         The decorative buff-coloured brickwork on all four elevations, with the two double string-courses running along the top and bottom of the upper storey, the drop pendant motif above all door and window openings, the stepped buff brick base, and the three soldier courses set in a sawtooth pattern below each of the openings in the bay window on the east elevation

    -         The decorative metalwork balustrade crowning the flat roof of the single-storey bay window on the east elevation 

    Note: the wooden vestibule addition to the entrance on the east elevation is not original and not identified as a heritage attribute

    Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of September 14, 2020, which is October 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

    • 292 Main Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 1150 Eglinton Avenue East

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 1150 Eglinton Avenue East under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 1150 Eglinton Avenue East is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.

    Description

    Located in the Don Mills neighbourhood on the north side of Eglinton Avenue East, west of the intersection with Don Mills Road and contained by the CPR railway line and the Don River ravine, the property contains the former Canadian IBM headquarters building.  The building complex is composed of a central, three-storey block with five wings of one to four storeys completed in 1967 and extended in 1970-71.  The building is clad in brick, with a glazing system of solar-bronze tinted glass with black anodized window frames and spandrel panels.  Set on a hill top surrounded by mature trees and lawns, its wings form a series of courtyards with lawns. The north entry court features a circular drive with a circle of formally landscaped planting. 

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    The former IBM headquarters building has design value as a representative of a corporate headquarters building in the Late Modern style.  The building displays a high degree of craftsmanship and artistic merit in its innovative and dramatically simple composition of blocks which are clad in alternating plain brick and window walls divided into tall vertical openings, framed by narrow brick piers and which step incrementally in relation to the surrounding lawns, mature planting and hill-top setting which responds to the adjacent Don Valley ravine landscape.  The high quality design was recognized in 1970 with a nomination for a Massey Medal for Architecture. 

    The headquarters building has historic value as it is associated with IBM, the technologically innovative and internationally influential American company and its development and expansion in Canada over the past century.  It was with the opening of its Canadian subsidiary in Toronto in 1917 that the company first acquired its identity as International Business Machines Co. Ltd. (IBM).  The building is also valued for its association with the history and development of Don Mills from a 19th century settlement to a significant mid-20th century, fully-planned subdivision, privately developed by E. P. Taylor.  It is also valued for its association with the architectural firm John B. Parkin Associates, one of Canada's leading Modernist and most prolific firms of the 1950s and 1960s who contributed many significant buildings to Don Mills during this period.

    Situated on a well-treed hill-top overlooking Eglinton Avenue, contained by the historic factors of the Don Mills Road, Eglinton Avenue, the CPR railway line and Don Valley ravine, the property has contextual value as a landmark within the community for over 60 years.  It is also valued for maintaining the character of the area which features many mid-century modern industrial buildings of distinctive high-quality design surrounding Don Mills.  The design of the building and landscape responds to, and provides continuity with, the adjacent Don Valley River ravine.  As a successor to IBM's first industrial building in Don Mills, it is visually, physically and historically linked to its surroundings. 

    Heritage Attributes

    The heritage attributes of the former IBM headquarters building completed in 1967 and extended in 1970 on the property at 1150 Eglinton Avenue East are:

    -         The placement, set back and orientation of the building, as it is located on the north side of Eglinton Avenue.

    -         The setting of the building on a hill top, surrounded by trees and shrubs, with a series of open courtyards with grass lawns extending around the complex

    -         The arrival sequence to the north entrance with the driveway approaching on axis with the north entrance then circling around the north court with a central circular landscaped planted area

    -         The massing and composition of the building with a series of five flat-roofed wings of one to four stories on a stepped plan extending from the central north- facing entrance core

    -         The elevations combine solid brick planes alternating with wall sections composed of a rhythmic sequence of narrow brick piers of 25' bays, extending from a half to four storey height, flanking black anodized window frames with glazed sections and spandrel panels

    -         The materials which are orange-brown toned brick of a smooth finish, black anodized door frames, window frames and spandrel panels, concrete stair cases with brick balustrades and dark metal coping at the eaves and sills and window glazing of solar bronze-tinted glass

    -         The north and east entrances feature recessed glazed entrances alternating doors with glazed panels

    Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Marie Greig, Administrator, North York Community Council, North York Civic Centre, Main floor, 5100 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario M2N 5V7, within thirty days of September 14, 2020, which is October 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

    • 1150 Eglinton Avenue East Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 2490-2506 Yonge Street

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 2490-2506 Yonge Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

    Reasons for Designation

    The Capitol Theatre Building

    The properties at 2490 Yonge Street (with entrance addresses at 2492-2504 Yonge Street) and 2506 Yonge Street (with entrance addresses at 2508 and 2510 Yonge Street) are worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value, and meet Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation, under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.

