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The City gives notice to the public on a variety of different matters, such as fees and charges, heritage designations, renaming of roads, and sale of property.

The City also gives notice through the newspaper, mail, or personal service, depending on legislation.

Current notices are listed below by date of posting. You can search for a current notice by word, phrase, topic, municipal ward, and/or date. You can also search past notices and access open data by clicking Search & Open Data.

Notice Date

2020-04-03

 

CITY OF TORONTO

 
EMERGENCY ORDER No. 2
 

To impose regulations requiring physical distancing within Nathan Phillip Square in the same manner as other Public Squares.
 

WHEREAS under sections 7 and 8 of the City of Toronto Act, 2006 the City has broad authority to provide any service or thing the City considers necessary or desirable for the public and to pass by-laws in respect of the health, safety and well-being of persons and the economic, social and environmental well-being of the City; and

 

WHEREAS City Council has enacted Chapter 59, Emergency Management, of the City of Toronto Municipal Code ("Chapter 59") with respect to numerous matters concerning the City's response to a situation or an impending situation that constitutes a danger of major proportions that could result in serious harm to persons or substantial damage to property and that is caused by the forces of nature, a disease, an accident or other health risk or an act whether intentional or otherwise; and

 

WHEREAS under the specific powers and restrictions respecting delegation in sections 20 to 24, the City may delegate its powers and duties under the Act to an officer or employee of the City, as provided in section 21; and

 

WHEREAS under section 59-6.1.A. of Chapter 59, City Council delegated its statutory authority under the City of Toronto Act, 2006, and under any other legislation, to the Mayor, exclusively for use in emergencies, subject to the specific restrictions and conditions imposed by Chapter 59, the Act, and otherwise; and

 

WHEREAS COVID-19 is present within the City of Toronto, and COVID-19 is a disease that is readily communicable from person to person, carries a risk of serious complications such as pneumonia or kidney failure, and may result in death; and

 

WHEREAS the spread of COVID-19 has been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization; and

 

WHEREAS, on March 17, 2020, an emergency was declared, by means of Order in Council 518/2020 for purposes of s.7.1 of the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, due to the health risks to Ontario residents arising from COVID-19; and

 

WHEREAS, on March 23, 2020 an emergency was declared by the head of council of the City of Toronto for purposes of s.4 of the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, and s.59-5.1 of Chapter 59 due to the risk to the health of the residents of the City of Toronto arising from spread of COVID-19 and its presence within the City of Toronto (the "Emergency"); and

 

WHEREAS this order is based on the advice of the Medical Officer of Health, who has recommended physical distancing measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, including maintaining a distance of at least two metres from other individuals who are not members of the same household; and

 

WHEREAS in accordance with section 59-6.1.B. of Chapter 59, I believe that it is necessary to utilize the delegated authority to make the following order to address the Emergency in a timely manner, and that the exercise of the delegated authority is a reasonable basis to alleviate harm or damage as a reasonable alternative to other measures to address the Emergency for the following reasons: due to the fact that COVID-19 is a disease that is readily communicable from person to person and that time is of the essence in implementing measures to address the spread of COVID-19, which makes implementation of these measures through other means impractical in the circumstances; and

 

WHEREAS the City currently regulates and prohibits conduct on the specific City property known as Nathan Phillips Square under the regulations contained in the former City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 237, Nathan Phillips Square; and

 

WHEREAS the City currently regulates and prohibits conduct on the other public squares of the City, through the provisions of City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 636, Public Squares, which includes in the listed prohibited conduct in these areas, a failure to maintain a distance of two metres from other individuals who are not members of their same household; and

 

WHEREAS it is my opinion that the harm caused by COVID-19 will be best alleviated by having regulations concerning the failure to maintain a distance of two metres from other individuals who are not members of their same household, contained in as harmonized of a set of regulations as possible, I believe that Nathan Phillips Square should be included in the definition of Public Square for the purposes of being subject to the specific regulations prohibiting a failure to maintain a distance of two metres from other individuals who are not members of their same household which is applicable to all other public squares of the City.

