Public Notice

Welcome to the City of Toronto's Public Notice website.

The City gives notice to the public on a variety of different matters, such as fees and charges, heritage designations, renaming of roads, and sale of property.

The City also gives notice through the newspaper, mail, or personal service, depending on legislation.

Current notices are listed below by date of posting. You can search for a current notice by word, phrase, topic, municipal ward, and/or date. You can also search past notices and access open data by clicking Search & Open Data.

Current Notices

Current Notices

Amendments to the Municipal Code: Chapter 441, Fees and Charges and Chapter 442, Fees and Charges, Administration of

Topic

  • Licensing > Proposal to amend the Municipal Code
  • Licensing > Proposal to change user fees and charges

Notice Date

2020-12-01

RentSafeTO (Apartment Building Standards): Colour-coded Rating System, By-law Amendments, and Program Updates

Topic

  • Licensing > Proposal to amend the Municipal Code
  • Licensing > Proposal to change user fees and charges

Notice Date

2020-12-01

Declaration of Surplus Properties

Topic

  • Sale of City Property/Real Estate > Proposed sale of City property

Notice Date

2020-11-25

Notice of Passing of By-law 935-2020 – 292 Main Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-11-24

Notice of Passing of By-law 936-2020 - 440 Unwin Avenue

Topic

  • Heritage > Designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-11-24

Notice of Passing of By-law 930-2020 – 206 Russell Hill Road

Topic

  • Heritage > Designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-11-24

Notice of Passing of By-law 929-2020 – 260 King Street East

Topic

  • Heritage > Designation of a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-11-24

Further Updates to Chapter 545, Licensing - Payday Loan Establishments

Topic

  • Licensing > Proposal to amend the Municipal Code

Notice Date

2020-11-17

City's Residential Retrofit Program

Topic

  • Financial > Special charges for City's Residential Retrofit Program

Notice Date

2020-11-13

Notice of Intention to Designate - 80 and 84 Queen's Park

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-11-12

Notice of Intention to Designate - 2100 and 2106 Yonge Street

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-11-12

Notice of Intention to Designate - 578 King Street West

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-11-12

Notice Date

2020-11-09

2021 Rate Supported Budgets – Solid Waste Management Services and Recommended 2021 Solid Waste Rates and Fees

Topic

  • Licensing > Proposal to amend the Municipal Code
  • Licensing > Proposal to change user fees and charges

Notice Date

2020-11-06

Heritage Notices - June 29 and 30, 2020

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-08-07

Heritage Notices - February 26, 2020

Topic

  • Heritage > Decision on alteration to a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-08-07

Heritage Notices - May 28, 2020

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property
  • Heritage > Decision on alteration to a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-08-07

Heritage Notices - July 28 and 29, 2020

Topic

  • Heritage > Intention to designate a heritage property
  • Heritage > Amendment to the designation of a heritage property
  • Heritage > Decision on alteration to a heritage property

Notice Date

2020-08-07

    Total Records Found: 23

    Legend

    This extract of Notices is published for reference convenience. Only those Notices that have an address or location focus are listed. Please refer to the list of notices for complete list of current or archived notices.

    Mapped Notices

    Declaration of Surplus Properties

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    NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with the City of Toronto’s real estate disposal by-law, the following properties were declared surplus:

    1.         On July 28 and 29, 2020, the City-owned property at 25 Bellevue Avenue in Kensington Market, currently operated by the Toronto Parking Authority as Carpark 71 was declared surplus, with the intended manner of disposal to be way of a long-term lease to a non-profit organization to be selected through a competitive process for affordable housing purposes.

    2.         On November 3, 2020, the land located at 105 Spadina Avenue and 363 Adelaide Street West, being Part of Lot 7 and Lot 8 on Plan D160 and Part of Lots, 5, 7, 26 and 29, Lots 6, 27 and 28 on Plan D160, was declared surplus. The land has an area of approximately 1,245.4 sq. m.  The intended manner of disposal is to be by way of the invitation of an offer to purchase the property from the abutting owner(s) of 101 Spadina Avenue, for incorporation into a new mixed-use development which will include a TPA underground public parking facility and a new City park.

    3.         On November 12, 2020, two heritage freight elevator shafts located at Union Station at 71 Front Street West, legally described as Part of Lot 9 on D-970 and Part of Lot 4 on Plan 12164, being Part of PIN 21395-0019 (LT) and part of PIN 21396-­­0141(LT), respectively, and designated as Parts 1 and  2 on attached Plan 66R-31515, were declared surplus.  The intended manner of disposal is to be by way of an invitation of an offer to purchase the Elevator Shafts from Metrolinx.

    The following City official has information about the proposed dispositions: Ms. Melanie Hale-Carter, Tel: 647-458-7376, Metro Hall, 55 John Street, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario M5V 3C6. Enquiries may be made of the said official until the 9th of December, 2020.

    • 25 Bellevue Avenue Toronto Ontario
    • Spadina Avenue & Adelaide Street West Toronto Ontario
    • 71 Front Street West Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 935-2020 – 292 Main Street

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 935-2020 to designate 292 Main Street (Beaches-East York, Ward 19) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 292 Main Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 936-2020 - 440 Unwin Avenue

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 936-2020 to designate 440 Unwin Avenue (Toronto-Danforth, Ward 14) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 440 Unwin Avenue Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 930-2020 – 206 Russell Hill Road

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 930-2020 to designate 206 Russell Hill Road (Toronto-St. Paul's, Ward 12) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 206 Russell Hill Road Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Passing of By-law 929-2020 – 260 King Street East

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    Take notice that the Council of the City of Toronto has passed By-law 929-2020 to designate 260 King Street East (Toronto Centre, Ward 13) as being of cultural heritage value or interest.

    • 260 King Street East Toronto Ontario

    City's Residential Retrofit Program

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    Individual By-laws for each of the benefitting properties listed below have been enacted for the meeting of City Council held on October 27, 28 and 30, 2020. Review by-law details.

    Each of these By-laws imposes a special charge on each of the corresponding benefitting properties as a result of the property having entered into a Property Owner Agreement with the City and having undertaken energy efficiency and/or water conservation works as local improvements under the Residential Retrofit Program authorized by Executive Committee Item EX33.22, as adopted by Council on July 16, 17, 18 and 19, 2013 and enacted in By-law 1105-2013 (July 19, 2013).

    The benefitting properties are:

    -         15-17 Glengrove Avenue East

    -         401 Woodfield Road

    • 15 Glengrove Avenue East Toronto Ontario
    • 17 Glengrove Avenue East Toronto Ontario
    • 401 Woodfield Road Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 80 and 84 Queen's Park

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 80 and 84 Queen's Park under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

    80 Queen's Park - The Edward Johnson Building

    Reasons for Designation

    The property 80 Queen's Park is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three criteria of design and physical, historical and associative, and contextual values.