    Description

    Located on the northwest corner of Yonge Street and Castlefield Avenue, the properties at 2490-2506 Yonge Street (with additional entrance addresses) contain a three-storey complex that was initially completed in 1914 as the York Theatre and, following the addition in 1922 of a three-storey building with a new entrance to the theatre adjoined by commercial storefronts along Yonge Street, renamed the Capitol Theatre Building.  In the late 1990s, the theatre was converted to an event venue known as the Capitol Event Theatre.

    City Council included the properties at 2490 Yonge Street and 2506 Yonge Street (on the City of Toronto’s Heritage Register on November 9, 2016.

    Statement of Significance

    Covering half of the block on the west of Yonge Street, north of Castlefield Avenue, the Capitol Theatre Building has design value as a three-storey complex distinguished by its large scale and elegant proportions with architectural features from the early-20th century Classical Revival style.  Of particular note is the classical detailing on the Yonge Street elevation where the spandrels on the monumental two-storey round-arched window openings and the panels above the paired pilasters feature garland motifs.

    The associative value of the Capitol Theatre Building is linked to the role of the complex in the development of the main street character of Yonge Street in the 1920s after the annexation of the Town of North Toronto by the City of Toronto. The Capitol Theatre Building is one of the earliest complexes on the west side of Yonge Street, contributing to the formation of a streetwall. The properties contribute to the social history of the area as a local theatre serving the community since the World War I era and as an event venue beginning in the late 20th century.

    The Capitol Theatre Building is also valued for its connection to the notable Toronto architect Murray Brown, who was associated with the evolution of the building in the 1920s as it was converted from a combined silent movie and vaudeville theatre to a venue devoted to motion pictures with sound.  In solo practice after World War I, Murray Brown (1885-1958) was best known for projects that included Postal Station K (1936) on Yonge Street, south of the subject properties.  However, he designed several buildings for the Famous Players chain in Ontario, Saskatoon and Halifax, including two theatres in the Yonge-Eglinton area, with the Belsize Theatre (dating to 1927, renamed the Crest Theatre and now known as the Regent Theatre) on Mount Pleasant Road recognized on the City of Toronto’s Heritage Register.

    Contextually, the Capitol Theatre Building is valued for its contribution to the commercial main street character of Yonge Street north of Eglinton Avenue, particularly north of Roselawn Avenue, which began in the early-20th century and is typified by blocks of surviving two and three-storey commercial buildings.  The contextual value of the subject building is also related to its historical, visual and physical links to its surroundings on Yonge Street, where it is adjoined to the south, north and east by a collection of heritage properties recognized on the City's Heritage Register.  The Capitol Theatre Building is a local landmark in North Toronto, anchoring the northwest corner of Yonge Street and Castlefield Avenue with its chamfered corner, distinctive scale and decorative detailing.

    Heritage Attributes

    The heritage attributes of the Capitol Theatre Building located on the properties at 2490- 2506 Yonge Street (including entrance addresses) are:

    -         The setback, placement and orientation of the building on the northwest corner of Yonge Street and Castlefield Avenue

    -         The scale, form and massing of the three-storey building

    -         The materials, with the red brick cladding and the brick, stone and metal detailing

    -         The flat roofline with the stone band course and the metal (originally stone) cornice on the east elevation on Yonge Street, the southeast corner, and the two easternmost bays of the south side elevation on Castlefield Avenue

    -         The chamfered southeast corner adjoining Yonge Street and Castlefield Avenue with the stone quoins

    -         The principal (east) elevation on Yonge Street, which is organized into 15 bays, including two double-width bays (second from the south end and seventh from the north end)