 

Therefore, I, John Tory, Mayor of the CITY OF TORONTO, enact by issuing of this Order, the following regulations with respect to the City of Toronto:

 

1.         Chapter 636, Public Squares of the City of Toronto Municipal Code is amended to require compliance with physical distancing guidelines within the public square known as Nathan Phillips Square by:

 

(a)        Adding the following as new subsection 636-22.A.(4) to the definition of Square for purposes of section 636-22:

 

(4)        for purposes of subsection 636-22.C.1, “Nathan Phillips Square” as defined in former City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 237, Nathan Phillips Square.

 

2.         The above amendment is revoked 30 days from the date of this order unless City Council authorizes an extension of the amendments.

 

MAYOR JOHN TORY

 

Notice Date

2020-04-02

CITY OF TORONTO

 
EMERGENCY ORDER No. 1
 

To impose regulations requiring physical distancing within Parks and Public Squares.
 

WHEREAS under sections 7 and 8 of the City of Toronto Act, 2006 the City has broad authority to provide any service or thing the City considers necessary or desirable for the public and to pass by-laws in respect of the health, safety and well-being of persons and the economic, social and environmental well-being of the City; and

 

WHEREAS City Council has enacted Chapter 59, Emergency Management, of the City of Toronto Municipal Code ("Chapter 59") with respect to numerous matters concerning the City's response to a situation or an impending situation that constitutes a danger of major proportions that could result in serious harm to persons or substantial damage to property and that is caused by the forces of nature, a disease, an accident or other health risk or an act whether intentional or otherwise; and

 

WHEREAS under the specific powers and restrictions respecting delegation in sections 20 to 24, the City may delegate its powers and duties under the Act to an officer or employee of the City, as provided in section 21; and

 

WHEREAS under section 59-6.1.A. of Chapter 59, City Council delegated its statutory authority under the City of Toronto Act, 2006, and under any other legislation, to the Mayor, exclusively for use in emergencies, subject to the specific restrictions and conditions imposed by Chapter 59, the Act, and otherwise; and

 

WHEREAS COVID-19 is present within the City of Toronto, and COVID-19 is a disease that is readily communicable from person to person, carries a risk of serious complications such as pneumonia or kidney failure, and may result in death; and

 

WHEREAS the spread of COVID-19 has been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization; and

 

WHEREAS, on March 17, 2020, an emergency was declared, by means of Order in Council 518/2020 for purposes of s.7.1 of the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, due to the health risks to Ontario residents arising from COVID-19; and

 

WHEREAS, on March 23, 2020 an emergency was declared by the head of council of the City of Toronto for purposes of s.4 of the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, and s.59-5.1 of Chapter 59 due to the risk to the health of the residents of the City of Toronto arising from spread of COVID-19 and its presence within the City of Toronto (the "Emergency"); and

 

WHEREAS this order is based on the advice of the Medical Officer of Health, who has recommended physical distancing measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, including maintaining a distance of at least two metres from other individuals who are not members of the same household; and

 

WHEREAS in accordance with section 59-6.1.B. of Chapter 59, I believe that it is necessary to utilize the delegated authority to make the following order to address the Emergency in a timely manner, and that the exercise of the delegated authority is a reasonable basis to alleviate harm or damage as a reasonable alternative to other measures to address the Emergency for the following reasons: due to the fact that COVID-19 is a disease that is readily communicable from person to person and that time is of the essence in implementing measures to address the spread of COVID-19, which makes implementation of these measures through other means impractical in the circumstances; and

 

WHEREAS the City currently regulates and prohibits specific conduct on City property such as parks, and public squares, which is undesirable, constitutes a nuisance, or presents health risks to other residents of the City of Toronto, it is my opinion that the harm caused by COVID-19 will be alleviated by adding to the list of prohibited conduct in these areas, a failure to maintain a distance of two metres from other individuals who are not members of their same household, which shall be enforceable in the same manner as other currently prohibited conduct.