    Description

    The property at 80 Queen's Park contains the Edward Johnson building which was constructed in 1960-1961 to house the University of Toronto's Faculty of Music.  The five-storey brick and concrete building, which was designed by one of Canada's leading Modernist firms, Gordon S. Adamson Associates architects is representative of Late Modernism.  Situated behind Wymilwood (later known as Falconer Hall) on the edge of the bank overlooking the former Taddle Creek Ravine, the building faces Queen's Park and the lower level Philosophers Walk.  Named for Edward Johnson, a tenor at the New York Metropolitan Opera and Board Member, it contains two concert halls, one for opera with the requisite fly tower and named for Sir Ernest MacMillan, the renowned composer and Dean of the Faculty of Music (1927-1952) and a chamber hall, known as Walter Hall.  The building was extended in 1988 by Moffatt, Kinoshita and Associates Inc. with a double-storey underground music library whose western elevation opens to Philosopher's Walk.

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Design and Physical Value

    The Edward Johnson Faculty of Music Building has design and physical value as a very fine representative of the Late Modernism style which is expressed in its integration and reinterpretation of traditional and modern elements and its response to context and landscape.  The building is designed to sit on a raised podium and features a double-storey colonnade, which is set before a curtain wall façade, surrounds the building on its principal three facades, and is evocative of a historic classical archetype used to distinguish important public buildings. Above the colonnade, the traditional pediment is replaced by a brick clad cruciform volume, originally containing the library, cantilevering over the colonnade with windows in its base. The modernist form-follows-function motto is present in the frank expression of the opera hall's fly tower on the northern end of the building and the combination of concrete with a textured surface and brick is characteristic of the humanism that infused Post-World War II Modernism.  The colonnade responds to the context of the adjacent historic Flavelle House with its portico of double-storey columns.  The darker red brick with the light-coloured concrete corresponds to the brick and stone cladding of both Flavelle House and Wymilwood (Falconer Hall).  Located on the edge of the Taddle Creek ravine, the building design responds to the context as it extends its base two-storeys down providing a secondary entrance accessed by a bridge traversing the former river bed connects with Philosopher's Walk and provides a pedestrian route to Royal Conservatory of Music on Bloor Street West.  The 1988 addition, concealed beneath the lawn between the Edward Johnson Building and the Faculty of Law and Flavelle House continued this approach in its respect for existing context and in its relationship with the ravine and Philosophers' Walk as a flanked of sloping glazing permits views to the ravine and light to the lower levels of the music library.

    The interior of the Edward Johnson Building has design and physical value which is evident in its double volume, brick-clad and concrete detailed lobby, lit by two monumental skylights as well as in the chamber music venue, Walter Hall which is considered to be one of "Toronto's finest small auditoriums."[1]   

    Historical and Associative Value

    The Edward Johnson Building has historic and associative value as it is named for and associated with Edward Johnson (1878-1959) a Canadian opera tenor who was the lead tenor at the world-renowned La Scala in Milan (1912-1917) before joining the Metropolitan Opera in New York (1922-1935) where he later acted as the General Manager of the Opera (1935-1950) Johnson also served on the University of Toronto's Board of Governors and as the Chairman of the Board of the Royal Conservatory of Music. 

    The opera hall in the building is also associated with Sir Ernest MacMillan (1893-1970) "one of the major figures in Canada's musical history, Macmillan influenced virtually all facets of the country's musical life both by his precocity and by his tireless activities on behalf of education."  As well as being a child prodigy organ player and composer with a D MUS from Oxford, from 1927-1952 MacMillan was Dean of the Faculty of Music, served as Principal of the Toronto Conservatory of Music, was the conductor of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Mendelsohn Choir. He founded the Canadian Music Council, the Canadian Music Centre and was a founding member of the Canada Council. He was knighted in 1935 and became a Companion of the Order of Canada in 1970.

    The second concert hall for chamber music is associated with Arnold Walter (1902-1973), a "visionary and influential leader of music education"[2] who brought the Faculty of Music international renown and established one of the most comprehensive music libraries in North America. He became a Companion of the Order of Canada in 1971.

    The building is the first dedicated faculty of music building in Canada.  It is associated with the University of Toronto and the Faculty of Music which was founded by the University in 1843 and has in partnership with the Royal Conservatory of Music been instrumental in the teaching of music as well as the promotion of its appreciation and the nurturing of many great talents.  It was the first Canadian university to establish a musicology department in 1954, was the second school in North America to have an electronic recording studio established in 1959, promoted ethnomusicology in the 1970s and from the 1950s, through the UofT Press, published extensively on Canadian music.  The music library contains the largest music research collection in Canada.

    The Edward Johnson Building is valued as it is associated with the important Canadian architectural practise known as Gordon Adamson and Associates (now Adamson Associates) which was founded in 1946 by Gordon Sinclair Adamson (1904-1986) and is credited with advancing Canadian modernism after World War II.  The practise undertook a wide range of building types including the Savoy Plaza mid-rise apartment block (1951, Massey Medal recipient), the Redpath Sugar Refinery (1957, listed on the City's Heritage Inventory) and the E J Pratt Library at Victoria College, University of Toronto, (1960, OAA winner of 25-year Award in 1996) as well as numerous commercial buildings in Toronto and institutional buildings across the province.   Following Adamson's retirement in 1971 the practice continued to expand and grow with large projects in Toronto including Toronto Pearson International Airport redevelopment, Medical and Related Sciences (MaRS) Centre as well as commissions in partnership with internationally renowned practices in New York, London, Kuala Lumpur for which the firm has received multiple awards including one for the record-breaking Petronas Towers, the 2004 recipient of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture).  The Edward Johnson Building is representative of a mature phase in the development of the firm's body of work as it combines the influences of post-war modernism evident in the work of Le Corbusier and Alvar Aalto in a fitting design for a high-profile university faculty building with two public performance spaces, that responds sensitively to historic and landscape contexts. 

    Contextual Value

    The Edward Johnson Building has contextual value as it defines and supports the character of this north section of the University Grounds facing Queen's Park which reflect 130 years of evolving character and development.  Originally subdivided for development with grand residential estates, the area flanking the east and west sides of Queen's Park from the 1890s began to include university buildings, such as Victoria College, 1892, and institutional buildings such as the Royal Ontario Museum from 1913 alongside the residential estate buildings constructed in 1901-2 like Flavelle House and Wymilwood which were later adapted for university uses. The Edward Johnson Building represents the increased development of the area in the 1950s and 1960s with the first addition to Flavelle House for the Faculty of Law and of institutional buildings such as the McLaughlin Planetarium (1966-8) and the Gardiner Museum (1984).  Its form and massing support the low-rise character of the adjacent residential and institutional buildings. 

    The Edward Johnson Building is physically, functionally, visually and historically linked to its surroundings. Its physical link is evident in its location behind the two grand estate houses of Flavelle House and Wymilwood as it sits on the edge of the Taddle Creek ravine and extends down into the valley.  Functionally, it contributes to the cultural character of the area as it is both a performance centre with its opera hall and chamber hall as well as being educational as the university's Faculty of Music. Visually it is linked to its surroundings as its low-rise form complements the adjacent buildings.  Its modernist style represents the 1960s, a significant period in the growth and development of this north section of Queen's Park while its materials and details such as the colonnade and dark red brick are complementary to the adjacent historic estate houses of Flavelle House and Wymilwood. With its lower level access to and bridge across the Taddle Creek Ravine to Philosopher's Walk and its pedestrian link to the Royal Conservatory of Music, the building enhances one of the great natural landscapes of the university campus.  As part of the 130 year evolution of this area, it is historically linked to its surroundings. 