    -         On the principal (east) elevation on Yonge Street, the first-floor storefronts, including the unit with the convenience address at 2504 Yonge Street that retains its vintage stainless-steel detailing, and the round-arched entrances at 2498 and 2510 Yonge Street (the storefronts and entrances have been altered over time)

    -         The theatre entrance and adjoining store (with convenience addresses at 2492 and 2494 Yonge Street), which are placed near the south end of the east elevation and feature a marquee, box office and entrances with glass and stainless-steel detailing dating to the mid-20th century

    -         The fenestration on the east elevation, the southeast corner and the two easternmost bays on the south side elevation, with the symmetrically placed flat-headed openings with the stone sills in the second and third stories

    -         On the east elevation, in the double-width bays, the single two-storey round-arched window openings, which are flanked by paired fluted pilasters, and the classical garland motifs in the spandrels and on the panels above the pilasters

    Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Marie Greig, Administrator, North York Community Council, North York Civic Centre, Main floor, 5100 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario M2N 5V7, within thirty days of September 14, 2020, which is October 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

    • 2490 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario
    • 2492 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario
    • 2504 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario
    • 2506 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Decision - 197 King Street East

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto on February 26, 2020, having considered an application to alter a structure designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act for 197 King Street East, decided among other things, to

    1. Approve the alterations to the heritage property at 197 King Street East,  in accordance with Section 33 of the Ontario Heritage Act, to allow for the rehabilitation of the existing building into an eight storey hotel (plus mechanical penthouse) on the lands known municipally in the year 2020 as 197 King Street East, with such alterations substantially in accordance with plans and drawings dated February 12, 2019 and revised September 30, 2019, prepared by Studio JCI, and on file with the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services; and the Heritage Impact Assessment, prepared by GBCA Architects, dated December 12, 2019, and on file with the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning, all subject to and in accordance with a Conservation Plan satisfactory to the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning, and subject to the following additional conditions:

    a. prior to the issuance of any permit for all or any part of the property at 197 King Street East, including a heritage permit or a building permit, but excluding permits for repairs and maintenance and usual and minor works for the existing heritage building as are acceptable to the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning, the Owner shall:

    1. enter into a Heritage Easement Agreement with the City for the property at 197 King Street East in accordance with the plans and drawings dated February 12, 2019 and revised September 30, 2019, prepared by Studio JCI, and on file with the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, the Heritage Impact Assessment prepared by GBCA Architects, dated December 12, 2019, and in accordance with the Conservation Plan required in Part 1.a.2 below, to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning, including registration of such agreement to the satisfaction of the City Solicitor;

    2. provide a detailed Conservation Plan, prepared by a qualified heritage consultant, that is consistent with the conservation strategy set out  in the Heritage Impact Assessment for 197 King Street East prepared by GBCA Architects, dated December 12, 2019, to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning;

    3. provide a Heritage Lighting Plan that describes how the exterior of the heritage property will be sensitively illuminated to enhance its heritage character to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning, and thereafter shall implement such Plan to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning;

    4. provide an Interpretation Plan for the subject property, to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services and afterward shall implement such Plan to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning;

    5. submit a Signage Plan to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning;

    6. provide building permit drawings, including notes and specifications for the conservation and protective measures keyed to the approved Conservation Plan required in Part 1.a.2 above, including a description of materials and finishes, to be prepared by the project architect and a qualified heritage consultant to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning; and

    7. provide a Letter of Credit, including provision for upwards indexing, in a form and amount and from a bank satisfactory to the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning, to secure all work included in the approved Conservation, Lighting, and Interpretation Plan;

    b. prior to the release of the Letter of Credit required in Part 1.a.7. above, the Owner shall:

    1. provide a letter of substantial completion prepared and signed by a qualified heritage consultant confirming that the required conservation work, the required interpretive work, and the required heritage lighting work has been completed in accordance with the Conservation Plan, Interpretation Plan and Heritage Lighting Plan, and that an appropriate standard of conservation has been maintained, all to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning; and

    2. provide replacement Heritage Easement Agreement photographs to the satisfaction of the Senior Manager, Heritage Preservation Services, Urban Design, City Planning.