 

Therefore, I, John Tory, Mayor of the CITY OF TORONTO, enact by issuing of this Order, the following regulations with respect to the City of Toronto:

 

1.         Chapter 608, Parks, of the City of Toronto Municipal Code is amended to require compliance with physical distancing guidelines by:

 

(a)        Adding the following new paragraph (1.1) to subsection 608-3.A which lists prohibited activities in a park:

 

 (1.1)    Remain, for longer than an incidental period, closer than 2 metres to any other person who is not a member of the same household;

 

(b)        Adding the following new section F to section 608-3 to exempt individuals providing services to the public from compliance with the physical distancing guidelines:

 

F.         Despite subsection A(1.1), a person who is a police officer, City employee, or a person hired or engaged by the City to do work or perform services within the park, may be within 2 metres of another person who is not a member of their household, for the specific purposes of providing policing, municipal, or enforcement services, including, but not limited to, the enforcement of this chapter, or the provisions of an act of Parliament or the Legislature, or an order made under an act of Parliament or the Legislature.

 

2.         Chapter 636, Public Squares of the City of Toronto Municipal Code is amended to require compliance with physical distancing guidelines by:

 

(a)        Adding the following new subsection C to section 636-11 which lists prohibited activities on Yonge-Dundas Square:

 

C.        Remain, for longer than a transient or incidental period, closer than two 2 metres to any other person who is not a member of the same household;

 

(b)        Adding the following new subsection C.1 to section 636-22 to except individuals providing services to the public from compliance with the physical distancing guidelines:

 

C.1.     With the exception of the police, City employees, or persons hired or engaged by the City to do work or perform services within a square, while performing policing, municipal, or enforcement services, including, but not limited to, the enforcement of this chapter, no person within a square shall remain, for longer than an incidental period, within 2 metres of any other person who are not a member of the same household.

 

(c)        Subsection 636-19.D. is deleted to remove the exclusion from the regulations establishing prohibited activities on Yonge-Dundas Square with respect to individuals engaged in location filming during a period and at a place as have been first approved in a permit issued by the City's Film Liaison with the approval of the Yonge-Dundas Square Board of Management.

 

4.         The above amendments are revoked 30 days from the date of this order unless City Council authorizes an extension of the amendments.

 

MAYOR JOHN TORY

Partial Repeal And Amendment Of Designating By-Law - 158 Sterling Avenue

Topic

  • Heritage > Amendment to the designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-03-20

Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to partially repeal and amend City of Toronto By-law 969-2005 (the "By-law") which designates the property at 158 Sterling Road (the "Property") under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.O.18 (the "Act") so that the By-law will no longer apply to a portion of the Property such that the legal description for the properties located at 20 Perth Avenue and 150,150R and 164 Sterling Road will be removed from the By-law.  Furthermore, Toronto City Council intends to amend the Reasons for Designation to update the cultural heritage values and attributes in accordance with Ontario Regulation 9/06 of the Act.

Reasons for the Partial Repeal

City of Toronto By-law 969-2005 was enacted on November 24, 2005.  The By-law designates the property at 158 Sterling Road under Part IV, Section 29 of the Act.  The property contains the heritage building known as the Northern Aluminum Company Building (the "Heritage Building"). The legal description currently includes the neighbouring properties municipally known as 20 Perth Avenue and 150,150R and 164 Sterling Road.

The property at 158 Sterling Road was legally severed into three parcels: the first parcel identified as 158 Sterling Road; the second parcel identified as 150, 150R and 164 Sterling Road; and the third parcel as 20 Perth Avenue by notice of decision issued October 13, 2015 and June 15, 2016. Following the severances, the heritage designation remained on title for all three properties. Therefore, it is necessary to partially repeal the By-law to remove the properties located at 20 Perth Avenue and 150,150R and 164 Sterling Road, which do not contain the Heritage Building. 

Amendment of the Designating By-law

By-law 969-2005 requires an amendment to revise the Reasons for Designation to update the cultural heritage values and attributes of the Property in accordance with Ontario Regulation 9/06 of the Act.