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    The following attributes contribute to the value of the property at 80 Queen's Park as a representative of the Late Modern style:

    -         The form and massing of the building which includes:

    -   the two-storey colonnaded volume on a raised base

    -   the cruciform attic storey cantilevering over the colonnade with the canted angle with glazing at its base

    -   the fly tower

    -   the two storey, below-ground levels which are revealed on the west façade and connect the building to Philosopher's Walk with a bridge

    -         The south, east and west facades which combine:

    -   the double-storey colonnade of concrete piers on the three principal elevations,

    -   the curtain wall glazing

    -   the podium and lower levels clad in textured concrete panels

    -   the red brick which clads the fifth-storey, attic volume and the fly tower.

    -   the concrete beams and adjacent glazing which are exposed beneath the slab of the colonnade

    -   the asymmetrical location of the principal entrance in the east facade

    -         The design of the double-volume lobby which includes :

    -   full-height, single-storey glazing at the east and west ends

    -   access to the staircase leading to the secondary lower entrance from Philosopher's Walk

    -   brick-lined walls with patterned brick at the upper levels of both the east and west ends

    -   concrete columns, lintels and handrails

    -   the balcony

    -   two circular skylights

    Contextual Value

    The following attributes contribute to the contextual value of the property at 80 Queen's Park as its 1960s Late Modern style complements the adjacent educational and cultural institutions and contributes to the variety of periods and architectural styles expressed in the buildings on both the west and east sides of Queen's Park, as well as responding to the landscape of the Taddle Creek Ravine, and its combination of red brick and light coloured concrete which complement the materials of the historic Flavelle House and Falconer Hall:

    -   The location on the north section of the UofT Campus on the west side of Queen's Park and overlooking the Taddle Creek Ravine and Philosopher's Walk

    -   The placement of the building so that it is viewed between Flavelle House, 78 Queen's Park and Falconer Hall, 84 Queen's Park, from Queen's Park

    -   The three-to-five storey massing and the double-storey colonnades on the east, south and west facades

    -   The east entry facade

    -   The south facade

    -   The area of lawn in front of the south facade

    -   The west elevation extending down an additional two stories below the colonnade

    -   The western entrance, at the lower level, opening to a bridge which connects to Philosopher's Walk

    84 Queen's Park – Wymilwood (Falconer Hall)

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 84 Queen's Park, containing the house known as Wymilwood and later as Falconer Hall, is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three criteria of design and physical, historical and associative, and contextual values.

    Description

    Wymilwood, later known as Falconer Hall, was built in 1902-3 on the west side of Queen's Park, on land leased from the University of Toronto, by the financier and philanthropist, Edward Rogers Wood.  Designed by the architects Sproatt & Rolph, the two-and-half-storey house, on a raised basement, clad in red brick with stone trim, is representative of the Arts and Crafts manner of domestic architecture with its asymmetrical massing, multiple gable roofs, bay windows and prominent clusters of chimneys.  The interiors are noteworthy for their finely designed and detailed rooms and for murals attributed to Gustav Hahn.

    The house was extended to include a wing constructed on the south-west corner (1908), and a single-storey solarium (or music room) on the south-east corner (1914).  Following Edward and Agnes Euphemia Wood's donation of the house to Victoria University in 1925, and with a donation from Lady Flavelle, a single-storey extension on the north-west to accommodate a cafeteria and other functions was added when it was adaptively re-used as a university women's residence, social and athletic centre.  It was subsequently owned by the University of Toronto in 1949 and its name changed to Falconer Hall in 1952.  It was occupied by the newly-created York University in 1960-61.  From 1972 it has been occupied by the University of Toronto's Faculty of Law.  Facing Queen's Park and located between Sir Joseph Flavelle's former house, Holwood, (1901) to the south, the McLaughlin Planetarium and the Royal Ontario Museum to the North and the Edward Johnson Building to the west, the house is part of the rich architectural and cultural history of this section of the University of Toronto campus and contributes to the evolving sequence the grand thoroughfare of University Avenue and Avenue Road.

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Design and Physical Value

    Wymilwood is valued as an example of the grand residential houses built on this section of the "University Grounds" in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, first characterizing this side of Queen's Park prior to its development as a university and cultural precinct.  In its massing and details the house is an excellent example of a design which incorporates Arts and Crafts principles cloaking them in Elizabethan detail and the influence of the Edwardian period.  The two-and-a-half storey house reveals the Arts and Crafts sensibility as it is composed with complex asymmetrical massing consisting of multiple projecting bays and bay windows, steeply projecting gable roofs and tall clusters of chimneys terminated by bands of decorative brick.

    Clad in a deep red brick with limestone detail, the Elizabethan details are present on the exterior in the half timbering of the gables on the south, west and north facades, in the stone details including the irregular quoins surrounding the windows, the profiles of the columns on the window bays on the south elevation, and in the styling of the rain spouts and in decorative details on the north bay window on the east elevation.  The Edwardian taste for the Baroque is present in the pedimented door case with its pair of stone, Tuscan Doric columns surrounding a recessed barrel-vaulted entry loggia.  The windows provide the informal variety associated with the Arts and Crafts in their diverse number of sashes and sizes.  On the principal east façade, the inclusion of small multiple-paned sashes in each window unifies the elevation and is also characteristic of the Arts and Crafts movement. 

    The interior of the house has cultural heritage value as it is similarly eclectic in its design and detail.  The Arts and Crafts is present in the large entry hallway with its fireplace and the winding stair, but the detailing throughout the interiors is classical reflecting the Edwardian period in which the house was built.   Two fine examples of this are the Billiard Room which was added in 1908 and features Circassian walnut panelling and an elaborately carved stone fireplace and the solarium (music room) of 1914.  The Elizabethan style is evident in the living room fireplace with the strap work and floral carving on the large hood above the recessed fireplace and in the octagonal panelling of the ceiling.  The Art Nouveau, which was a popular style during the construction of the house, is contained within the small library and is evident in the stylized linear figures and decoration in two of the four murals attributed to Gustav Hahn. The floral carvings on the panelling and the cross-barrel vaulted ceiling which features carved plaster with fine floral and vine motifs are similar characteristics of the Art Nouveau and are also attributed to Hahn.