    Appeal to the Conservation Review Board:
    The Ontario Heritage Act states that where a Council consents to an application to alter a designated property with certain terms or conditions, or refuses the application, the owner may, within thirty days after receipt of this notice, apply to the Council for a hearing before the Conservation Review Board.

    The owner may request a hearing before the Conservation Review Board in this matter, by writing to the City Clerk:  Attention Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, by 4.30 p.m. on or before October 14, 2020.

    • 197 King Street East Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Decision - 481 University Avenue (including 210 Dundas Street West)

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto on May 28, 2020, having considered Amendment to Conditions for Approved Alterations on August 25, 2014 to a Heritage Property, 481 University Avenue (including 210 Dundas Street West) a structure designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act, decided among other things, to:

    1. Amend its decision on Item 2014.TE34.30 by:

    a. deleting Part 1.d.ii. in its entirety; andb. amending Part 1.d.iii. by deleting the word "full" so that Part 1.d.iii. now reads:

    1.d. iii. Provide building permit drawings, including notes and specifications for the conservation and protective measures keyed to the approved Conservation Plan, including a description of materials and finishes to be prepared by the project architect, a qualified heritage consultant and a qualified art conservator, all to the satisfaction of the Manager, Heritage Preservation Services.

    Appeal to the Conservation Review Board:
    The Ontario Heritage Act states that where a Council consents to an application to alter a designated property with certain terms or conditions, or refuses the application, the owner may, within thirty days after receipt of this notice, apply to the Council for a hearing before the Conservation Review Board.

    The owner may request a hearing before the Conservation Review Board in this matter, by writing to the City Clerk:  Attention Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, West, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within 30 days of September 14, 2020, which is October 14, 2020.

    • 481 University Avenue Toronto Ontario
    • 210 Dundas Street West Toronto Ontario

    Naming of a public lane located west of Spadina Road, extending between Bantry Avenue and Heath Street West - "Irene Jaskulka Lane"

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    To consider a proposal to name a public lane west of Spadina Road, extending between Bantry Avenue and Heath Street West as "Irene Jaskulka Lane".                                                         

    The plan showing the lands to be affected may be seen in the City Clerk's Office, Secretariat, 2nd Floor, West Tower, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. At its meeting to be held in Committee Room 1, 2nd floor, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, on September 16, 2020, at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Toronto and East York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

    Notice to People writing or making presentations to the Toronto and East York Community Council:  The personal information contained in your correspondence to Toronto City Council or its committees is collected under the City of Toronto Act, 2006, and the City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27 – Council Procedures, section 27-21. Any personal information will become part of the public record and may be posted on the City's website, unless you expressly request the removal of personal identity information. Questions about the collection of this information may be directed to the City Clerk's office at 416-392-7033.

    Many Committee, Board and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view.  If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast.  Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.  Direct any questions about this collection to the City Clerk's Office at 416-392-7033.

    Due to the current state of emergency City Hall is closed.  The meeting will take place by video conference and streamed live online.  You can follow the meeting at www.youtube.com/TorontoCityCouncilLive.

    You are invited to make representations to Toronto and East York Community Council to make your views known regarding the proposal.

    To obtain additional information, submit comments or address the Toronto and East York Community Council meeting on September 16, 2020, please contact the following City official no later than 12:00 p.m. on September 15, 2020.

    Ms. Ellen Devlin

    Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council

    City Clerk’s Office

    Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

    2nd floor, West Tower

    Toronto, Ontario M5H 2N2

    E-mail: teycc@toronto.ca

    • Spadina Road & Heath Street West Toronto Ontario

    Naming of a public lane located north of Barton Avenue, extending between Pendrith Lane and Willowvale Lane - "Lampard Lane"

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    To consider a proposal to name a public lane north of Barton Avenue, extending between Pendrith Lane and Willowvale Lane as "Lampard Lane".

    The plan showing the lands to be affected may be seen in the City Clerk's Office, Secretariat, 2nd Floor, West Tower, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. At its meeting to be held in Committee Room 1, 2nd floor, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, on September 16, 2020, at 9:30 a.m., or shortly afterwards, the Toronto and East York Community Council will hear in person or by his or her counsel, agent or solicitor, any person who claims that his or her lands will be prejudicially affected by the naming and who applies to be heard with respect to the proposed naming.