Notice of an objection to the proposed partial repeal and amendment of the designating by-law may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, ON M5H 2N2, within thirty days of the publication of this notice on the City's website, which is April 20, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

Amendment of Designating By-Law - 197 King Street East

Topic

  • Heritage > Amendment to the designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-03-20

Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to amend By-law 91-91, a by-law designating the property at 197 King Street East under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. O.18 (the "Act") to update and revise the Reasons for Designation to reflect the 2005 amendments to the Act.

Amendment of Designating By-law

Nealon House

City of Toronto By-law 91-91 designating the property at 197 King Street East under Part IV, Section 29 of the Act is revised to update the cultural heritage values and attributes in accordance with the 2005 amendments to the Act.  The property containing the building known historically as the Nealon House meets Ontario Regulation 9/06 of the Act, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation, under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.

Description

Located on the south side of the street between Frederick Street (east) and George Street (west), the property at 197 King Street East contains a four-storey commercial building that was constructed in 1888 as a hotel named the Nealon House after its owner, grocer James Nealon.  Following Nealon’s untimely death, the property was acquired in 1890 by Daniel and John Kennedy, who continued to operate the hotel.  The property remained in continuous use as a hotel and a tavern for nearly a century. 

The property at 197 King Street East was listed on the City of Toronto Inventory of Heritage Properties (now known as the Heritage Register) in 1984 and designated under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act in 1991 by By-law 91-91.  The property is identified as a contributing heritage property in the St. Lawrence Neighbourhood Heritage Conservation District, which is under appeal in 2019.

Statement of Significance

The property at 197 King Street East has cultural heritage value for its design as a well-crafted late-19th century commercial building with decorative detailing inspired by the most popular architectural styles of the late Victorian era.  The Nealon House draws upon the Romanesque Revival, Renaissance Revival and Italianate styles in a design that is distinguished by the decorative stone and brickwork, oversized bay window, elaborate cornice and distinctive corner tower.

The Nealon House is valued for its association with the development, evolution and significance of the St. Lawrence neighbourhood as it evolved from its origins as “Old Town,” survived the Great Fire of 1849 as the commercial and institutional heart of Toronto, and withstood the economic downturn of the area in the 20th century before it was revitalized in the 1960s.  Located within the original boundaries of the Town of York on the community’s “Main Street” where it replaced an earlier hotel and store, the Nealon House remained in continuous service as a hotel and a tavern for nearly a century.

Contextually, the property at 197 King Street East supports and maintains the historical character of the St. Lawrence Neighbourhood as it evolved in the 19th and 20th century from its origins as the Town of York to a mixed-use community highlighted by institutional landmarks that include St. James’ Cathedral, St. Lawrence Hall and the St. Lawrence Market.  The Nealon House is historically and visually linked to its setting within the original 10-block townsite established in 1793 and on Toronto’s original “Main Street” where it is part of the important collection of surviving 19th century commercial buildings on King Street East that are recognized on the City of Toronto’s Heritage Register.  With its scale, vintage and decorative features, the Nealon House complements the Christie, Brown and Company Biscuit Factory (1874 with subsequent additions) at 200 King Street East, opposite, which was restored and adaptively reused as George Brown College’s St. James Campus and designated under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the Nealon House at 197 King Street East are:

-  The setback, placement and orientation of the building on the south side of King Street East between Frederick (east) and George (west) streets

-  The scale, form and massing of the four-storey rectangular-shaped plan

-  The brick cladding with the brick, stone, terra cotta, wood and metal detailing

-  The roof, which is flat at the north end where the bracketed metal cornice marks the north end of the roof facing King Street East and the flat-roofed tower on the northwest corner has round-arched openings with decorative detailing (north and west) complementing the principal (north) elevation (the original lantern has been removed)

-  The principal (north) elevation facing King Street East, which is organized into four bays by brick pilasters with brick and stone detailing (the pilasters have been altered in the first storey)