    Historical and Associative Value

    Wymilwood is valued for its association with Edward Rogers Wood (1866-1941) who constructed the house as his residence in 1902-3 and he lived there with his wife, Agnes Euphemia Wood (1868-1950) until 1924.  With a reputation of being a financial genius, Wood was an important Canadian financier, the Managing Director of the Central Canada Loan and Savings Co. and a founder and Head of Dominion Securities in 1901 which, within two years of its inception, became the largest bond dealership in Canada.  Wood was also the Vice-President of the National Trust, Brazilian Traction, Light and Power, Canada Life Assurance and the Canadian Bank of Commerce and served on numerous boards.  Wood was a Methodist and a generous benefactor.  With his neighbour Sir Joseph Flavelle, Wood was appointed a Regent of the Board of Governors of Victoria University in 1903.  The following year, his wife, Agnes Euphemia Wood was appointed to the Victoria University Women's Educational Association. In 1905 the Woods donated $30,000 to convert Drynan house, at the south-east corner of Queen's Park as a women's residence, enabling Victoria University to accept many more women students. In 1925, Edward and Agnes Wood gave Wymilwood to Victoria University, and with financial contributions from their neighbour, Lady Flavelle, to adaptively re-use the house to provide a much needed women's centre for social, athletic and residential purposes at the UofT. During the First World War, Wood served as the Director of the IMB's Aviation Department, including the Curtiss Aeroplane branch plant in Toronto as well as leading the Victory Loan Campaign, the highly successful campaign to raise funds through bonds. Wood supported teaching programs at Victoria University, the YMCA, and the Toronto General Hospital.  He was a founder of the Art Gallery of Toronto (now the AGO), served as a Chairman of the Board of Grace Hospital and was a Trustee of the Toronto Orthopaedic Hospital.  Agnes and Ed Wood were among the private donors supporting the commission of the Gustav Hahn ceiling at St. Paul's on Avenue Road in 1901 and subsequently commissioned Hahn to do murals in the library at Wymilwood. 

    Wymilwood is also valued for its association with the UofT and York University.  It was owned by the UofT from 1949 and re-named in 1952 for Robert Falconer who served as the fourth president of the UofT from 1907-1932.  In 1960 Falconer Hall was, with Glendon Hall (the second Wood residence), the location of the incipient York University in its first years of its creation and from 1974 has provided additional accommodation for the Faculty of Law, located in Flavelle House.  The house and its occupant have contributed to the rich history and evolution of the Victoria University and the UofT throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. 

    Wymilwood is valued for its association with the architects Sproatt & Rolph.  Henry Sproatt (1866-1934) and Ernest Ross Rolph (1871-1958) were the partners of one of Toronto's leading firms from 1900-1934 with a reputation for its range of commissions for residential, institutional, commercial and industrial buildings.   The practice extended its influence across Ontario and as far away as Manitoba and Nova Scotia.  Important projects included the Birge Carnegie Library, Victoria College (1908-10), Hart House (1911-19), Upper Canada College (1923-4), Canada Life Building (1930-31), Royal York Hotel (1927-29 with Ross and Macdonald), and Eaton's College Park (1929-30 with Ross and MacDonald) and the Ontario Hydro Electric Power Commission Building (1934-5) now the Princess Margaret Hospital. 

    Wymilwood is value for its association with the architectural firm of Carrere & Hastings & Eustace G. Bird Architects.  The firm was created following the commissioning of the New York firm of Carrere & Hastings to undertake the Royal Bank building in 1906.  Eustace Bird, a Canadian who had worked in Toronto, was working in their office and agreed to be the local architect supervising the job and the partnership lasted from 1906-1916.  Carrere & Hastings were one of New York's leading architectural firms, championing the Beaux Arts architectural style best exhibited in their design of the New York Public Library.

    Wymilwood is also valued for its association with the artist Gustav Hahn (1866-1962) who contributed the murals and carved ceiling plasterwork in the library.[3]  Hahn was a German-born Canadian artist, well-known for his painting, murals and interior design, who contributed to the introduction of the Art Nouveau style in Canada and was influential through his teaching at the Ontario College of Art. He was commissioned to undertake murals at the Old Toronto City Hall, the Ontario Legislature Building and the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa in 1906.

    Contextual Value

    Located on the west side of Queen's Park, Wymilwood, at 84 Queen's Park, is valued as it defines and maintains the character of this section of Queen's Park between Bloor Street West and Hoskin Avenue.  Its domestic typology, complex massing, form and details, representing early 20th century house-form architecture, and its setting with lawns, trees and shrubs are of contextual value as they maintain the residential character which represents the early history and development of this particular section. 

    The house is situated to the north of Holwood, (1901-2) Sir Joseph Flavelle's grand estate, now adaptively re-used as the Faculty of Law and known as Flavelle House, to south of the Royal Ontario Museum (1913-2007) and the McLaughlin Planetarium (1966-68) and to the west of the Edward Johnson Building (1960-62) all of which introduced important educational and cultural uses to the area as it evolved over time.  Wymilwood, in its many incarnations is historically and functionally linked to this evolution.  Physically it contributes to the diverse architectural character and periods of its neighbours while contributing to and maintaining a low-rise scale and character.

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    The following attributes contribute to the value of the property at 84 Queen's Park as a representative of an Edwardian Arts and Crafts style house with Edwardian Classical, Elizabethan and Art Nouveau elements characteristic of the period:

    -         The location of the building set back from the street in a landscaped setting

    -         The irregular and informal plan of the house, based on an L-shape with

    -   the central entry hall and stair

    -   the principal rooms on the outer face of the L

    -   the service rooms located to the north and west corner

    -         The complex massing of the two-and-a-half storey building on a raised basement with:

    -   projecting bays terminating in gable roofs,

    -   bay windows of circular and polygonal forms,

    -   raised gable end walls  

    -   numerous clustered chimneys, several of which have buttresses, stepped brick courses and terracotta chimney pots

    -         The dark, red-brick cladding and its various details including:

    -   buttresses,

    -   raised gable ends,

    -   stepped courses on the chimneys, and

    -   piers framing the original entry from the porte-cochere on the north side

    -         The stone details including:

    -   the irregularly stepped quoins around the windows

    -   the caps on the buttresses,

    -   the rain spouts

    -   the window frames with Elizabethan columns

    -         The principal east façade including:

    -   the asymmetrical composition of two differently-sized, projecting bays terminating in gable roofs,

    -   the entry bay with its stone door case and recessed entry,

    -   two, first-floor projecting bay windows

    -         On the east façade, the principal entrance including:

    -   its stone door case and

    -   recessed barrel-vaulted entryway with its pair of Tuscan Doric columns, semi-circular pediment with a cartouche and a floral motif in the niche

    -         On the east façade, the casement windows of varying sizes and numbers, with sashes or upper sashes of multiple small panes

    -         The south façade including:

    -   the composition of three gable roofs

    -   two projecting double-storey bays

    -   the single storey addition of the solarium (aka music room)

    -   the half-timbering on the jettied third floor of the central bay

    -   the stone window frames with their various details and

    -   the wood sash

    Please note: the one-storey, entry vestibule, a later addition, is not included in the attributes

    -         The west facade including:

    -   its asymmetrical composition of gable roofs of varying heights

    -   the projecting hexagonal bay with a set-back gable dormer

    -   the half-timbered second storey terminating in a gable roof and

    -   the various double-hung and casement wood windows

    -         The north facade including:

    -   its raised gabled end wall

    -   projecting chimney

    -   pair of brick piers which were part of the original porte-cochere

    -   the half-timbered gable dormer

    -   the chimneys with their varying decorative brick and stone details and terracotta chimney pots

    The following attributes contribute to the evolving history of the house as it was adaptively re-used as a university women's centre which included social, athletic, dining and residential facilities:

    -         The double-storey, gable-roofed extension to the west of the original entry verandah, including:

    -   the infill of the verandah with a new door on the north elevation,

    -   the single-storey extension at the north-west corner of the building

    -   the infill, with the entry on the west elevation, between the 1908 extension to the south and the later extension to the north with its gable-roofed canopy

    -         The brick cladding and stone details including:

    -   window sills

    -   headers

    -   stepped quoins and

    -   coping on the parapets and gable ends

    -         The pairs of casement windows with their cruciform divisions with longer lower sashes and multiple small panes

    The following interior attributes contribute to the value of the property at 84 Queen's Park as a representative of an Edwardian Arts and Crafts style house with Elizabethan and Art Nouveau features:

    -         The Entry Hall including:

    -   the fireplace

    -   the winding open staircase and detailed handrail

    -   the stained-glass skylight

    -         The Drawing Room including

    -   the fireplace and its surround

    -   the ceiling with its decorative coffering and the cornice

    -         The Library including:

    -   the murals

    -   the carved plaster ceiling

    -   the fireplace

    -   the woodwork and cabinetry

    -         The Living Room including

    -   the ceiling decoration including a hexagonal coffering pattern

    -   the wood detailing including the cornice and panelling

    -   the inglenook fireplace with its stone surround, wood-panelled recess with decorated panels and hood with Elizabethan strap-work carving supported on corbel brackets

    -         The Solarium (or music room) including:

    -   the staircase with metal handrails and marble steps

    -   the fire place  

    -   the ceiling and cornice decoration with lattice motifs  

    -         The former central bay of the original Palm Room-later Gallery including:

    -   the barrel-vaulted ceiling

    -   the classical cornice and Corinthian pilasters

    -         The Billiard Room including:

    -   the carved ceiling, cornice and panelled walls of Circassian walnut

    -   the carved stone fireplace

    Contextual Value

    The following attributes represent the contextual value of the property at 84 Queen's Park as an early 20th-century grand house in the Edwardian Arts and Crafts Style whose features convey the original domestic use, and the period of its construction as well as supporting the high quality of architectural design and diverse architectural character and the importance of landscape which characterize this section of Queen's Park from Hoskin Avenue to Bloor Street West and includes the Taddle Creek Ravine:

    -         The location of the building on the west side of Queen's Park and its setting including:

    -   the set back from Queen's Park

    -   the landscaped setting on its principal east front, including lawns, shrubs and trees

    -         The two-and-a-half-storey form and complex massing of the building which conveys its original domestic function including:

    -   the projecting bays of single and triple storeys in rectangular, polygonal and circular plan

    -   the complex roofline of multiple gables and clusters of tall chimneys

    -   the brick cladding and stone trim with Edwardian and Elizabethan details

    Notice of an objection to the proposed designations may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of November 12, 2020, which is December 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.


    [1] Richards, p. 129.
    [2] Macmillan et al., p.1
    [3] Martyn, p. 201, attributes the murals to Hahn.  The attribution of the plasterwork is based on Hahn's similar plasterwork done with murals at the adjacent Flavelle House.

    • 80 Queen's Park Toronto Ontario
    • 84 Queen's Park Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 2100 and 2106 Yonge Street

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 2100 and 2106 Yonge Street under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

    2100 Yonge Street

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 2100 Yonge Street (including the entrance addresses at 2102 and 2104 Yonge Street and 8 and 12 Manor Road West) is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three criteria of design and physical, historical and associative, and contextual values.

    Description

    The property at 2100 Yonge Street (including the entrances addresses at 2102 and 2104 Yonge Street and 8 and 12 Manor Road West) is situated on the west side of Yonge Street at the northwest corner of Yonge Street and Manor Road West. The property at 2100 Yonge Street contains a large two-storey commercial building with glazed storefronts in the first-storey and apartments in the second-storey. The property at 2100 Yonge Street was constructed in 1936-7 and was designed by the architect Benjamin Brown (1890-1974).

    The property at 2100 Yonge Street is located in the Yonge-Eglinton Secondary Plan Area and the Midtown in Focus planning study area. It was listed on the City of Toronto Heritage Register on 2 October 2017.

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Design and Physical Value

    The property at 2100 Yonge Street has design and physical value as being a representative example of a “Main Street Row,” which is identified by its corner location, two-storey scale, rectangular form and massing, flat roofline, and the glazed commercial storefronts fronting Yonge Street with residential or commercial units in the upper floor. These elements are typical of buildings dating to the interwar era in North Toronto. The property at 2100 Yonge Street also has value as being a modest representative example of the classical style, with its fenestration in the second-storey, the symmetrically-placed tripartite, double and single flat-headed window openings, the dentil molding along the principal (east) and side (south) elevations, the continuous stone band course connecting the window heads in both elevations, and the recessed entrance set in a decorative stone surround in the side (south) elevation.

    Historical and Associative Value

    The property at 2100 Yonge Street has historical and associative value as being representative of the career of the noteworthy Toronto architect Benjamin Brown, who was among one of the first Jewish architects to sustain a successful practice in Toronto during the first decades of the twentieth century. Brown designed more than 200 buildings throughout his career, many of which were in the Art Deco style, although he used various styles, including Georgian, Craftsman, Colonial Revival, Tudor, and Romanesque elements. The modest classical details seen throughout the property at 2100 Yonge Street can be seen at some of the other buildings designed by Brown, such as at the Primrose Club Building (1920).

    Contextual Value

    The property at 2100 Yonge Street has contextual value for its role in defining, supporting and maintaining the historical mid-rise streetscape character of the thoroughfare on Yonge Street between Davisville Avenue and Blythwood Road on a prominent “Main Street” in North Toronto. The building at 2100 Yonge Street is historically, visually and physically linked to its setting on the northwest corner of Manor Road West at the south end of the continuous group of commercial buildings with a shared setback in the block between Manor Road West and Hillsdale Avenue West. It is also linked to the neighbouring property at 2106 Yonge Street, which was designed one-year later, and included the same buff brick masonry and stone cornice, although the one here wraps around the south corner and there are brick quoins at the corners.

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 2100 Yonge Street as a representative example of a "Main Street Row" with modest classical embellishments:

    -   The corner location, two-storey scale, rectangular form and massing, and flat roofline

    -   The glazed commercial storefronts fronting Yonge Street in the first-storey with commercial or residential units in the second-storey

    -   In the east and south elevations, the fenestration in the second storey, with the symmetrically-placed tripartite, double and single flat-headed window openings

    -   The dentil molding along the east and south elevations, the continuous stone band course connecting the window heads in both elevations, and the recessed entrance set in the decorative stone surround on the south elevation

    Contextual Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 2100 Street as a defining, supporting, and maintaining the historical mid-rise character of the area and being historically, visually, and physically linked to its surroundings:

    -   The setback, placement and orientation of the building on the northwest corner of Yonge Street and Manor Road West where it is part of a continuous row

    -   The stone cornice that wraps around the south corner

    -   The materials, with the buff brick cladding and the brick and stone detailing, including the brick quoins on the corners

    Note: the north side elevation adjoins the neighbouring building. No heritage attributes are identified on the rear (west) elevation. The westernmost storefront of the elevation fronting Manor Road West is not original and is not identified as a heritage attribute.