    Notice to People writing or making presentations to the Toronto and East York Community Council:  The personal information contained in your correspondence to Toronto City Council or its committees is collected under the City of Toronto Act, 2006, and the City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27 – Council Procedures, section 27-21. Any personal information will become part of the public record and may be posted on the City's website, unless you expressly request the removal of personal identity information. Questions about the collection of this information may be directed to the City Clerk's office at 416-392-7033.

    Many Committee, Board and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view.  If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast.  Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.  Direct any questions about this collection to the City Clerk's Office at 416-392-7033.

    Due to the current state of emergency City Hall is closed.  The meeting will take place by video conference and streamed live online.  You can follow the meeting at www.youtube.com/TorontoCityCouncilLive.

    You are invited to make representations to Toronto and East York Community Council to make your views known regarding the proposal.

    To obtain additional information, submit comments or address the Toronto and East York Community Council meeting on September 16, 2020, please contact the following City official no later than 12:00 p.m. on September 15, 2020.

    Ms. Ellen Devlin

    Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council

    City Clerk’s Office

    Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

    2nd floor, West Tower

    Toronto, Ontario M5H 2N2

    Telephone: 416-392-7033; Fax: 416-397-0111

    E-mail: teycc@toronto.ca

    • Barton Avenue & Willowdale Lane Toronto Ontario

    Heritage Notices - June 29 and 30, 2020

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    At its meeting on June 29 and 30, 2020:

    City Council adopted the following:

    Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   582 King Street West.  See City Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines for the objection period to City Council’s notice of intention to designate a property is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the objection period to the notice of intention to designate a property will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve a notice of intention to designate a property pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

     

     

     

    • 582 King Street West Toronto Ontario

    Heritage Notices - February 26, 2020

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    At its meeting on February 26, 2020

    City Council adopted the following:

    Alterations to a property designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   197 King Street East. See City Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines, including such notice periods for which the City is subject to under the Ontario Heritage Act is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the notice period will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve the required notice pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

    • 197 King Street East Toronto Ontario

    Heritage Notices - May 28, 2020

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    At its meeting on May 28, 2020:

    City Council adopted the following:

    Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   2490-2506 Yonge Street.  See City Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines for the objection period to City Council’s notice of intention to designate a property is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the objection period to the notice of intention to designate a property will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve a notice of intention to designate a property pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

    Alterations to a property designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   481 University Avenue. See City Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines, including such notice periods for which the City is subject to under the Ontario Heritage Act is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the notice period will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve the required notice pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

    • 2490 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario
    • 2506 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario
    • 481 University Avenue Toronto Ontario

    Heritage Notices - July 28 and 29, 2020

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    At its meeting on July 28 and 29, 2020:

    City Council adopted the following:

    Intention Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   65 George Street.  See Council decision.

    -   501 Vesta Drive.   See Council decision.

    -   292 Main Street.  See Council decision.

    -   1150 Eglinton Avenue East.  See Council decision.

    -   64 Wellesley Street East.  See Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines for the objection period to City Council’s notice of intention to designate a property is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the objection period to the notice of intention to designate a property will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve a notice of intention to designate a property pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

    Amendment to Designating By-Law under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   206 Russell Hill Road.  See Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines for the objection period to City Council’s notice of intention to amend a designating by-law is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the objection period to the notice of intention to amend a designating by-law will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve a notice of intention to amend a designating by-law pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act. 

    Alterations to a property designated under Part V of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   129 Bedford Road.  See Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines, including such notice periods for which the City is subject to under the Ontario Heritage Act is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the notice period will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve the required notice pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

     

     

     

    • 65 George Street Toronto Ontario
    • 501 Vesta Drive Toronto Ontario
    • 292 Main Street Toronto Ontario
    • 1150 Eglinton Avenue East Toronto Ontario
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    Emergency Order No. 2 - To impose regulations requiring physical distancing within Nathan Phillip Square in the same manner as other Public Squares.

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    CITY OF TORONTO

     
    EMERGENCY ORDER No. 2
     

    To impose regulations requiring physical distancing within Nathan Phillip Square in the same manner as other Public Squares.
     