-  On the north elevation, in the first (ground) storey, the main entrance, which is elevated in the second bay from the left (east) and contains a single wood door with glass inserts (the transom above the door and the adjoining storefront to the east and west have been altered), the secondary entrance in the left (east) bay with the wood door, and the open carriageway in the right (west) bay, which is flat-headed at the north end on King Street and round-arched at the south end

-  In the upper three stories of the north elevation, the flat-headed window openings, including the oversized recessed bay window that extends across the centre two bays, with the stone lintels and sills, the round-arched tympana over the fourth-storey openings incorporating terra cotta detailing (excluding the opening in the left or east bay), the spandrels with the basketweave brickwork in the fourth storey, the panels with the corbelled and decorative brickwork beneath all of the window openings, and the terra cotta panel with the caricature above the window opening in the fourth storey, left or east bay (some of the openings contain original wood windows)

-  On the rear (south) elevation, which is accessed through the carriageway, the round-arched window opening in the first storey (the east half of the south elevation is covered by the four-storey south wing)

The east and west side elevations are concealed by the neighbouring buildings, apart from the fourth storey with the remnants of painted signage.  The rear (south) elevation of the main building (apart from the first-storey round-arched opening) and the west and south elevations of the south wing have round-arched and flat-headed openings, some of which have been altered.

Notice of an objection to the proposed amendment of the designating by-law may be served on the City Clerk, Attention: Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, ON M5H 2N2, within thirty days of March 20, 2020 which is April 20, 2020 The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

Notice of Intention to Designate - 191, 193, 195 and 197 Church Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-03-13

Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 191, 193, 195 and 197 Church Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

191, 193 and 197 Church Street

Reasons for Designation

The properties at 191, 193 and 197 Church Street are worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value, and meet Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value. 

Description

Located on the east side of Church Street between Dundas Street East and Shuter Street in the Garden District neighbourhood and directly across the street from St. Michael's Cathedral, the Cooper & Gillespie Terrace is part of a group of three-storey Georgian style row houses that remain from the original ten-unit terrace completed in 1848. The current building at 195 Church Street was reconstructed in 1981 following the removal of the original structure due to fire in 1956. All four properties were included in the City of Toronto's inaugural list of properties added to the Inventory of Heritage Properties in 1973, including the then-vacant lot at 195 Church Street.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value  

The Cooper & Gillespie Terrace is valued as a rare example of urban row housing in Toronto completed before 1850. The Georgian styling, popular before the second half of the 19th century, signals some of the city’s earliest buildings. While this type and style of building was once prevalent in downtown Toronto, the Cooper & Gillespie Terrace is valued as a rare surviving example that is also considered to be the city's best preserved set of Georgian row houses.

The Cooper & Gillespie Terrace is valued for its association with architect John Tully, who is attributed to the design. Tully is recognized as one of the first professional architects to work in Toronto, where only a small number of his commissions survive, including the nearby designated properties at 68-70 Shuter Street (Edward Cooper Houses). Like the Shuter Street properties, 195 and 197 Church Street were originally owned by local merchant and speculative developer, Edward Cooper.

The Cooper & Gillespie Terrace has contextual value as its scale, setback and style are visually and physically linked to the Garden District neighbourhood where it defines the remaining portion of the original ten-unit brick terrace and, more broadly, the mid-19th century residential character of Church Street and the surrounding area. Within the context of a neighbourhood in flux due to ongoing development pressure, the Cooper & Gillespie Terrace is valued together as a group of row houses with historic, physical and visual links to its surroundings for over 170 years.