    2106 Yonge Street

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 2106 Yonge Street (including entrance addresses at 2108 and 2110 Yonge Street) is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the categories of design and physical and contextual value.

    Description

    The property at 2106 Yonge Street (including entrance addresses at 2108 and 2110 Yonge Street) is situated on west side of Yonge Street between Manor Road West and Hillsdale Avenue West. It contains a large two-storey commercial building with glazed storefronts in the first-storey and apartments in the second-storey. The property at 2106 Yonge Street was constructed in 1937-8 and the architect is unknown.

    The property at 2106 Yonge Street is located in the Yonge-Eglinton Secondary Plan Area and the Midtown in Focus planning study area.

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Design and Physical Value

    The property at 2106 Yonge Street has design and physical value as being a representative example of a “Main Street Row,” which is identified by the two-storey scale, rectangular form and massing, the flat roofline, and the glazed commercial storefront with residential or commercial units in the upper floor. These elements are typical of buildings dating to the interwar era in North Toronto.

    Contextual Value

    The property at 2106 Yonge Street has contextual value for its role in defining, supporting and maintaining the historical mid-rise streetscape character of the thoroughfare on Yonge Street between Davisville Avenue and Blythwood Road on a prominent “Main Street” in North Toronto. The building at 2106 Yonge Street is historically, visually and physically linked to its setting as part of a continuous group of commercial buildings with a shared setback in the block between Manor Road West and Hillsdale Avenue West. The design and modest classical details in the property at 2106 Yonge Street are linked to the neighbouring property at 2100 Yonge Street, which was designed one-year prior, and includes the same continuous stone band course connecting the window heads and a stone cornice that sits above the storefronts, as well as buff brick masonry.

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 2106 Yonge Street as a representative example of a "Main Street Row":

    -   The two-storey scale, rectangular form and massing, and flat roofline

    -   The glazed commercial storefront in the first-storey with commercial or residential units in the second-storey

    Contextual Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 2106 Street as a defining, supporting, and maintaining the historical mid-rise character of the area and being historically, visually, and physically linked to its surroundings:

    -   The setback, placement and orientation of the building on the west side of Yonge Street between Manor Road West and Hillsdale Avenue West where it is part of a continuous row

    -   The materials, with the buff brick cladding and the brick and stone detailing

    -   The modest classical elements, including the continuous stone band course connecting the window heads and the stone cornice that sits above the storefronts (which have been altered)

    Note: the south side elevation adjoins the neighbouring building. No heritage attributes are identified on the side (north) elevation. The second-storey windows are not original and are not identified as a heritage attribute.

    Notice of an objection to the proposed designations may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of November 12, 2020, which is December 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.

    • 2100 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario
    • 2106 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Intention to Designate - 578 King Street West

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    Take notice that Toronto City Council intends to designate the lands and buildings known municipally as 578 King Street West under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

    Reasons for Designation

    The property at 578 King Street West (including the entrance address at 580 King Street West) is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under all three criteria of design and physical, historical and associative, and contextual values.

    Description

    The property at 578 King Street West (including the entrance address at 580 King Street West) is a narrow, rectangular-form building situated on the north side of King Street West between Portland Street and Spadina Avenue. It is a two-storey, factory-type building on a raised basement and contains Edwardian Classical style details. The building was commissioned in 1904 by Davis & Henderson, printing and bookbinders, to house their new factory and was designed by the well-known Toronto architectural firm Burke and Horwood. The building was completed in 1906, and Davis & Henderson continued to own and occupy the building until 1957. After the property was sold, it was occupied by various tenants during the latter half of the twentieth century, including Capital Findings Leather Ltd, Present-Ware Enterprises Ltd, giftware, and a restaurant.

    The subject property is located adjacent to several commercial-type buildings, including 582-592 King Street West and 473 Adelaide Street West (directly west of the subject site) and 570-572 King Street West (directly east of the subject site), which are designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

    The property at 578 King Street West was listed on the City of Toronto's Heritage Register in May 2005. The property is located in the King-Spadina Heritage Conservation District.[1]

    Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

    Design and Physical Value

    The property at 578 King Street West has design and physical value as a representative example of factory-type building with Edwardian Classical style details. The long rectangular form and massing, two-storey scale, and rear (north) elevation with its raised loading bay entrance, chimney, and six segmental-arch windows of varying sizes with stone sills in the first- and second-storeys and the one flat-headed window and stone sill in the third-storey, are characteristic features of the factory building type. Also representative of this building type are the presence of regularly spaced window openings that let ample light into the interior, with four flat-headed windows at the raised-basement level with stone lintels, five segmental-arch windows in the first-storey with stone sills, and five elliptical-arch windows in the second-storey with stone sills and paired-arch wooden frames. Elements of the Edwardian Classical style are evident in the mixture of brick and stone cladding and in the symmetry of the arrangement of window openings in the principal (south) elevation. The style is further evident in the six brick pilasters that articulate the division of five bays, which are chamfered at their base and terminate at horseshoe arches with triangular arches in between at the roof level with stone coping, and in the ornamentation of the entrance in the southeast corner of the principal (south) elevation, which contains a stone lintel surmounted on a wooden door with a canopy containing dentil molding sitting on top of two corbels carved into scrolls.

    Historical and Associative Value

    The property at 578 King Street West has historical and associative value through its direct association with Davis & Henderson. The business, which was started in 1877 as a manufacturing company that specialized in printing and bookbinding, has been in operation for over a century, and their purpose-built factory at 578 King Street West was owned and occupied by the company for fifty-three years. The property also has value through its potential to yield information about the development of the King-Spadina neighbourhood in the early 1900s as an important industrial centre that contributed to Toronto's prosperity and provided employment for over 120 years.

    The property has further associative value as it demonstrates the work of the prolific architectural firm Burke and Horwood. The firm practiced under that name from 1894-1907, and their architectural portfolio in Toronto was expansive. During the last decade of the nineteenth century and into the first decade of the twentieth century, the firm had numerous commissions and designed several types of buildings, including a number of factories and warehouses at the turn of the century. Many of these structures were fashioned in the Edwardian Classical style.

    Contextual Value

    The property at 578 King Street West has contextual value for its role in defining, supporting, and maintaining the early-twentieth-century industrial character of the area as it maintains the scale, setback, placement, and orientation, the material qualities, and the design patterns of the former factory and warehouse structures to its east and west along King Street West. Built between 1904 and 1906, and being located in an area that was the centre of enterprise and employment for over 120 years, the former factory building is physically, functionally, visually, and historically linked to its surroundings and contributes to the identity of the King-Spadina neighbourhood. More specifically, the property at 578 King Street West is visually linked to the flanking heritage properties through its red brick and stone masonry, and through the treatment of window openings.