    WHEREAS under sections 7 and 8 of the City of Toronto Act, 2006 the City has broad authority to provide any service or thing the City considers necessary or desirable for the public and to pass by-laws in respect of the health, safety and well-being of persons and the economic, social and environmental well-being of the City; and

     

    WHEREAS City Council has enacted Chapter 59, Emergency Management, of the City of Toronto Municipal Code ("Chapter 59") with respect to numerous matters concerning the City's response to a situation or an impending situation that constitutes a danger of major proportions that could result in serious harm to persons or substantial damage to property and that is caused by the forces of nature, a disease, an accident or other health risk or an act whether intentional or otherwise; and

     

    WHEREAS under the specific powers and restrictions respecting delegation in sections 20 to 24, the City may delegate its powers and duties under the Act to an officer or employee of the City, as provided in section 21; and

     

    WHEREAS under section 59-6.1.A. of Chapter 59, City Council delegated its statutory authority under the City of Toronto Act, 2006, and under any other legislation, to the Mayor, exclusively for use in emergencies, subject to the specific restrictions and conditions imposed by Chapter 59, the Act, and otherwise; and

     

    WHEREAS COVID-19 is present within the City of Toronto, and COVID-19 is a disease that is readily communicable from person to person, carries a risk of serious complications such as pneumonia or kidney failure, and may result in death; and

     

    WHEREAS the spread of COVID-19 has been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization; and

     

    WHEREAS, on March 17, 2020, an emergency was declared, by means of Order in Council 518/2020 for purposes of s.7.1 of the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, due to the health risks to Ontario residents arising from COVID-19; and

     

    WHEREAS, on March 23, 2020 an emergency was declared by the head of council of the City of Toronto for purposes of s.4 of the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, and s.59-5.1 of Chapter 59 due to the risk to the health of the residents of the City of Toronto arising from spread of COVID-19 and its presence within the City of Toronto (the "Emergency"); and

     

    WHEREAS this order is based on the advice of the Medical Officer of Health, who has recommended physical distancing measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, including maintaining a distance of at least two metres from other individuals who are not members of the same household; and

     

    WHEREAS in accordance with section 59-6.1.B. of Chapter 59, I believe that it is necessary to utilize the delegated authority to make the following order to address the Emergency in a timely manner, and that the exercise of the delegated authority is a reasonable basis to alleviate harm or damage as a reasonable alternative to other measures to address the Emergency for the following reasons: due to the fact that COVID-19 is a disease that is readily communicable from person to person and that time is of the essence in implementing measures to address the spread of COVID-19, which makes implementation of these measures through other means impractical in the circumstances; and

     

    WHEREAS the City currently regulates and prohibits conduct on the specific City property known as Nathan Phillips Square under the regulations contained in the former City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 237, Nathan Phillips Square; and

     

    WHEREAS the City currently regulates and prohibits conduct on the other public squares of the City, through the provisions of City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 636, Public Squares, which includes in the listed prohibited conduct in these areas, a failure to maintain a distance of two metres from other individuals who are not members of their same household; and

     

    WHEREAS it is my opinion that the harm caused by COVID-19 will be best alleviated by having regulations concerning the failure to maintain a distance of two metres from other individuals who are not members of their same household, contained in as harmonized of a set of regulations as possible, I believe that Nathan Phillips Square should be included in the definition of Public Square for the purposes of being subject to the specific regulations prohibiting a failure to maintain a distance of two metres from other individuals who are not members of their same household which is applicable to all other public squares of the City.

     

    Therefore, I, John Tory, Mayor of the CITY OF TORONTO, enact by issuing of this Order, the following regulations with respect to the City of Toronto:

     

    1.         Chapter 636, Public Squares of the City of Toronto Municipal Code is amended to require compliance with physical distancing guidelines within the public square known as Nathan Phillips Square by:

     

    (a)        Adding the following as new subsection 636-22.A.(4) to the definition of Square for purposes of section 636-22:

     

    (4)        for purposes of subsection 636-22.C.1, “Nathan Phillips Square” as defined in former City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 237, Nathan Phillips Square.

     

    2.         The above amendment is revoked 30 days from the date of this order unless City Council authorizes an extension of the amendments.

     

    MAYOR JOHN TORY

     

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