The Cooper & Gillespie Terrace is highlighted by the current infill replacement building at 195 Church Street, constructed in 1981 as a compatible replacement that re-establishes the unity of the historic row.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the Cooper & Gillespie Terrace are:

   - The setback, placement and orientation of the buildings on the east side of the street between Shuter Street and Dundas Street East  

   - The scale, form and massing of the red brick terrace with its three storey height with pitched roofs, chimneys and corbelled brick firebreak end walls defining the individual properties

   - The materials with the red and buff brick, and the brick, stone and wood detailing

   - The principal (west) elevations, which are symmetrically organized with entrances located in the left (north) bays and flat-headed window openings with stone lintels and sills in all three storeys

   - The fenestration with the double-hung sash windows, including the six-over-six panes, where existing

   - The entries, which are recessed and have flat-headed door openings with transoms beneath stone lintels

   - The decorative, polychrome brickwork with the buff brick stringcourses at all the levels, the vertical quoining delineating individual properties in the row and coffered panel brick frieze below the rooflines

195 Church Street

Reasons for Designation

The property at 195 Church Street is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value. 

Description

Located on the east side of Church Street between Dundas Street East and Shuter Street in the Garden District neighbourhood and directly across the street from St. Michael's Cathedral, the property at 195 Church Street is part of a group of four three-storey Georgian style row houses that remain from the original ten-unit terrace completed in 1848. The current building at 195 Church Street was reconstructed in 1981 by Mekinda, Snyder & Weis Architects in a compatible manner to the rest of the surviving row, following the removal of the original structure in 1956. All four properties were included in the City of Toronto's inaugural list of properties added to the Inventory of Heritage Properties in 1973, including the then-vacant lot at 195 Church Street.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

The property at 195 Church Street is valued as a significant example of compatible urban infill within the Cooper & Gillespie Terrace which is valued as a rare example of urban row housing originally completed before 1850. The current replacement building at 195 Church Street (1981) represents the influence of prevailing heritage conservation theory in the latter half of the 20th century, when architects, preservationists and planners were exploring new ways of repairing lost or damaged urban fabric in order to re-establish the cultural significance of a site.

The principal (west) elevation refers to the historic row's Georgian styling, which was popular before the second half of the 19th century and signals some of Toronto's earliest buildings. This reinterpretation also respects the form, articulation and materiality of the rest of the row, and supports the prevailing streetscape character while incorporating identifiably contemporary interpretations of historic features, such as the corbelling above the first and third storey openings, the recessed entrance and third floor balcony, an at-grade second entrance and the omission of a cornice. These small design gestures make evident the contemporary date of construction in contrast to the rest of the Cooper & Gillespie Terrace, but do so without disrupting the pedestrian scale, rhythm of openings, prevailing materiality and articulation of the streetscape.

Cooper & Gillespie Terrace is valued as a rare surviving example of a collection of Georgian row houses, considered to be the city's best preserved set and highlighted by the current infill replacement building at 195 Church Street.

The Cooper & Gillespie Terrace has contextual value as its scale, setback and style are visually and physically linked to the Garden District neighbourhood where it defines the remaining portion of the original ten-unit brick terrace and, more broadly, the mid-19th century residential character of Church Street and the surrounding area.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the property at 195 Church Street are:

   - The setback, placement and orientation of the buildings on the east side of the street between Shuter Street and Dundas Street East

   - The scale, form and massing of the red brick row house with its three storey height and flat roof

   - The materials with the red brick, and the brick and stone detailing

   - The principal (west) elevation, which is symmetrically organized with the recessed entrance located in the left (north) bay and flat-headed window openings

   - The decorative brickwork with the corbelled headers above the openings oat the first and third storeys, and the coffered panel brick frieze below the roofline

Notice of an objection to the proposed designations may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of March 13, 2020, which is April 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection and all relevant facts.

Notice of Intention to Designate - 41 Wabash Avenue

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-03-13

Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and building known municipally as 41 Wabash Avenue under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

The property at 41 Wabash Avenue is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design-physical, historical-associative and contextual value.