    Heritage Attributes

    Design and Physical Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 578 King Street West as a representative example of a factory-type building with Edwardian Classical style details:

    -   The long rectangular form and massing and the two-storey scale on a raised basement

    In the principal (south) elevation:

    -   The four flat-headed windows at the raised-basement level with stone lintels

    -   The five segmental-arch windows in the first-storey with stone sills

    -   The five elliptical-arch windows in the second-storey with stone sills

    -   The paired arch wooden frames in the five elliptical-arch windows in the second-storey

    -   The six brick pilasters with their chamfered bases and horseshoe arches with triangular arches in between at the roof level

    -   The stone coping on top of the horseshoe arches and triangular arches at the roof level

    -   The canopy above the entrance in the southeast corner, which contains dentil molding, and sits on top of two corbels carved into scrolls

    In the rear (north) elevation:

    -   The raised loading bay entrance and chimney

    -   The six segmental-arch windows of varying sizes with stone sills in the first- and second-storeys and the one flat-headed window and stone sill in the third-storey

    Contextual Value

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 578 King Street West as defining, supporting, and maintaining the early-twentieth-century industrial character of the area:

    -   The setback, placement, and orientation of the building on the north side of King Street West where it is part of a continuous row with the heritage properties to its west

    Attributes that contribute to the value of the property at 578 King Street West as being physically, functionally, visually, and historically linked to its surroundings and contributing to the identity of the King-Spadina neighbourhood:

    -   In the principal (south) elevation: the materials, including brick cladding with stone details in the window sills and lintels and the stone lintel above the entrance

    Note: The side (east) elevation, visible only at the southeast corner, is not included in the heritage attributes. The side (west) elevation adjoins the neighbouring building, so it is not included in the heritage attributes. 

    Notice of an objection to the proposed designations may be served on the City Clerk, Attention:  Ellen Devlin, Administrator, Toronto and East York Community Council, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, 2nd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5H 2N2, within thirty days of November 12, 2020, which is December 14, 2020. The notice of objection must set out the reason(s) for the objection, and all relevant facts.


    [1] The King-Spadina HCD was enacted by City Council under by-law 1111-2017 amended by by-law 1241-2017 and is currently under appeal http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2017.TE26.14

    • 578 King Street West Toronto Ontario

    Notice of Proposal to Amend the City of Toronto Municipal Code: Chapter 694, Signs, General (the "Sign By-law")

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    Notice is given that the Chief Building Official and Executive Director, Toronto Building, is reporting on a proposed amendment to Municipal Code Chapter 694, Signs, General (the "Sign By-law"), to allow for, and regulate, the display of one third party electronic roof sign at the premises municipally known as 322 Yonge Street.

    The proposed amendment seeks to:

    1.   Add an area-specific amendment to the Sign By-law for the premises municipally known as 322 Yonge Street to amend the Sign Bylaw to allow:

    -         One third party electronic roof sign containing one curved sign face measuring 27.65 metres horizontally by 6.4 metres vertically along the southerly and easterly building elevations, containing electronic static copy and, with a total sign face area of approximately 177 square metres; and, a height (highest point of the sign measured from grade) of 15.0 metres; and,

    -         First party signs, in accordance with Section 694-26(A) of the Sign Bylaw.

    The Chief Building Official and Executive Director, Toronto Building, is recommending that the Council of the City of Toronto approve the area-specific amendment to the Sign By-law, for 322 Yonge Street.

    The Planning and Housing Committee may recommend that the Council of the City of Toronto amend the Sign By-law to amend Schedule B, Signage Master Plans and Area Specific Amendments, to add a new area specific amendment to Schedule B, Signage Master Plans and Area Specific Amendments, to allow the specific premises to contain, one third party electronic roof sign and first party signs, in accordance with Section 694-26(A) of the Sign Bylaw.

    At its meeting to be held via video conference on Tuesday, November 17, 2020 at 9:30 a.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, the Planning and Housing Committee of Toronto City Council will hear from any person or by his or her counsel, agent, or solicitor, who wishes to speak to the matter.

    To obtain or view a copy of the report outlining the proposed amendments, you may view the Planning and Housing Committee agenda.

    To submit comments or make a presentation to the Planning and Housing Committee on Tuesday, November 17, 2020, as a courtesy, please contact the Committee no later than 12:00 p.m. on Monday, November 16, 2020:

    Planning and Housing Committee

    Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

    10th Floor, West Tower, Toronto, ON, M5H 2N2

    Telephone: 416-397-4579; Fax: 416-392-2980

    Email: phc@toronto.ca

    To ask questions regarding the content of the report, please contact:

    Ted Van Vliet

    Manager, Sign By-law Unit, Toronto Building

    100 Queen Street West, Ground Floor, East Tower

    Toronto ON M5H 2N2

    Telephone: 416-392-4235

    Email: Ted.VanVliet@toronto.ca

    Any comments received after the Committee meeting will be forwarded to City Council.

    If this matter is postponed at the Committee meeting or City Council meeting or considered at a subsequent Committee or City Council meeting, no additional notice will be provided other than the information on the subsequent Committee or City Council agenda. Please contact the above City officials if you require notice in these cases.

    The Planning and Housing Committee will make its final recommendations on November 17, 2020 which will be forwarded to City Council for its meeting on November 25 and 26, 2020.

    Notice to people writing or making presentations to the Planning and Housing Committee: The City of Toronto Act, 2006 and the City of Toronto Municipal Code authorize the City of Toronto to collect any personal information in your communication or presentation to City Council or its Committees.

    The City collects this information to enable it to make informed decisions on the relevant issue(s). If you are submitting letters, faxes, e-mails, presentations, or other communications to the City, you should be aware that your name and the fact that you communicated with the City will become part of the public record and will appear on the City’s website. The City will also make your communication and any personal information in it - such as your postal address, telephone number, or e-mail address - available to the public, unless you expressly request the City to remove it.

    Many Committee, Board, and Advisory Body meetings are broadcast live over the internet for the public to view. If you speak at the meeting you will appear in the video broadcast. Video broadcasts are archived and continue to be publicly available.

    If you want to learn more about why and how the City collects your information, write to the City Clerk’s Office, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen Street West, Toronto ON, M5H 2N2 or call 416-397-4579.