National Equipment Company Ltd

Description

Located on the south side of Wabash Avenue, east of Sorauren Avenue, the property at 41 Wabash Avenue is a two-and-a-half storey rectangular-plan, brick-clad volume constructed for the National Equipment Company Ltd. in 1912 in the Roncesvalles neighbourhood. 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

The building, originally known as the National Equipment Company Ltd. and more recently known as J. S. Addison Plumbing, has physical and design value as a representative of an early twentieth-century, industrial warehouse typology.  This is evident in its location on the north edge of the property with no set back, the simple block massing, brick cladding and regular distribution of window openings which is interrupted to accommodate functional requirements such as loading bays and entrances.  Although an industrial form, the building has architectural refinement in the raising of the parapet into a broad pediment on its principal (north) elevation facing Wabash Avenue and in the arrangement of the window openings in a classical manner which features hierarchy and symmetry presented in the double width of the central window aligned with the pediment and flanked by two windows, half its width on either side at both upper levels. 

The building has historic value as it is associated with the industrial development of area which was encouraged by location of the railways to the east of this section of the Roncesvalles neighbourhood.  The purchase and development of the property at 41 Wabash Avenue in 1911 by the National Equipment Company followed several other industries which located between Sorauren Avenue and the railway line in the triangular area just south of Dundas Street West including the Canada Linseed Oil Mills Ltd on the north side of Wabash Avenue. These industries provided employment for the Roncesvalles neighbourhood to the west and south and to Brockton village to the east.

Contextually, with its century-old materials, composition and form, this industrial block has heritage value as it maintains the industrial character of this eastern section of the historic Roncesvalles neighbourhood. Located to the south-east of Dundas Street West and the railway lines, the neighbourhood has had a continuous mix of low-rise industrial and residential buildings for over 110 years.  The addition of Sorauren Park and the smaller Charles G. Williams Park has added important amenity to the area which will be enhanced by the adaptive re-use of the Canada Linseed Oil building on the north side of Wabash Avenue as a community centre.  The integration of heritage and its adaptive re-use will build on and enhance the richness and variety of the sense of place in this historic and evolving neighbourhood.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the property at 41 Wabash Avenue are:

   -  The setback, placement and orientation of the industrial warehouse building on the south side of Wabash Avenue 

   -  The scale, form and massing of the two-and-a-half-storey building including the raised parapet with it gable form on the north elevation

   -  The materials including the brick cladding, the stone lintels over the loading bays, the bush-hammered stone sills, the stone blocks set as the top masonry course beneath the top of the windows on the north elevation, and projecting wood window hoods over the second storey windows on the north elevation

    -  On the north elevation the arrangement of openings including the wide window openings flanked by two narrower windows at the upper levels, the door at grade and the adjacent opening presumably originally used for loading and now filled in with blocks

    -  On the west elevation, at all three levels, the three pairs of long narrow window openings with segmental-arched headers towards the south end (one of the openings has been extended to floor level) and the loading dock opening at the lower level at the north end (filled in) with a single narrow, segmental-arched headed opening above at the upper level

   -  The brick clad east elevation and remaining visible window openings

The rear, metal-clad, single-storey addition is not included in the heritage attributes.  The south elevation is not included in the heritage attributes as it has been overclad in metal siding.  

Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of March 13, 2020, which is April 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

 

Notice of Intention to Designate - 305 King Street West

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-03-13

Take notice that Toronto City Council stated its intention to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 305 King Street West (including entrance addresses at 309 and 311 King Street West) under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

Reasons for Designation

The property at 305 King Street West (including the entrance addresses at 309 and 311 King Street West) is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three categories of design, associative and contextual value.

Description

Located on the south side of the street between John Street and Blue Jays Way, the property at 305 King Street West contains a two-storey commercial building that was completed in 1928.  The King Building replaced part of a three-storey commercial row built in 1887. The current building is attributed to architect Thomas Elliott Muirhead in his position as staff architect for the John G. Kent Construction Company, which acquired the site in 1923.  Five years later, Kent’s estate sold the property to the King Investment Company under the direction of Myrtle Warren, and the initial tenants included the Carter Radio Company and the Utah Radio Products Company headed by the new owner.  From 1930 until 1956, the property was owned by Harry V. Mallabar (sic), who expanded the subject building and acquired the neighbouring properties for his Malabar Costumes Company (now Malabar Limited).  The property at 305 King Street West was identified as a contributing heritage property in the King-Spadina Heritage Conservation District Plan, which was adopted by City Council in 2017 when the King Building was listed on the City of Toronto’s Heritage Register.

Statement of Significance

The property at 305 King Street West has cultural heritage value as a representative example of an early 20th century commercial building with the symmetry and the cornice with brackets inspired by Edwardian Classicism, the most popular style for most typologies in the first quarter of the 20th century.  Introduced to a streetscape that was originally developed with residential row houses (Hughes Terrace) in the 1850s, followed by commercial storefronts in the 1880s, the King Building was a compatible addition to the block in the 1920s with its setback, cladding and detailing.

The associative value of the King Building is through its contribution to the evolution of the King-Spadina community, which began in the 19th century as an institutional and residential enclave and was transformed after the Great Fire of 1900 into Toronto’s industrial centre.  During the latter period, many of the original buildings were replaced with new edifices, including the subject site where part of a former commercial row became the location of the King Building.

The property at 305 King Street West is also valued for its historical association with John G. (Gowans) Kent, owner of the construction company that developed the site, and his staff architect Thomas Elliott Muirhead, to which its design is attributed.  As the son of the founder of Gowans, Kent and Company, John G. Kent (1861-1927) worked for the noted Toronto glassware firm prior to establishing a construction company with his son, Henry (Harry) Gowans Kent in the early 1920s.  Apart from his business interests, which included his role as president of the Toronto Board of Trade, Kent gained prominence as the managing director of the Canadian National Exhibition (1920-27) and, in that capacity, was the first Canadian to head the American Association of Fairs and Exhibitions.  Thomas Elliott Muirhead (1890-1961) is best known for his role as the architect for the John G. Kent Construction Company.  With few extant projects remaining in Toronto, the Kenson Apartments (1927) at 51 Grosvenor Street and the National Cast Register Company Building (1935) at 222 Lansdowne Avenue are other recognized heritage properties designed by Muirhead.

The King Building is also linked to Toronto’s famed Malabar Costumes Company (now known as Malabar Limited), which acquired the property in 1930 and expanded and occupied the premises until 1956.  Founded in Winnipeg in the early 20th century, Henry V. Mallabar (sic) opened the enterprise’s Toronto branch in 1923 where the company manufactured and rented costumes to clients ranging from individuals to both amateur and professional companies across North America.  In its King Street location, Malabar Limited unveiled its renowned opera department and, by 1950, described itself as “the leading costume house in Canada, providing costumes for theatrical/musical productions and masquerade galas.”

Contextually, the property at 305 King Street West supports the historical character of the King-Spadina neighbourhood as it evolved from its origins in the 1800s as an institutional and residential enclave to the city’s manufacturing century during the first half of the 20th century.  The King Building contributes to the surviving collection of recognized heritage buildings from all phases of the development of King-Spadina.  With its location on the south side of King Street between John Street and Blue Jays Way (originally Peter Street), the King Building is part of an important block that includes Hughes Terrace (former residential buildings dating to the 1850s), the Westinghouse Building (a warehouse constructed in two phases between 1927 and 1935), and a collection of late-19th century commercial buildings that are designated under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for their cultural heritage value.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the King Building at 305 King Street West are:

   - The placement, setback and orientation of the building on the south side of King Street West between John Street and Blue Jays Way

   - The scale, form and massing of the two-storey rectangular-shaped plan

   - The materials, with the brick cladding and the brick, stone and metal detailing

   - The flat roofline with the cornice with the corbelled brackets on the north elevation facing the street

   - The principal (north) elevation where the first (ground) floor storefront has stone detailing (the openings have been altered)

   - On the north elevation, the second storey with the three window openings (the centre opening is larger) with the stone sills and the brick flat arches
Note: the east side elevation, which is viewed from King Street West, has flat-headed window openings.  The west side elevation adjoins the neighbouring building at 315 King Street.  The rear (south) elevation and wings are not identified as heritage attributes.
Notice of an objection to the proposed designation may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of March 13, 2020, which is April 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

    Total Records Found: 7

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