    • 322 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario

    Heritage Notices - June 29 and 30, 2020

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    At its meeting on June 29 and 30, 2020:

    City Council adopted the following:

    Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   582 King Street West.  See City Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines for the objection period to City Council’s notice of intention to designate a property is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the objection period to the notice of intention to designate a property will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve a notice of intention to designate a property pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

     

     

     

    • 582 King Street West Toronto Ontario

    Heritage Notices - February 26, 2020

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    At its meeting on February 26, 2020

    City Council adopted the following:

    Alterations to a property designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   197 King Street East. See City Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines, including such notice periods for which the City is subject to under the Ontario Heritage Act is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the notice period will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve the required notice pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

    • 197 King Street East Toronto Ontario

    Heritage Notices - May 28, 2020

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    At its meeting on May 28, 2020:

    City Council adopted the following:

    Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   2490-2506 Yonge Street.  See City Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines for the objection period to City Council’s notice of intention to designate a property is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the objection period to the notice of intention to designate a property will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve a notice of intention to designate a property pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

    Alterations to a property designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   481 University Avenue. See City Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines, including such notice periods for which the City is subject to under the Ontario Heritage Act is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the notice period will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve the required notice pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

    • 2490 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario
    • 2506 Yonge Street Toronto Ontario
    • 481 University Avenue Toronto Ontario

    Heritage Notices - July 28 and 29, 2020

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    At its meeting on July 28 and 29, 2020:

    City Council adopted the following:

    Intention Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   65 George Street.  See Council decision.

    -   501 Vesta Drive.   See Council decision.

    -   292 Main Street.  See Council decision.

    -   1150 Eglinton Avenue East.  See Council decision.

    -   64 Wellesley Street East.  See Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines for the objection period to City Council’s notice of intention to designate a property is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the objection period to the notice of intention to designate a property will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve a notice of intention to designate a property pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

    Amendment to Designating By-Law under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   206 Russell Hill Road.  See Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines for the objection period to City Council’s notice of intention to amend a designating by-law is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the objection period to the notice of intention to amend a designating by-law will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve a notice of intention to amend a designating by-law pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act. 

    Alterations to a property designated under Part V of the Ontario Heritage Act

    -   129 Bedford Road.  See Council decision.

    Legislative Note: The Province of Ontario has extended the March 17, 2020 Declaration of Emergency and made several subsequent Emergency Orders under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Pursuant to Ontario Regulation 73/20, the statutory timelines, including such notice periods for which the City is subject to under the Ontario Heritage Act is currently suspended. The statutory timelines under the Ontario Heritage Act are intended to commence after September 11, 2020, pursuant to Ontario Regulation 106/20 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, subject to any further amendments.  Unless the regulation is otherwise amended, the notice period will therefore commence after September 11, 2020, at which the time, the City will post and serve the required notice pursuant to the Ontario Heritage Act

     

     

     

    • 65 George Street Toronto Ontario
    • 501 Vesta Drive Toronto Ontario
    • 292 Main Street Toronto Ontario
    • 1150 Eglinton Avenue East Toronto Ontario
    • 64 Wellesley Street East Toronto Ontario
    • 129 Bedford Road Toronto Ontario
    • 206 Russell Hill Road Toronto Ontario

    Emergency Order No. 2 - To impose regulations requiring physical distancing within Nathan Phillip Square in the same manner as other Public Squares.

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    CITY OF TORONTO

     
    EMERGENCY ORDER No. 2
     

    To impose regulations requiring physical distancing within Nathan Phillip Square in the same manner as other Public Squares.
     

    WHEREAS under sections 7 and 8 of the City of Toronto Act, 2006 the City has broad authority to provide any service or thing the City considers necessary or desirable for the public and to pass by-laws in respect of the health, safety and well-being of persons and the economic, social and environmental well-being of the City; and

     

    WHEREAS City Council has enacted Chapter 59, Emergency Management, of the City of Toronto Municipal Code ("Chapter 59") with respect to numerous matters concerning the City's response to a situation or an impending situation that constitutes a danger of major proportions that could result in serious harm to persons or substantial damage to property and that is caused by the forces of nature, a disease, an accident or other health risk or an act whether intentional or otherwise; and

     

    WHEREAS under the specific powers and restrictions respecting delegation in sections 20 to 24, the City may delegate its powers and duties under the Act to an officer or employee of the City, as provided in section 21; and

     

    WHEREAS under section 59-6.1.A. of Chapter 59, City Council delegated its statutory authority under the City of Toronto Act, 2006, and under any other legislation, to the Mayor, exclusively for use in emergencies, subject to the specific restrictions and conditions imposed by Chapter 59, the Act, and otherwise; and

     

    WHEREAS COVID-19 is present within the City of Toronto, and COVID-19 is a disease that is readily communicable from person to person, carries a risk of serious complications such as pneumonia or kidney failure, and may result in death; and

     

    WHEREAS the spread of COVID-19 has been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization; and

     

    WHEREAS, on March 17, 2020, an emergency was declared, by means of Order in Council 518/2020 for purposes of s.7.1 of the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, due to the health risks to Ontario residents arising from COVID-19; and

     

    WHEREAS, on March 23, 2020 an emergency was declared by the head of council of the City of Toronto for purposes of s.4 of the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act, and s.59-5.1 of Chapter 59 due to the risk to the health of the residents of the City of Toronto arising from spread of COVID-19 and its presence within the City of Toronto (the "Emergency"); and

     

    WHEREAS this order is based on the advice of the Medical Officer of Health, who has recommended physical distancing measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, including maintaining a distance of at least two metres from other individuals who are not members of the same household; and

     

    WHEREAS in accordance with section 59-6.1.B. of Chapter 59, I believe that it is necessary to utilize the delegated authority to make the following order to address the Emergency in a timely manner, and that the exercise of the delegated authority is a reasonable basis to alleviate harm or damage as a reasonable alternative to other measures to address the Emergency for the following reasons: due to the fact that COVID-19 is a disease that is readily communicable from person to person and that time is of the essence in implementing measures to address the spread of COVID-19, which makes implementation of these measures through other means impractical in the circumstances; and

     

    WHEREAS the City currently regulates and prohibits conduct on the specific City property known as Nathan Phillips Square under the regulations contained in the former City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 237, Nathan Phillips Square; and

     

    WHEREAS the City currently regulates and prohibits conduct on the other public squares of the City, through the provisions of City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 636, Public Squares, which includes in the listed prohibited conduct in these areas, a failure to maintain a distance of two metres from other individuals who are not members of their same household; and

     

    WHEREAS it is my opinion that the harm caused by COVID-19 will be best alleviated by having regulations concerning the failure to maintain a distance of two metres from other individuals who are not members of their same household, contained in as harmonized of a set of regulations as possible, I believe that Nathan Phillips Square should be included in the definition of Public Square for the purposes of being subject to the specific regulations prohibiting a failure to maintain a distance of two metres from other individuals who are not members of their same household which is applicable to all other public squares of the City.

     

    Therefore, I, John Tory, Mayor of the CITY OF TORONTO, enact by issuing of this Order, the following regulations with respect to the City of Toronto:

     

    1.         Chapter 636, Public Squares of the City of Toronto Municipal Code is amended to require compliance with physical distancing guidelines within the public square known as Nathan Phillips Square by:

     

    (a)        Adding the following as new subsection 636-22.A.(4) to the definition of Square for purposes of section 636-22:

     

    (4)        for purposes of subsection 636-22.C.1, “Nathan Phillips Square” as defined in former City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 237, Nathan Phillips Square.

     

    2.         The above amendment is revoked 30 days from the date of this order unless City Council authorizes an extension of the amendments.

     

    MAYOR JOHN TORY

     

    • 100 Queen Street West Toronto Ontario